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2016 Spring Commencement exercises

MSU Riley Center
2016 Spring Commencement exercises this Friday, May 6 at 11 am in the MSU Riley Center.

9:30 am (May 6) Students arrive

10:15 – group photo in Charles Young Exhibit Hall

10:30 – line up on 2nd floor of Riley Center


The first of eight Kinesiology students will be the first to walk across the stage at the MSU Riley Center having earned their kinesiology degree at MSU-Meridian. The Kinesiology program with a clinical exercise physiology concentration was first offered in Meridian in the fall of 2014 and due to the generosity of The Riley Foundation, moved into its new state-of-the-art home, the former Kress building in downtown Meridian, in January 2016.
Students are: Brandon Ward (Meridian), Trevor Ayllon (Newton) Holly Stevens (Philadelphia), Meghan McPherson (Union), Cody Lewis (Meridian); NeyJimmy Rodriguez (Meridian), Alex Weir (Philadelphia), and Matthew Griffin (Union).

Also first two graduates in the Bachelor of Applied Technology program will be graduating as well. Addison Swink, Meridian (member of the 186th ANG Air Refueling Wing and Antonio Deshawn Brown of Marion.


Four outstanding graduates for 2015-16 will be among the 110 candidates to walk across the stage during Mississippi State University-Meridian’s spring commencement Friday [May 6] at the MSU Riley Center.

Newton resident Rayanne Craven will be recognized as Outstanding Undergraduate from the division of Arts and Sciences. A member of Phi Theta Kappa at East Central Community College and a recipient of the G.V. “Sonny” Montgomery Meridian Scholarship at MSU-Meridian, Craven earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology.

Brazilian native Luiza Dos Santos Dobbins will be recognized as Outstanding Undergraduate from the division of Business. A member of the Honors College and Phi Theta Kappa at Meridian Community College and a Riley Scholar at MSU-Meridian, Dobbins earned a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Accounting.
Tyler Vick of Collinsville will be recognized as Outstanding Undergraduate from the division of Education. Vick transferred to MSU-Meridian from Meridian Community College where he was a member of Phi Theta Kappa national honor society. An honors student at MSU-Meridian he earned a Bachelor of Science degree in secondary education.

Suzanne Porter Stokes will be recognized as Outstanding Graduate student from the division of Education. A resident of Ocean Springs, Stokes earned a Master of Science in School Counseling from MSU-Meridian and her undergraduate degree in Communications from MSU Starkville.

Lisa Sollie
Project Coordinator
Office of Public Affairs
601.484.0113 (office)
601.484.0339 (fax)
lsollie@meridian.msstate.edu




JCJC holds two Spring Commencement Ceremonies ...

Jones County Junior College
JCJC holds two Spring Commencement Ceremonies with Wyatt Moulds as keynote speaker

ELLISVILLE - Jones County Junior College will be holding two Spring Commencement Ceremonies on Friday, May 13, at 10 a.m. for students whose names begin with the letters “A” though “L” in the A.B. Howard/Bobcat Gymnasium. The second ceremony will be held at 1:30 p.m. for those students whose last names begin with letters “M” through “Z.” Both ceremonies will also be live-streamed on the JCJC web page, http://www.jcjc.edu/.

About 623 of the more than 732 students eligible to graduate with either, an Associate in Arts degree, Associate in Applied Science degree, or a Vocational Certificate have chosen to participate in the ceremonies. About 300 students will participate in each of the ceremonies.

For the first time in recent history, a Jones County Junior College faculty member will be the keynote speaker. Wyatt Moulds is a 1972 graduate of Heidelberg High School, earning his Associate of Arts degree from Jones County Junior College, and both his Bachelors of Science and his Masters of Science degrees in history from the University of Southern Mississippi. Additionally, he has completed advanced studies in history and political science at the University of Southern Mississippi.
For 42-years, Moulds has taught history in Mississippi’s public schools with the last 34-years teaching at Jones County Junior College. The native of Jasper County has served as chairman of JCJC’s Social Science Division until his retirement in 2009. Ironically, Moulds has continued to teach a full-load of classes on an adjunct basis at JCJC during his “retirement.”
Mr. Moulds has also found time, since 2006 to serve as a consultant to Hollywood film director Gary Ross. His research of various topics will be included in the upcoming movie, “The Free State of Jones” which features a notorious Civil War rebel and relative of Moulds.
His address to the graduates is titled, “The Importance of Being on the Right Side of History.” Moulds explained, “I hope students will learn from my speech, that sometimes you have to make unpopular decisions to move civilization forward and I hope they will lead because that will be their responsibility to do so!”
Wyatt has been married to the former Faye Evans of Pachuta, Mississippi, for 42 years after meeting while in school at JCJC. They have two children, Zachary and Erin Moulds, who are also both JCJC graduates.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Wayne Henson to give MSU-Meridian commencement address

MSU Riley Center for Performing Arts and Education
Wayne Henson to give MSU-Meridian commencement address


MERIDIAN, Miss.—Wayne Henson, East Mississippi Electric Power Association’s CEO, will be the spring 2016 graduation speaker for Mississippi State University-Meridian.
The May 6 commencement program begins at 11 a.m. at the MSU Riley Center for Performing Arts and Education. Some 110 students are candidates for degrees.
A Kemper County native and longtime Clarke County resident, Henson graduated from Zack Huggins High School in Quitman. He went on to Mississippi State University, where he earned an electrical engineering degree in 1974.
During a more than four-decade-long EMEPA career, he has been CEO for the past 11 years. Along the way, he held positions of planning engineer, assistant director of engineering, assistant manager, director of system support services and general manager. He also owns Meridian-based Engineering Support Services LLC.
Henson is a National Society of Professional Engineers member who has represented Mississippi on its governing board. He also has led the Mississippi Engineering Society.
Henson also serves on numerous boards including The Riley Foundation, East Mississippi Business Development Corp., Southeastern Federal Power Customers, Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, and is a former chairman of the board of the Tennessee Valley Public Power Association.
Henson and wife LaNeta are the parents of two children, Brian and Joy, and have two grandchildren. The couple attends Union Baptist Church in Clarke County, where Wayne leads a Sunday School class and serves as a deacon.
For more about MSU-Meridian, visit www.meridian.msstate.edu.
MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.

Office of Public Affairs
MSU-Meridian News Bureau 601-484-0113
Contact: Lisa Sollie
lsollie@meridian.msstate.edu



ECCC Hall of Fame, Annual Award Winners Recognized

East Central Community College in Decatur
ECCC Hall of Fame, Annual Award Winners Recognized
Recipients of Hall of Fame and other honors were recognized during the annual Awards Day program held April 28, 2016, at East Central Community College in Decatur.
Selection to the Hall of Fame is considered the highest honor a student can receive at the college, according to Dr. Billy Stewart, ECCC president, who presented the awards.
“To be considered for the prestigious honor,” Dr. Stewart said, “students must demonstrate exemplary character, superior scholarship, worthy leadership and contribute to the betterment of East Central Community College.”
Hall of Fame inductees for 2016 include: Louise Berryhill of Union, Anthony Emmons of Lake, Hannah Mitchell of Lawrence, Benjamin Pace and Devin Skinner, both of Philadelphia, and Kaylee Yates of Decatur.

