West Nile Close to Home

It hasn't been verified in the Meridian-area yet, but the West Nile virus is all around us. And local health officials say because of the way it spreads, it could soon be here.

The Meridian Public Works Department sprays nightly for mosquitoes, they do it throughout the summer months, and have done so for years.

But Public Works Director Monty Jackson says in light of the West Nile outbreak, those sprayings will likely become more frequent.

Health officials say that spraying can be helpful, but they say the best way to prevent mosquito-born diseases like West Nile are best accomplished by getting rid of places where mosquitoes breed, like standing water.

Health officials like Dr. Melissa Campbell at Rush Hospital; say there's no reason to panic, even if you have symptoms of the virus. But they say if those symptoms persist or get worse, you should then visit the doctor.

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West Nile virus Facts

  • The West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne virus that can cause encephalitis (an inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord) in humans and other animals.

  • The virus is named after the West Nile region of Uganda where it was first isolated in1937.

  • The virus appeared for the first time in the United States during a 1999 outbreak in New York that killed seven people.

How is the West Nile virus Spread?

  • The virus is spread to humans, birds and other animals through the bite of an infected mosquito.

  • A mosquito becomes infected by biting a bird that is carrying the virus.

  • West Nile virus is not spread from person to person, and no evidence indicates the virus can be spread directly from birds to humans.

  • Only a small population of mosquitoes are likely to be infected and most people bitten by an infected mosquito do not become sick.

  • 1 in 300 people bitten by an infected mosquito get sick.

  • 1 in 100-150 who get sick become seriously ill.

  • 3 to 15 percent of those seriously ill die.

Symptoms of the Virus

  • The symptoms generally appear about 3 to 6 days after exposure. People over the age of 50 are at a greater risk of severe illness.

  • Milder symptoms include: Slight fever, headache, body aches, swollen glands and/or sometimes a skin rash.

  • Severe symptoms include: High fever, intense headache, stiff neck, and/or confusion.

Protecting Yourself

  • Control mosquitoes from breeding around your home.

  • Wear long and light colored clothing.

  • Use insect repellent products with no ore than 20-30 percent DEET for adults and less than 10 percent for children.

  • Spray repellent on your hands and then apply to your face. Be sure repellent is safe for human skin.

  • Wash off repellent daily and reapply as needed.

Source: www.vdh.state.va.us contributed to this report


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