Berryhill is a graduate of Newton County High School and the daughter of Richard and Paula Berryhill of Union.
She was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges and received the L.B. Simmons History Award, Conrad Barnes Math and Science Scholarship and Lucille Wood Scholarship.
She serves as vice president of fellowship for Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society and is a drum major for the Wall O’ Sound Marching Band. She is a member of the President’s Council, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau, Concert Choir, Voce vocal ensemble and Catholic Campus Ministries.
Those nominating her wrote, “Louise Berryhill is one of the hardest workers and brightest, most intelligent students on this campus. She excels in all that she does, classes and otherwise. She is involved in many activities and is usually a major part of those activities. She has the most spirit, ambition, and intelligence of any person I know. I cannot think of any one other student who would embody a Hall of Fame student any better than her.”
Emmons is a graduate of Lake High School and the son of Tim and Kathy Emmons of Lake.
He was named to the Phi Theta Kappa All-Mississippi Academic Team and Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges. He received the R.O. and Bertha Hannah Scholarship and the Tony Dobbs Memorial Golf Scholarship, as well as valedictorian, STAR Student, ACT, band and choir scholarships.
He serves as vice president of Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society, treasurer of Warrior Corps, French horn section leader for the Wall O’ Sound Marching Band, tenor section leader for the Concert Choir, and is a member of the Pep Band, EC Encore Players, “Wo-He-Lo” yearbook staff and Student Education Association.
Those nominating him wrote, “Anthony Emmons is a strong representation of East Central Community College and its vision. Through various leadership roles and several educational opportunities, he always strives to be the best that he can be. Instead of working on just himself, he also helps others to strive to do the same. ... His kindness and motivation allow him to better anything around him. … He is a truly exceptional student and an even more exceptional human being. …”
Mitchell is a graduate of Newton County High School and the granddaughter of Earnest and Patty Sue Gibbs of Lawrence. She is the daughter of the late Dedria Mitchell.
She was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges and received the La-Z-Boy Scholarship and John Lambert Neill Memorial Scholarship. She was also awarded scholarships for ACT, choir and band.
She serves as vice president of leadership for Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society, trombone section leader for the Wall O’ Sound Marching Band, alto section leader for the concert choir, head media technician for the Collegians rock and roll band, and is a member of the EC Encore Players, Voce vocal ensemble, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau, Jazz Band and Can Bangers percussion ensemble.
Those nominating her wrote, “Hannah Mitchell lives up to the standard of Excellence with Class. … She has made her mark on East Central by her numerous leadership positions she has earned. … Her mind is set to achieve goals, no matter the obstacle. She excels in her academics and extracurricular activities. She has helped many people by helping them understand things that seem confusing in class. She is willing to help those in need, which speaks for her character.”
Pace is a graduate of Neshoba Central High School and the son of Derek and Patty Pace of Philadelphia.
He was selected to the Phi Theta Kappa All-Mississippi Academic First Team, HEADWAE Student of the Year and was named to Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges. He received the Aaron Ronald Davis Memorial Scholarship, Ben Myers Memorial Scholarship, Classes of 1957, 1958 and 1959 Scholarship and the Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship. In addition, he received awards in both state and national competition for Phi Beta Lambda.
He serves as president of Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society, president of the President’s Council, co-president of Warrior Corps, and is a member of Concert Choir, Theta Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau, Students Against Destructive Decisions and the Baptist Student Union.
Those nominating him wrote, “Ben Pace is an ECCC Warrior through and through. He strives for perfection in all that he does and it is evident in his accomplishments both academically and in the extracurricular activities that he is involved in. … Ben is very unassuming and his hard work and dedication in everything he attempts sets him apart from other students. … Ben is one of the finest students I have had the opportunity to work with at ECCC.”
Skinner is a graduate of Neshoba Central High School and the son of Scott and Angie Skinner of Philadelphia.
He was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges. He received the freshman engineering award and the Ben Myers Memorial Scholarship. He was also selected a freshman and sophomore class favorite.
He serves as president of Alpha Alpha Epsilon engineering club, vice president of the sophomore class, co-captain of the tennis team, co-president of the Baptist Student Union and a leader for the BSU drama team. He is a member of Theta Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda, Warrior Corps, President’s Council and Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society.
Those nominating him wrote, “Devin Skinner is a person of great quality and substance. … He treats everyone who he meets with friendliness and he does not ever seem to meet a stranger. … Devin is very committed to doing the best that he can in the classroom because he knows that his studies are one of the keys to fulfilling his dreams. … By holding leadership positions in several organizations on campus, he strives to lead and be a positive example in the lives of others on campus. … ”
Yates is the daughter of Karen Robertson of Decatur and the late Mickey Yates.
She was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges. She received the Leon Eubanks KALJYC-Peers Scholarship and the Bonnie P. Saxton Scholarship. She was also selected a freshman class favorite and a sophomore Homecoming maid.
She serves as president of the Student Body Association, co-president of the Baptist Student Union, vice president of the President’s Council and is a member of Concert Choir, Centralettes dance line, Theta Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda, Warrior Corps, Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society and the “Wo-He-Lo” yearbook staff. In addition, she served as vice president of her freshman class.
Those nominating her wrote, “ … I can think of no one who has been more involved and more dedicated to East Central Community College than Kaylee Yates. Not only has she been a fully involved and committed member of numerous campus clubs and organizations, she has also put every effort into maintaining a high GPA with plans to finish her degree and attend physical therapy school. I have no doubt that whatever Kaylee does in her future, she will not only make her alma mater proud, but she will be a loyal alumna as well. … ”
Additional honors presented during Awards Day include the following:
Career award recipients include Josh Crutcher of Sebastopol, residential carpentry; Christina McKinnion of Noxapater, cosmetology and Career Student of the Year; and Tristan Clay Willis and Tina Vaughn, both recipients of the Welding & Cutting "Taylor Cup.”
Technical awards were presented to Jordon Prisock of Louisville, collision repair technology; Jacob Robinson of Meridian, automotive technology; Malinda Harris of Newton and Sharon Bout of Decatur, co-recipients of early childhood education technology; Alan Graham of Forest, electrical technology; Jay Riser of Forest, heating and air conditioning technology; Tamara Boydstun of Louisville, culinary arts technology; Karen Cleveland of Decatur, hotel and restaurant management technology; Bay White of Sturgis and Samuel Kelly of Union, manufacturing and machining technology; Caleb Terry of Newton, network support technology; and Laren Copeland of Walnut Grove, Technical Student of the Year.
Recipients of healthcare education awards include Kelsey Porter of Morton, associate degree nursing Outstanding Achievement; Shantel Body of Newton, practical nursing; and Michael Eichelberger of Conehatta, paramedic technology.
Those receiving special awards were Ben Pace of Philadelphia, Citizenship Award and Dr. Margaret Mosal for Leadership Scholarship; Kaitlyn Ware of Lake, Ann Burkes Phi Theta Kappa Scholarship; Aaron Scoggin of Lawrence, Alford J. Deaton Physics Award; Louise Berryhill of Union, Richard Fisher Organic Chemistry Award; Erica Myers of Philadelphia and John Thames of Decatur, co-recipients, East Central Environmental Club Award; Anna Claire Housley of Morton, Astronomy Club Award; Randy Phillips of Jackson, Anthony Coleman Men’s Basketball Award; Kellen Clark of Chunky and Brittany Rasco of Pascagoula, co-recipients, Roy Pete Award for Soccer; Sarah Laird of Meridian, ECCC Concert Choir Award; Kirk Griffin of Union, EC Encore Players Award; Chris Kelley of Newton, ECCC Gospel Choir Award; Charlie Wilcher of Carthage, S. Lebrun Hutchinson Engineering Scholarship; Blake Fortenberry of Forest, Freshman Mathematics Award; Megan Parrish of Pascagoula, Sophomore Mathematics Award; Bruce Hedrick of Newton, Secondary Education Award; Emily Beckham of Philadelphia, Myrtle R. Hutchison Elementary Education Award; Memry Thompson of Morton, Mississippi Business Educators Association Award; Ben Pace, Caleb Brown, CrisAnn Bryan and Katie Hillman, all of Philadelphia, and Madelon Taylor of Louisville, all recipients of Phi Beta Lambda Hall of Fame; Chaney Mills of Hickory, Alyne Simmons Recruitment Grant; Madelon Taylor of Louisville and Hannah May of Little Rock, co-recipients of “The Tom-Tom” Award; and Katie McCool of Louisville, Lucille Wood Scholarship.
Alumni Memorial Awards were presented to Michael Whitlock of Philadelphia, Billy Wayne Baucum Secondary Education Award; John Creekmore of Noxapater, W.A. Coursey, Jr. Engineering Award; Kellen Clark of Chunky, Danny Ray Killens Engineering Award; Scott Main of Meridian, Ruth Carr-Vincent Academic Award for Excellence in Non-Traditional Education; Jacob McNeil of Louin, Alatha Chaney English Award; Paxton Holmes of Morton, Sara Carr Deaton Business Technology Award; Sarah Laird of Meridian, Sue Yarbrough Fulgham Speech Award; Kellen Clark of Chunky, Arno Vincent Award for Academic Excellence in Athletics; Corey Hilliard of Ocean Springs, William S. Giffin Men’s Intramural Award; Johnta’ Hughes of Hattiesburg, Earline Wood Memorial Award for Women’s Basketball; Blaze Gibbs of Brandon, Homer F. Hunter Athletic Managers Award; Jesse Hosket of French Camp, Andrew F. Webb Football Award; Ravion Henry of Carthage, Howard Sessums Men’s Basketball Award; Ben Pace of Philadelphia, Jack B. Mayo Phi Theta Kappa Award; and Samm Thompson of Decatur, Dr. Edwin Miller Medical Services Award.
Faculty Memorial Awards were presented to Katie McCool of Louisville, Aaron R. Davis Memorial Scholarship; Weiying Wang of Noxapater, Frank Edwin & Nena Holt Leatherwood Biology Science Award; Katie McCool of Louisville, Dr. Shelby L. Harris Memorial Scholarship; Carly Dickerson of Louisville, J. Wallace Bedwell Business Award; Lindsey Ayllon of Newton, Frank M. Cross Freshman Chemistry Award; Gage Leifried of Meridian, J. Andy Miller Freshman Engineering Award; Lauren Copeland of Walnut Grove, O.L. Newell Drafting Award; Alisha Tamara Savell of Philadelphia, Charles E. Pennington Business Technology Award; Anastasia Crout of Lake, Robert G. Fick Memorial Scholarship; Lillian Shuler of Carthage, Ruth Hull Memorial Wo-He-Lo Award; Matt Mitchell of Lake, Jamie Clark Memorial Baseball Award; Makenzie Byrd of Sebastopol, Leon Eubanks Kaljyc-Peers Leadership Award; Pashien Kelley-Johnson of Diamondhead, L.B. Simmons History Award; Amanda Creekmore of Newton, Thomas W. Thrash Memorial Scholarship; and Khalil Triplett of Philadelphia, General William Patrick Wilson Academic Scholarship.




ECCC Graduation Scheduled May 6 at Neshoba County Coliseum

Neshoba County Coliseum in Philadelphia
ECCC Graduation Scheduled May 6 at Neshoba County Coliseum
East Central Community College President Dr. Billy Stewart said the college could have another record graduating class, with more than 600 students applying to graduate May 6 when the institution holds its 87th Commencement beginning at 6 p.m. in the Neshoba County Coliseum in Philadelphia.
East Central had its largest graduating class in history in May 2015 when 568 students received diplomas or certificates.
Dr. Stewart said that the final number of graduates will be determined after all applications for graduation are reviewed and final grades for the spring 2016 semester are posted.
Included in the total are those who completed degree requirements following the 2016 spring and the 2015 summer and fall terms, according to Dr. Teresa Houston, vice president for instruction.
Those participating in the program include graduating sophomores Pashien Kelley-Johnson of Diamondhead, who will give the invocation; Benjamin Pace of Philadelphia, commencement speaker; and Elias Jimmie of Choctaw, benediction. Presenting the musical selection “You’ll Never Walk Alone/Climb Every Mountain” will be graduating sophomores Louise Berryhill and Kirk Griffin, both of Union, Taylor Lott of Forest, Hannah Mitchell of Lawrence, Ryan Mott and Kaylee Yates, both of Decatur; Madelon Taylor of Louisville, Anna Claire Webb of Noxapater, and Pace. Nina LaBlue of Conehatta will play the trumpet.
This year’s Commencement will also be available for viewing on live stream video by visiting ECCC’s website at www.eccc.edu.
Dr. Houston will present candidates for graduation and Dr. Stewart will award degrees and certificates to the following:
CANDIDATES FOR MAY GRADUATION
(by hometown)
BRANDON: Jacob Huff, Marcus T Johnson Jr. and Sarah Jennifer LaRochelle;
CARROLLTON: Patrick Knox Morrison;
CARTHAGE: Hunter Brown,Thomas Weston Brown, Joseph Burgess, Demetrius Shantez Clark, Chelsea RayJean Cleveland, Mia Coleman, Emily Delana Crane, Kristen Chipley Dowell, Ariel Claress Enoch, Philip Wayne Evans, Haley Ezelle, Taurus Gray, Jamari Green, Evangeline Turner Harvey, Ravion Xavior Henry, Keanu L. Hoye, Wesley Kyle Jelen, Shannon Keene, Tristen King, Austin Moss, Ryan Shayne Moss, Darnell Veshion Artez Myrick, Taylor Gene Nazary, Thomas Nazary, Joshua Peoples, Madie Pigg, Kaitlin Pittman, Candace Mae Reeves, Enoc Pablo Reynoso, Letecia M. Rome, Kayla Jean Searcy, Lillian Nichole Shuler, Jimmy Lee Tangle, Jr., Chloe Thaggard, Jessie McCleary Verry, Brandon Wilcher, Keely Lynn Wilcher, Corey Wilder and Delia Q. Wilder;
CHOCTAW: Latonya Denise Bell, Michael Keith Billie, Elias Braden Jimmie and Nashima Breann Thompson;
CHUNKY: Destinee Buckley, Joseph Kellen Clark, Kayla Kennedy, JoHannah Smith, Shala Smith, Christy D. Stewart;
CLARKSDALE: Euphrates Jiuawnique Jones;
CLINTON: Michael R. Davis;
COLDWATER: Lacey H. Field;
COLLINS: Peyton Lott;
COLLINSVILLE: Tommy L. Griffin, Leslie Kinney, Benjamin Derek Pace and Mason Grant Wooldridge;
CONEHATTA: Whitney Ann Billings, Tanner Davis, Courtney S. Johnson, Nina Gabriel LaBue, LaShayla McMillan, Caylin Loriann Nickey, Emily LeAnn Shoemake, Shawn Anthony Smith and Reagan Warren;
DECATUR: Colby W. Amis, Erick Keith Bishop, BriiAnna Bout, Sharon Bout, Faith Lauren Brown, Latoya Brown, Kaley Anne Bufkin, Quanzavious Trevon Caples, Leah Chandler, AnnaLea Marie Clarke, Antonio Curry, Brandon Davis, Haley Dawkins, Jason M. Forrest, Savannah Marie Glover, Lyndsey LJ Gooden, Hailey Nicole Mamrick, Rachael Havard, Kaitlyn Holmes, Mary-Grace Jones, Hamzeh Husam Khader, Alana R. Knowles, Lalah McMullan, Samuel James Mitchell, Regan Curtis Monk, William Ryan Mott, James Nathan Nance, Keion M. Peoples, Lindsey Savell, Chantelle D. Shelton, Stephen Stewart, John Abel Thames, Caleb Scott Vaughn, Katina Windham and Kaylee Elizabeth Yates;
DEKALB: Quantel Deaton;
DUCK HILL: George Brown Jr.;
EDWARDS: James Fitzgerald McGee;
ELLISVILLE: Lindsi DiAnn Coleman;
FLORENCE: Kayla B. Anderson and Durham Alexander Norman;
FOREST: Logan Cain Alford, William Arender, Jasmine Nicole Bobbitt, Acacia Brown, Kelsey Cox, Candice Brianna Crimm, Shanna Cromwell, Shaquille T. Evans, Katherine Fortenberry, Alan M. Graham, Calvin C. Harris, Lindsay Leann Hedge, Crystal Roxanna Hernandez, Lazaro Hernandez Jr., Ryan Scott Hill, Ryan Scott Hill, Stephanie Katrina Holifield, Shanetria Symone Ickom, Alexander Leon, Taylor Ryan Lott, Christain Mazique, Nicholas Dewitt Monk Jr., Adrianna Mosley, Constance N. Perkins, Chandler McLaurin Powell, Bryce Logan Power, Brittney Rachel Rawson, Casey Nichole Reed, David Reyes, Jay Riser, De'Angelo M. Shepherd, Peggy Wilkerson Sims, Tyler G. Sullivan and Trace Wade;
GULFPORT: Pashien Simone Kelley-Johnson and Carrissa Stevenson;
HARPERVILLE: Louis Tolbert, Jr.;
HATTIESBURG: Jamylia McLemore, Hunter Soileau, Samantha Rae Duncan, Mahalia Shane Gibson, Johnta' Dominique Hughes and Pilar D. Lyas;
HICKORY: Melanie Lorraine Brashier, Benjamin Tyler Brown, Peyton Cain, Kelly Leigh Chapman, Everett Fisher, Gary Levell Johnson Jr., Jace Allan Parker, Alexa Roberts, Nacole Pritchett Simmons,Tabitha Walker and Courtney Williams;
JACKSON: Kelly Buchanan, Koren R. Butler and Randy Poppa Phillips;
KOSCIUSKO: Roshumbria Nash;
LAKE: Taylor Bone, Elwando Brown, Rachel Ann Clay, Bryant Terry Crosby, Anthony Curtis Emmons, Emily Faith Emmons, Zachary Emmons, Whitney M. Fountain, Rico Wade Graydon Jr., Cody Welch Hollingsworth, Tallie Johnston, Shelby J. McGrew, Matthew Lucas Mitchell, Jasmine Moore, Melanie S. Moore, Kimbrianna Spivey, Allie Roxanne Turner, Danny E. Ware, Dalton Shea Wilson and Colby Scott Yarbrough;
LAMAR: Richenda L. Crutcher;
LAUREL: Courtney Harper and Ashley Leann Seals;
LAWRENCE: Carson Lyles Bounds, Daneisha S. Fulton, Hannah Grace Mitchell, Hanah Gilmer, Micah Kolby Tillman, James P. Travassos, Anthony D. Valentine, and Samuel Ryan Williams;
LENA: Blake Barnes, Shelly Dowell, Randell Brice Morgan, Mya Coceder Smith and Casaundra White Lena;
LITTLE ROCK: Duster J. Allgood, Christian Blum, Quenten Tyler Brown, Matthew D. Cress, Troy Gregory, Hannah Cathryn May, Elisha A. McDaniel, Kasey Marie Miller, Jessica Leighanne Powell and Kory Swift;
LOUIN: Jacob Blayne McNeil;
LOUISVILLE: Taylor Alexander, David Karl Boydstun, Tamara Boydstun, Dustin Burton, Tiara Faith Coleman, Kayla Covington, Ashley Burch Dickerson, Carly Denise Dickerson, Darius Dora, Lawanna L. Edwards, Laken Fulcher, Emily Logan Gregory, Kira Hardin, Joelie Fay Hill, Quanaeqa S. Hunt, Cody Glenn Johnson, Dylan Jones, Jamey Lea Kinard, John Calvin Lipsey, Michael Stephen Miller, Margaret LaRose Morris, Morgan Ashleigh Orr, Rebecca Rodman, Daphne Sanders, Chandlor Dale Swearingen, Madelon Dianne Taylor, D'Atra Chanteal Triplett, LaKendrick Vaughn and Channing Wall;
MACON: Reagan Dawn Fleming;
MAGEE: Addie Sarah Ambrosier and Cayla Emily Myers;
MERIDIAN: Shelby Lauren McKelvaine, Sharee Nickole Parrish-Parker, Samuel J. Robinson, Jamie Collie Mathis, Nikki Chenise Cole, Terrell Palmer and Miracle Rushing;
MORTON: Jennifer Argueta, Brittany Bryan, Hope Martine Craft, Skylar Davidson, Jayson Scott Dempsey, Evan Cooper Derrick, John Hill, Jimmy Wayne Jones Jr., Morgan Allane Jones, Mahari Kincaid, Wesley C. Mattix Jr., Zachary Ryan Moore, James O'Cain, Kayla Sudduth, Memry Estelle Thompson, Tina Marie Vaughn, Neely Anne Watford and Kelsey Faith Porter;
NEWTON: Catherine R. Arrington, Kadarias Buckley, Zack Hammons, Malinda Harris, Jelisa D. Hillie, Christopher Lance Kelley, Lamont David May, Zachary Alexander Munn, Trenea Pruitt, Miriam Ann Rivers, Charles Roebuck, Shannon St. Clair, Caleb C. Terry, Lisa Deshun Walker and Jennifer Marie Watkins;
NOXAPATER: Candace Barrett, Steven C. Curtis Jr., Hanna Hamilton, Ashley Nicole Hill, Sarah Johnson, Chase Jordan, Brooke Smith, Taylor Smith, Brady Thomas, Sara Dawn Thorne, Anna Claire Webb, Anna Katherine Wells, Michael Dewayne Yates Jr. and Brian Austin Rushing Snow;
OLIVE BRANCH: Megan Yarbrough;
PASCAGOULA: Prince Charles McDaniel, Katherine Ashlynn Moran, Brittany Leigh Rasco, Megan Cimone Parrish and Jamar Simms;
PASS CHRISTIAN: Gabrielle Stapp;
PELAHATCHIE: Kayley Pennington;
PETAL: Caitlyn Aldous, Austin Franklin and Erin Golden;
PHILADELPHIA: Butch R. Adcock, Rachel J. Alexander, Brittany Deshea Anderson, Faith Boyette Anderson, Tanesha Niecy Barham, Cole Barnes, Chasity Madison Barrier, Fallon L. Beckham, Shannon Brazzle, Caleb Brown, Christy Anna Bryan, Mykitia Burrage, Pat Burrage, Ayla Destini Burton, Miranda Kay Carpenter, Dareyl Kanard Carter Jr., Miranda M. Clark, Mary Katherine Collins, Ivey C. Commer, Alexey Danilov, Katlyn Nichole Duke, Tammie Easley, Luke Hardy Eldridge, Ibrahim Obaid Elnaham, Keona Foster, Kaelin Alexandria Gentry, Grant Gordon, Sarah Kathleen Hall, Shelby Renee Hemphill, Cassie S. Henson, Kathryn Hillman, Sydney Keith, Colt Andrew Kilpatrick, John Mark Kilpatrick Jr., Ashley Lawrence, Layne Marie Lepard, Anna Lewis, Christina Marie Lewis, Christian Little, Jaice K. Marsh, Hosea C. McBeath, Brandon McCarty, Ben McDaniel, John W. Meazell, Karliscia Uzuri Moore, Erica Daniella Myers, Lanna Parker, Kendrell Peden, Casaja Marie Phillips, Taylor Leigh Phillips, Hannah Marie Pilgrim, Daniel T. Powell, Chasity Wedgeworth, Jacob Rosales, Keona Sanders, Alisha Tamara Savell, Michael Devin Skinner, Clarissa Smith, Wesley Smith, James Dylan Spears, Warlchez Spencer, Truvette Cobb Thompson, Janera Clarice Triplett, Jeannie Triplett, Mahlih Vaughn, Gloria Nohemi Velez, Heather K. Watkins, Jeremy Watkins, Kimberly Renee Watkins, Dianna Wesley, Michael Whitlock II, Peyton Williamson, Shaneisha Renay Willis and Tristan Willis;
PRESTON: Karla L. Higginbotham;
PULASKI: Heather Russum Hayman, Stephanie Michelle Hord, Victoria Megan McNeal and Spencer Tullos;
QUITMAN: Mallory A. Lee, Jelisa Bre'kenya Pearson and Mecklin D. Soules;
RALEIGH: Raven Alexia Strong and Justin Thornton;
RICHLAND: Maya Erecca Cole;
RIDGELAND: Summer Lavender;
SALLIS: Caitlyn Bree Burnley;
SALTILLO: Abimael Rivera Romero;
SEBASTOPOL: Ashley Barber, Nathanael Hall Barber, Natalie Jane Guidry and Cody Brown Shaw;
SENATOBIA: Andrea Gale Hannaford;
STARKVILLE: Raphael McClain;
STATE LINE: Dylan Snypes;
STONEWALL: Randy Creighton;
STURGIS: Bay White;
SUMRALL: Jordan Malik Thomas;
TERRY: Shavonda Charde Fields;
TOOMSUBA: Aaliyah Samone Smith and Aaliyah Smith;
TUPELO: Isaiah Traylor, Carlos Abrahan Gutierrez Alonso, and Omar Gutierrez Alonso;
UNION: Adriana Alderson, Kristy Alexander, Raven JoAnn Bane, Agatha Louise Berryhill, Ashley Bozeman, Jason Corbett Bradley, Josh Crutcher, Aaliyah Monique Cunningham, Toby Luke Edwards, Kirkland Griffin, Kristen L. Hawks, Madison Herrington, Stephen Ralph Horne, Samuel A. Kelly, Will Kennedy, Mary Elizabeth Levin, David Houston Martin III, Matthew Scott Mason, Keri Ann Mayfield, Breanna McBeath, Jennifer McCraw, Brady McElhenney, Colby Morris, Karleigh Moss, Brooke Elizabeth Payne, Maggie Claire Peebles, Kia Rogers, Caleb Scharer, Tyler Dale Sistrunk, Christopher Smith, Colby Alan Todd, Zachary Lee White and Karey Williams;
WALNUT GROVE: Aleiaha Kasha Bloodsaw, Krystan Leah Bolton, Jennifer Lynn Burns, Amber Hayley Chandler, Lauren Taylor Copeland, Ashland Brooke Ellington, Jasmine KeAnna Nicole Jones, Shelly Rebecca Kyzar, Molly A. Neal, Dekendrick Darvege Rushing, Todd Smith, Edward Spivey, Dezmon Summers, Carrie Virginia Summers-Jones, Erin Thornton, Brittany Thrash and William Wragg;
WEIR: Pamela Nanette Lane;
WEST POINT: Maegen Elizabeth Ellis;
WINONA: Joshua Adam Carpenter;
YAZOO: Chelsea Covington Wright;
BRENT, AL: Terry Ray Lockett Jr.;
MONTGOMERY, AL: Robert Lee Johnson;
MOODY, AL: Leslie Randelle Asmus;
OXFORD, AL: Derek Quintez Mahaffey;
MEMPHIS, TN: Derrick D. Dandridge Jr.;
MIDLAND, TX: Mitzi C. Kirk;
DESTREHAN, LA: Jacob Burrows Johnson; and
KILBOURNE, LA: Lacey Renee Hill.
DECEMBER 2015 GRADUATES
BRANDON: Kardarius Santedrick Evans-McClendon, Micah Jett Parten and Brett Michael Warren;
CARTHAGE: MaChasity S. Leflore, Vincent Hernandez May, Johnny Lee Stephens III and Calvin Trevon Tate;
CHUNKY: Colby Skelton;
CLINTON: Con'Brianna T. Evans;
COLLINS: Jerry Magee Jr.;
COLUMBUS: Austin B. Mize;
CONEHATTA: Andreka M. Buie and Dakota Nita Osie Hicks;
DALEVILLE: Keith Hudson;
DECATUR: Brandy Shelanda Graham, Lahoma L. Hawkins, Anthony Trell Wansley and O'Sheana Wheaton;
FLORENCE: Christopher M. Yarbrough;
FLOWOOD: Leah Vincent Corhern;
FOREST: Christopher Devonte Brown, Shaquille T. Evans, Kara K. Falcon, Alan Graham, Evany BaRae Gray, Jaylon J. Lofton, Katlyn Brianna Patrick and Bailey Wedgeworth;
FRENCH CAMP: Jesse Hosket;
GOODMAN: Jamal L. Keith;
HATTIESBURG: Aubrey J. Bourn and Allen Lamarr Fails Jr.;
HICKORY: Joseph DeShaun Page, Jace Parker and Kadrian R. Williams;
JACKSON: Eric M. McPherson, Jr. and Treveontae Willis;
LAKE: Pamela Jenny Robinson;
LAUDERDALE: Arkeem Rashawn Johnson;
LAWRENCE: Shaniqua L. Hardy;
LENA: Lorrie Kate Moore;
LOUISVILLE: Richard Colby Eaves, Stanley P. Foster Jr., Ashley B. Grant, Tynneshia Henton, Morgan T. Hillhouse, Angela Jenkins-Coburn, Jordan E. Prisock, William Christian White and Maya'Rose Wilmer;
MAGEE: Zachary Lawrence Graves and Ariana White;
MERIDIAN: Christopher Deion Nathan Evans, Christopher Edward Ivy and Tyisha Monae Sims;
MORTON: Jasmine Nasha Brown, Patrick Ryan Harrell, Lucas Morgan and Alice J. Towner;
NEWTON: Michael A. Buntyn, Eddie Joe Houston III, Toretha Carollynn Norman, DaQuaun "Oshea" Robinson and Karen L. Sims;
PACHUTA: Zachary Edmonson;
PHILADELPHIA: Jennifer Lynn Anderson, Rashada Boler, Matthew Brescia, Scottie Coleman, Shana Chaney Ely, Angela S. Harrison, Robin D. Isaac and Emma Kate Savell;
PRESTON: Ty'Asia La'Treci Nicholson;
TOOMSUBA: Justin Houston;
UNION: Janiya Laque Evans, Brandi Nicole Kilpatrick, Haley Moorehead, Kenneth Brian Stephens and Dustin Yeager;
VICKSBURG: Devontae Malik Wilson;
WALNUT GROVE: Lauren Taylor Copeland, Alexis Alfredo Flores and Tatyana Li'tiese Johnson; and
PINE BLUFF, AR: Kabion Ento;
AUGUST 2015 GRADUATES
BAY SPRINGS: Michael Bender;
CARTHAGE: Den'Nisha K. Harvey, Julianna Elizabeth Ingram, Artesia M. Richmond and Matthew Jerome Sullivan;
CHOCTAW: Erin Marie Cantrell;
COLLINSVILLE: Malorie Hunt;
CONEHATTA: Kelsey Taylor McDonald, Joseph A. Shelley, Mitch B. Shoemake and Daniel Scott Watkins;
DECATUR: Stephen Scott Armstrong II, Christopher Cain, Megan McElhenney and Kalena Yolanda Smith;
FOREST: Arieel Tona Carter, Monica Gray, Tamantha Rae Harris, Kerry Keith Ingle, Abraham Mahdi, Kirstie G. Shaw and Candice Nicole Stewart;
HICKORY: Charles Kirby Bishop;
LAKE: Kasey Logan;
LITTLE ROCK: Leslie Brooke Howington and Summer Jenkins;
LOUISVILLE: Jordan Lovorn and Lauren Marie Whitehead;
MERIDIAN: Brittany Kelly;
MORTON: Tynequa Bryant, Gloriana Latham and Rachel Marie Lopez;
NEWTON: BriAnna V. Buckley, Jurnee Denise Jordan, William Tyler Pace and Jeremy Scott Tune;
NOXAPATER: Robert L. Taylor and Shamari Williams;
PASCAGOULA: Austin Landry Lofton;
PHILADELPHIA: Elizabeth April Abdelgadir, Sarah Cathleen Alexander, Caitlin Bounds, Hailey Coate, Chelsea Doss, Breona Foster, Deanna M. Glass, Jordan Caitlin Jay, Andrew B. Jones, Chance Lovern, Melissa N. Miles, Brianna Peeples, Lauren E. Posey, Cappi Elizabeth Reese, Micheal Andrew Reynolds, Brittany Robinson Stinson, Sharon R. Strait, Jennifer Whatley, Lacey Willis and Elizabeth Withers;
PRESTON: Hansel Bell;
QUITMAN: Asia Jarde' Ruffin;
SAUCIER: Donnie Farmer;
UNION: Jonathan Adkins, Katelynd Elizabeth Andrews, Ryan D. Burkes, Jessie Hennington, Nikki Tucker and Teoneka Marsha Wallace;
WALNUT GROVE: Hannah Elizabeth Kersgaard; and
YAZOO CITY: Kiese DeAndre Kirkland




As support for ‘Infinite Impact’ soars, Mississippi State extends fundraising campaign goal to $1 billion

Miss. State - Starkville, MS
As support for ‘Infinite Impact’ soars, Mississippi State extends fundraising campaign goal to $1 billion

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Inspired by the overwhelming response to “Infinite Impact” ― the most successful fundraising campaign in university history ― Mississippi State University President Mark E. Keenum announced a historic retargeting of the campaign with a fundraising goal of $1 billion by 2020 during a news conference today [April 28] on campus.
“When the campaign opened to the public six years ago, supporters stepped up like never before to demonstrate their belief in Mississippi State’s bold vision for the future,” said Keenum. “Donors representing virtually all walks of life in the MSU community helped achieve the $600 million fundraising goal far ahead of schedule, and the momentum continues.
“Now it’s time to raise the bar even further in our journey to become one of the nation’s leading research universities,” Keenum said. “We know we can count on the support of our generous donors to help us secure an additional $400 million in gifts by 2020.”
Keenum said donations to Mississippi State are investments in the future as student-led research teams continue making groundbreaking strides in a number of fields with local, national and global impacts. Mississippi State scientists are designing the eco-friendly “Car of the Future,” finding a cure for pandemic flu, developing concussion-free helmets, and partnering with NASA on future space exploration.
Mississippi State has been in the top 10 nationally in agriculture-related research for more than 15 years and is applying its vast body of knowledge to find solutions for world hunger and food security. The university also serves as the national lead for the FAA’s Center of Excellence for Unmanned Aircraft Systems, and last year Boeing selected MSU’s Raspet Flight Research Laboratory for relocation of their Stitched Resin Infusion Composite Research Center.
The success of Infinite Impact has helped expand scholarship programs for students across the spectrum from differing economic backgrounds and driven sweeping improvements in all spheres of campus life, including academics, athletics, the arts, and facilities and infrastructure.
“Infinite Impact is being fueled by donors who want to make a positive difference in the lives of people everywhere,” said John Rush, MSU’s vice president for Development and Alumni. “With their support, Mississippi State has become more competitive and successful in its efforts to recruit top-performing students and faculty who will continue building our legacy of academic excellence.”
With record enrollment last fall, MSU also welcomed the largest and most academically advanced freshman class in school history. This month, MSU seniors Natalie Jones of Flowood and Johnie Sublett of Pensacola, Florida, were recognized as Truman and Goldwater scholars, respectively, two of the nation’s most prestigious scholarships for students. In 2013, Vicksburg native Donald “Field” Brown became MSU’s second Rhodes Scholar, the world’s most celebrated and prestigious international fellowship.
Since the launch of Infinite Impact, Mississippi State athletes have achieved unprecedented milestones. The Bulldogs vied for the 2013 national baseball championship, and the following year the football team held the No. 1 national ranking for five consecutive weeks. This year, the women’s basketball team achieved its highest national ranking in university history on its way to the NCAA’s Sweet 16.
Mississippi State also is a powerful economic driver for the state of Mississippi. Last year MSU’s Bagley College of Engineering announced an international collaboration in automotive materials engineering with the Universitie Internationale de Rabat in Morocco. MSU and the state of Mississippi are exploring opportunities to enhance education, research and economic development through the new relationship.
“What we’re doing drives Mississippi,” said Earnie Deavenport, an alumnus and chair of the Mississippi State University Foundation board who is the retired chairman and CEO of Eastman Chemical Company. “We’re an economic engine for the state and a key asset in building Mississippi’s profile as a research, technology and innovation leader. We plan to build on our momentum by expanding our footprint beyond Mississippi and exploring more opportunities for our students to shape the world of the future.”
Mississippi State continues on the path set forth in the five-year strategic plan adopted in 2012, a plan that renews a commitment to core principles and provides direction for the future — from faculty and student recruitment to cutting-edge research programs to a more diverse, dynamic and enriching campus community.
“The outpouring of support from donors at all levels has been a driving force in Mississippi State’s rise to the top,” Keenum said. “The Infinite Impact campaign has been embraced by a growing community of supporters, and their enthusiasm gets stronger every year. Now we’re taking another bold step forward by asking supporters to recommit to Mississippi State’s future by propelling the Infinite Impact campaign to the $1 billion mark.
“This is not just a financial milestone ― it represents Mississippi State’s aspiration to be the best of the best,” Keenum said. “MSU is well on its way to expanding our position as one of the nation’s premier research universities, and the continued generosity of our donors will make the vision a reality.”
Chartered in 1962, the MSU Foundation administers most of the campus-based fundraising activities and endowment funds. For more on the Infinite Impact campaign, visit www.infiniteimpactmsu.com.
MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.




Morton Students Participate in ECCC Senior Day

East Central Community College
Morton Students Participate in ECCC Senior Day
Morton High School seniors Tavarious James and Paden Horton were among area students who attended East Central Community College’s annual Senior Day activities held recently on the Decatur campus. Also pictured is ECCC Director of Housing and Student Life/Recruiter Amanda Walton. The day’s activities included an information showcase held in the Brackeen-Wood Physical Education Building featuring all campus clubs and organizations as well as information on academic, career, technical and health-related programs. Also on tap were performances by the Collegians rock-n-roll band, Voce vocal ensemble, Jazz Band, Percussion Ensemble, Warrior Cheerleaders and the Centralettes dance line. The event concluded with a complimentary lunch. For more information or to schedule a campus visit, contact Dr. Randall Lee, vice president for student services, at 601-635-6375. The e-mail address is rlee@eccc.edu.




MCC salutes outstanding students ...

Meridian Community College
MCC salutes outstanding students ...
Awards night yields applause and congratulations

Meridian Community College sophomore Walt Herrington received the H.M. Ivy Award from MCC Vice President of Operations Barbara Jones during the College’s Awards Night Program held Tuesday in the McCain Theater.

Herrington, a graduating sophomore, is a University Transfer Program student who plans to pursue a career in education.

The H.M. Ivy Award is given to the most outstanding graduating sophomore. The recipient is active on campus and has shown a positive impact in the school and surrounding area.

The Awards Night spotlighted students who excelled in various programs throughout the 2015-16 academic year. Tapped for awards included:

Daniel Ray, Lucile Reisman Rosenbaum Memorial Scholarship; Anna Kathryn Jones, the Robert Cochran Memorial Scholarship; Mary Kaytee Nelson, the Royalty Education Scholarship; Joshua S. Johnson, the Sammy Broadhead Memorial Scholarship; Mallory Harmon, Ian Garner and Chanler Pickering, MCC Faculty Staff Association Awards; Daphna Allen, Freshman Military/Veteran of the Year; Paul Robinson, Sophomore Military/Veteran of the Year; Michael Bell, G.V. “Sonny” Montgomery Foundation Scholarship Award; William Pierce, Chuck Nicholson Community Bank Veteran Scholarship;

Emilio Luna Suarez, Outstanding Biological Science Student; Joshua S. Johnson, Business Student of the Year; Ian Garner, Maude Smith English Award; Tori Wolverton, Sue Key Excellence in Mathematics Award; Caleb Landrum, Music Major Student of the Year; Tori Wolverton, Outstanding Physical Sciences Student; Jessica Crevitt, Jimmie Evans Social Science Award; Morgan Wall, Outstanding Theater Student; Cara McQuaig, Outstanding Visual Fine Arts Student;

Cash Matlock, Outstanding Broadcast Communications Student; Matthew Kittrell, Outstanding Business and Marketing Management Technology Student; Barbara A. Holiday, Outstanding Business and Office Technology Student; Jason Ledean McPherson, Commercial Truck Driving Program Best All Around Driver; Carol Lee Huggins, Commercial Truck Driving Most Improved Driver; Jodi Pope, Outstanding Cosmetology Program Student; Megan Gressett, Outstanding Dental Assisting Student; Candice White, Meridian Area Dental Association Scholarship; Katherine Manno, Outstanding Dental Hygiene Student; Brandon Prince, Outstanding Drafting and Design Technology Student; Kelsey Lucas, Ann Tucker Early Childhood Education Scholarship; Kalynne Bracey and Angela F. Davis, “Star Polisher” Early Childhood Education; Cody Shirley, Outstanding Electrical Technology Student; Yue Lu “Moon,” Outstanding Electronics Technology; Kevin J. Miller, Outstanding Fire Protection Technology Student; Justin D. Roberson, Outstanding Graphic Design Technology Student; Alena Wash, Outstanding Health Care Assistant Student, Fall 2015; Harley Todd, Outstanding Health Care Assistant Student, Spring 2016; Dawn Barker, Outstanding Health Information Technology Student; Brian Kennedy, Outstanding Industrial Maintenance Technician Student; Shawna M. Jenkins, Outstanding Information Systems Technology Student; Candace Davis, Outstanding Medical Assisting Technology Program Student; Alysia Shaw, Medical Laboratory Technology Student of the Year; Thresa M. Jones, Outstanding Medical and Office Technology Student; Shaquanta Boyd, Excellence in Practical Nursing, Fall 2015; Kristen Holmes, Excellence in Practical Nursing, Spring 2016; Kelly Goszkowicz, Margaret Armstrong Excellence in Nursing, Fall 2015; Allison Davis and Christie Presley, Margaret Armstrong Excellence in Nursing, Spring 2016; Jeremy Pogue, Outstanding Paramedic Student; Sam Hudnall, Outstanding Physical Therapist Assistant Student; Beau Corella, Outstanding Precision Manufacturing and Machining Technology Freshman; Kyle Stiefel, Outstanding Precision Manufacturing and Machining Technology Sophomore; Jason McCans, Outstanding Radiologic Technology Program Student; Sarah Keyes, Respiratory Care Practitioner Program Student of the Year; Danielle Creighton, Outstanding Surgical Technology Student; Jaimarcus Randle, Outstanding Telecommunications Service Technology Student; Danielle Nap, Outstanding Welding and Cutting Technology Student;

Campus organizations were also saluted with the presentation of the B.G. Raden Memorial Award given to the top three outstanding groups. The groups named were Phi Beta Lambda Information Systems Technology, Student Association of Dental Hygienists and Phi Theta Kappa.

Daniel Ray and Alexis Rivers, Outstanding Ivy League Student Recruiters; Chelsea Angel Thornton and Jaylon Keys, Outstanding Student Athletes; Thomas Walter Harrington and Mary Katherine Nelson, Scholar Athletes of the Year; Mallory Harmon, Phi Theta Kappa Courtyard of Scholars Recipient; Walt Harrington, first team and Devin Logue, second team, All-Mississippi Community College Academic Team; and Alysia Shaw and Otis Gowdy, Higher Education Appreciation Day Working for Academic Excellence (HEADWAE).

Recipients of Who’s Who Among Students in American Community and Junior Colleges were also named. They were: Brittany Allen, Matthew Berler, Jami Daugherty, Regan Dupre, Rebecca Estes, Brandon Evans, Ashley Fedrick, Ian Garner, Paige Gibson, Clayton Gray, Fisher Gray, Trace Hamby, Tyus Harden, Thomas Walter Harrington, Austin Harrison, Heather Harwell, Daniel Hill, Sophie Hodge, Derek Hoffman, Ronald Holloway, Kristen Hull, Anna James, Joshua Johnson, Lakia Jones, Ryan Lane, Ryder Leifried, Devon Logue, Megan Mallette, Adrianna Mendoza, Michael Meyers, Steven Adam Motes, Kaytee Nelson, Chanler Pickering, Shelby Proaps, Daniel Ray, Grant Renegar, John Ricks, Victoria Riebock, Alexis Rivers, Esmeralda Rodriguez, Alana Sanders, Alysia Shaw, Shamiah Sims, Dalton Smith, Drew Smith, Morgan Wall, Tyler Weeks, Emily Williams and Tori Wolverton.

-- Kay Thomas
Director of College Promotions
Meridian Community College
910 Highway 19 North
Meridian, MS 39307
601-484-8689
kthomas@meridiancc.edu



MCC Events Calendar

Meridian Community College
MCC Fine Arts Students Exhibit/Competition Reception is set for Tuesday, April 26, from 4-5:30 p.m. In the Miller Art Gallery. John Marshall is the contact person.

The College's Awards Night is Tuesday, April 26, at 6 p.m. In the McCain Theater. Patrick Lovette is the contact person.

The Arts & Letters Series will host the Dimensions concert Thursday, April 28, at 7 p.m. In the McCain Theater. Dr. Todd Brand is the contact person.

-- Kay Thomas
Director of College Promotions
Meridian Community College
910 Highway 19 North
Meridian, MS 39307
601-484-8689
kthomas@meridiancc.edu




ECCC Retirees Look Forward To New Activities

East Central Community College
ECCC Retirees Look Forward To New Activities
East Central Community College faculty and staff members Vicki Blaylock, Tina Harris and Dr. Evadna Lyons are each looking forward to new and varied activities when they retire at the end of the 2015-16 term.
Blaylock joined the ECCC staff as choral director/vocal instructor in 2000 and also serves as Fine Arts Division chairperson. She has completed 33 total years in the field of education.
As with many who have worked in education for so long, Blaylock said it’s the students and her colleagues she will miss most.
“Retirement is bittersweet,” she said. “East Central has two great things: wonderful students and great people working here. It will seem strange to give up my identity as someone’s music teacher. That may be the hardest adjustment but life is comprised of chapters and it is time for me to move to the next chapter.”
Those students have also been the best part of her job.
“The thing I have enjoyed most is teaching music to my students and watching them grow to produce a musical program that touches others.”
She added, “If I could give advice to my students it would be to choose a career that you enjoy getting up and doing each day. That has been the biggest blessing for me. For me, my work as a music educator was not a job. It was fun every day.”
Her retirement plans include family, church and hobbies.
“I look forward to visiting my parents, my 96-year-old grandmother, my sister and others. I plan to get more involved with church activities and spend time with my hobbies, including reading, refinishing furniture and playing my new grand piano.”
After her husband, Ronnie, retires, Blaylock said they plan to retire to western North Carolina and hope to volunteer with the Red Cross.
The Blaylocks have two grown children: Clanton and Anna-Rose.
Harris has served as basic skills specialist in the college’s Workforce Development Center since 2001. She has completed 25 years total in education.
When asked her thoughts as she nears retirement, she said, “I never thought I would retire this young, but I am so excited to begin this new phase of my life.”
She said her plans include spending more time with her husband, Britt, and family, studying her Bible and working to become healthier.
“The one thing I look forward to most in retirement is being able to rest. I take medicine that makes me tired and sick a lot. I don’t have energy to do anything except work now. I want to cook supper and clean house and would also like to teach and/or tutor part-time.”
Like those before her, Harris says it’s the people who have made her job enjoyable.
“I love working with the community, people in industry and the students at East Central. That is what I will miss most.”
Lyons joined the ECCC faculty as an associate degree nursing instructor in 2009 and has completed 28 years in education
Reflecting on her career and upcoming retirement, Lyons said, “I am grateful that God enabled me to fulfil my passion and purpose in life by teaching and being able to retire in early middle age. I truly love teaching students and I could literally teach for free. I also reflect on the challenging times that have occurred in my career and realized that though obstacles exist, God will always carry you through. I have been an instructor, director, professor, and program head, but the most important title that I have acquired is that of ‘teacher.’ I am proud to have touched the lives of thousands of nurses in Mississippi.”
She added, “I have enjoyed teaching the students from the five-county area of East Central Mississippi. The students are intelligent, caring, compassionate and, most of all, have excellent manners.”
In her retirement, Lyons said she hopes to take as many trips to the Florida beaches as possible and eventually would love to write a book, teach online and teach wellness education classes.
Lyons also said of her career, “It is important to give people opportunities based on their skills and talents. I was given an opportunity to teach at a very young age. This opportunity has allowed me to continue to grow and become an expert educator who has achieved a terminal degree. I am grateful that Dr. (Bill) Scaggs welcomed me with open arms into the wonderful world of educating students at the community college level over 28 years ago.”
Retirees and other award recipients will be honored at the college’s end-of-the-year faculty and staff luncheon scheduled May 6 in Mabry Cafeteria.




MSU alumna in Meridian named national Milken Educator

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MSU alumna in Meridian named national Milken Educator


STARKVILLE, Miss.—A Mississippi State graduate with two degrees from the university is the state’s 70th selection for a prestigious national Milken Educator award.
Rhonda R. Burrage, who teaches at Meridian’s Magnolia Middle School, earned a mathematics education degree in 2003 and master’s in secondary mathematics in 2010.
Known as “the Oscars of teaching,” the annual recognition program was established in 1987 by the California-based Milken Family Foundation to reward and inspire excellence in education. Burrage is among 40 honored this year.
Each award is accompanied by a $25,000 check and, to date, more than 2,600 totaling in excess of $65 million have been presented.
Winners also become part of a resource network to assist U.S. policymakers, researchers and members of the news media and general public on matters involving their respective academic subject areas.
At Magnolia Middle, Burrage additionally mentors first-year teachers, tutors students outside of class and chairs the school’s BETA Club. She has not missed a teaching day in the past four years.
Richard Blackbourn, MSU College of Education dean, praised Burrage’s selection. Her achievement exemplifies the quality of teacher education at the 137-year-old land-grant institution, he added.
“We in the College of Education take great pride in this outstanding accomplishment,” Blackbourn said. “Ms. Burrage has worked diligently to perfect her craft, and her students have benefitted greatly from it.”
Jane Foley, senior vice president of the Milken Educator Awards program, also commended Burrage.
“Middle school math can be a challenging subject both to teach and learn, but Rhonda is an exceptional instructor and students are known to thrive in her classroom,” noted Foley, a former public school teacher and principal who holds a doctorate from Purdue University.
Foley also expressed confidence that Burrage will continue to grow as an exemplary Milken Educator and remain a leader in the education field for years to come.
For more information about Milken Foundation and its award program, visit www.milkeneducatorawards.org.
Complete information about MSU’s College of Education and its teacher education programs is found at www.educ.msstate.edu.
MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.




ECCC Announces Inaugural Alpha Delta Nu Inductees

East Central Community College
ECCC Announces Inaugural Alpha Delta Nu Inductees

Ten East Central Community College Associate Degree Nursing students were the first inductees into the college’s newly established Gamma Tau Chapter of the Alpha Delta Nu Honor Society of Nursing at a ceremony held on the Decatur campus in April. The inductees were:
Erin Thornton of Sebastopol, Shelby McKelvaine of Meridian, vice president; Kelsey Porter of Morton, Tanesha Barham of Philadelphia, and Jamie Mathis of Meridian

Kristen Chipley Dowell of Carthage, Madie Pigg of Carthage, president; Peggy Sims of Forest, Christina Lewis of Philadelphia, and Colby Amis of Decatur

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




First Lady Deborah Bryant to Speak at ECCC ADN Pinning Ceremony

E C C C Huff Auditorium on the Decatur campus
First Lady Deborah Bryant to Speak at ECCC ADN Pinning Ceremony


Mississippi First Lady Deborah Bryant will be the keynote speaker for East Central Community College’s annual Associate Degree Nursing Pinning Ceremony scheduled for 4 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, 2016, in Huff Auditorium on the Decatur campus. Approximately 50 students are expected to receive their pins.

“Mrs. Bryant is a strong supporter for healthcare and education in Mississippi. We appreciate her passion and commitment to caring for Mississippians. It is an honor for her to speak to our ADN graduates,” said Denita Thomas, ECCC Dean of Healthcare Education.

Having worked in the medical records profession for more than 39 years, Bryant has a strong passion for the healthcare of all Mississippians and is involved in a wide variety of healthcare events and initiatives.

Since becoming First Lady, Bryant has been involved with various healthcare initiatives including Diabetes Foundation of Mississippi, 2014 "Women of Excellence" Award recipient and Statewide Walk Chair; "Light It Up Blue" for Autism Awareness where the Capitol Dome and Governor's Mansion were illuminated in observance of World Autism Awareness Day in 2014; Susan G. Komen Central Mississippi Race for the Cure, 2012-2013 Honorary Chair; Mississippi Society for Disabilities "Tis the Season", 2014 Honorary Chair; Batson Children's Hospital, Ambassador; University of Mississippi Medical Center Children's Heart Center, Strong Advocate/Supporter; Governor's Healthy Teenage Pregnancy Task Force; and Governor Bryant's 5k Run in Downtown Jackson.




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ in Decatur

Workforce Development Center on the Decatur campus
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ in Decatur
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “How to Develop a Business Plan” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, May 23, 2016, at the Workforce Development Center on the Decatur campus.
Course topics include industry research, description of company products and services, identifying target customer groups, marketing plans, startup costs and preparation of a projected cash flow statement.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu.




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ in Carthage

Carthage Career Advancement Center
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business Plan’ in Carthage
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “How to Develop a Business Plan” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Thursday, May 5, 2016, at the Carthage Career Advancement Center.
Course topics include industry research, description of company products and services, identifying target customer groups, marketing plans, startup costs and preparation of a projected cash flow statement.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Business Issues-Disaster Recovery” in Philadelphia

Neshoba Business Enterprise Center in Philadelphia
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Business Issues-Disaster Recovery” in Philadelphia
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “Business Issues-Disaster Recovery” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, June 14, 2016, at the Neshoba Business Enterprise Center in Philadelphia.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu.




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’ in Decatur

E C C C Development Center on the Decatur campus
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’ in Decatur
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “Starting a Business-First Steps” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, June 27, 2016, at the Workforce Development Center on the Decatur campus.
The seminar outlines the basic steps to start a business. Topics include regulations such as licenses and permits, legal forms of business ownership, basic marketing concepts to help analyze the revenue potential, lending terminology, outline for a business plan and other resources to assist in starting a business.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu




ECCC Choir, Voce Vocal Ensemble to Present Annual Concert April 26

East Central Community College ... Vickers Fine Arts Auditorium
ECCC Choir, Voce Vocal Ensemble to Present Annual Concert April 26


The East Central Community College Concert Choir and Voce vocal ensemble will present their annual spring concert at 7 p.m. Tuesday, April 26, in Vickers Fine Arts Auditorium on the Decatur campus. There is no charge for admission and the public is invited to attend.

The program will be lead by Vicki Blaylock, ECCC fine arts division chair and choral director.

Choir selections will include “Majesty and Glory of Your Name,” “Red, Red Rose” and “Wayfaring Stranger.”

Voce will perform several selections including “I Wish” by Stevie Wonder, “Sittin’ on the Dock of the Bay” by Otis Redding and “Crazy” by Patsy Cline.




ECCC Students Named to All-Mississippi Academic Team

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ECCC Students Named to All-Mississippi Academic Team

East Central Community College sophomores Ben Pace of Philadelphia and Anthony Emmons of Lake were named to the 2016 All-Mississippi Community College Academic Team.

The All-Mississippi Community College Academic Team recognizes scholarly achievements and leadership accomplishments of students enrolled in the state’s two-year colleges.

Pace, a pre-dental major, was one of 15 students named to the First Team. He received a $1,000 scholarship.

His honors include selection as HEADWAE Student of the Year and Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges.

He serves as president of Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society, president of the President’s Council, co-president of Warrior Corps, and is a member of Concert Choir, Theta Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Lambda, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau, Students Against Destructive Decisions and the Baptist Student Union.

Pace is a graduate of Neshoba Central High School and the son of Derek and Patty Pace.

Emmons, a liberal arts major, was one of 42 students named to the Second Team.

He was named to Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges.

He serves as vice president of Theta Xi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa international honor society, treasurer of Warrior Corps, French horn section leader for the Wall O’ Sound Marching Band, tenor section leader for the Concert Choir, and is a member of the Pep Band, EC Encore Players, Wo-He-Lo yearbook staff and Student Education Association.

Emmons is a graduate of Lake High School and the son of Tim and Kathy Emmons.

They were honored along with other outstanding community and junior college students from across the state during an event in Jackson.

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, State Sen. Terry Burton, vice chairman of the universities and colleges committee; Dr. Andrea Mayfield, executive director of the Mississippi Community College Board, and Dr. Lynn Tincher-Ladner, Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society executive director served as distinguished speakers at the recognition luncheon.

Both honorees received medallions, certificates, and printed resolutions from the Mississippi Senate and House of Representatives.

The All-Mississippi Academic Team program is coordinated by Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society, the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior Colleges and the Mississippi Community College Board.




MSU graduate student receives national teaching honor

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MSU graduate student receives national teaching honor

STARKVILLE, Miss.—A Meridian public school educator currently pursuing a Mississippi State graduate degree is receiving a national honor.
Melanie S. Pittman of Carver Middle School is a 2016 selection for the National Association for Alternative Certification’s Teacher Intern of the Year award. A seventh-grade mathematics instructor, she is scheduled to graduate from the university next month with a master’s degree in teaching.
Each year, the Washington, D.C.-based NAAC recognizes three new teachers for demonstrating successful classroom instruction that contributes significantly to the profession. Other winners this year work at schools in Austin and Irving, Texas.
After a decade with the Regions banking system, Pittman said she decided to volunteer with Mississippi Gulf Coast middle schools “to teach financial literacy through a program that Regions offered.” When her family decided to move to Meridian, “I knew it was the perfect time for me to go back to school to get my teaching license,” she said.
Propelled by a passionate belief that all children deserve good teachers, Pittman enrolled in the alternative-route teacher certification program in Mississippi State’s College of Education. The training holds participants to the same standards and coursework requirements that all state teachers must meet.
Associate professor Rebecca Robichaux-Davis recommended Pittman for the NAAC award “because she was one of the best first-year teachers I ever have observed in my 20-plus years of observing pre-service and beginning in-service mathematics teachers.”
Robichaux-Davis is an Auburn University doctoral graduate with earlier degrees completed at Louisiana State and Nicholls State universities. She said Pittman’s passion for teaching is evident from the moment one walks into her classroom.
Pittman admitted recently that “becoming a teacher and actually teaching have been some of the hardest things I ever have done.
“They also have been among the most rewarding,” she quickly emphasized.
For more about MSU’s alternate route teaching certification program, visit www.distance.msstate.edu/mats.
Information on the NAAC is found at www.alternativecertification.org.
MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.




Boys Reign at LCSD’s 1st Annual Keyboarding Competition

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Boys Reign at LCSD’s 1st Annual Keyboarding Competition

When Lauderdale County middle school technology teachers and the district’s Career and Technical Education Director Kevin Cheatham planned the district’s first ever keyboarding competition, no one could have predicted that all of the winners would be boys. But that’s exactly what happened recently when the top four keyboarders from each school competed at Northeast Middle School.
Even more astounding, the top winner, Alex Eaves of Southeast Middle School, keyed 101 correct words per minute! Keying at this speed is an accomplishment for anyone and is especially surprising for an 8th grader.
Robert Ward, president of the Board of Directors of the Phil Hardin Foundation, was on hand to present awards to the winning keyboarders. The PHF recently awarded a grant to Northeast and West Lauderdale Middle Schools, allowing a Technology Foundations lab at each of the two schools to be updated with new computers.
On Friday, April 15, two 7th graders and two 8th graders from each of the four county schools competed for the most correct words per minute at the district’s 1st Annual Keyboarding Competition for middle school students.
Daulton Nelson of NEMS took home the 1st place trophy for 7th graders, and Riley Crawford of WLMS placed 2nd for 7th grade.
Alex Eaves of SEMS was the 1st place winner in the 8th grade round, where Brennyn Robson of NEMS won 2nd place.
Teachers and school officials were both surprised and pleased at the results of this first-ever competition and are already talking about future contests. Cheatham said that future competitions will be held on a rotating basis at each of the county middle schools.
Other participants in the competition were: Dennilyn Hoang and Erin Brown of NEMS; Taylor Buchanan, Gage Buteux, and McKayla Odom of SEMS; Reah Clymer, Conner Smith, and Leigh Wallace of WLMS; and Ean Fisher, Christian Smith, Star Scott, and Lucas Vanderburg of Clarkdale Middle School.




JCJC Magnolia GOLD hosts “A Run in Their Boots” 5K Run/Walk

Jones County Junior College Bobcat Stadium
JCJC Magnolia GOLD hosts “A Run in Their Boots” 5K Run/Walk

ELLISVILLE-The Jones County Junior College Magnolia GOLD Program is hosting its first 5K benefit run on Saturday, May 14, to assist the Wounded Minutemen of Mississippi. The 5K run/walk will be held on the JCJC campus with registration at the Bobcat Stadium at 7 a.m. and the race beginning at 8 a.m. The cost is $30 for participants registering through race-day and $25 for walkers registering through the day of the event. T-Shirts will be provided on a first-come first-served basis.

“As leaders, both at JCJC and our community as a whole, we learn to lead by example. This event gives our students an opportunity to do just that by giving back to our wounded veterans here locally,” said SFC Buster Bounds, who represents the Mississippi Army National Guard and is the MS Magnolia GOLD instructor at JCJC. “Mississippi service members have sacrificed time from their families, jobs and communities in recent years answering the call to serve their state and country. Their efforts come at a high cost, not in dollars and cents, but in the lives of our guardsmen and their families. This 5K benefit run is just a small gesture to give back to a group that has done so much behind the scenes for years. The young soldiers/students in our program are excited about the opportunity to give back to these heroes and are looking forward to the community coming out and joining them in their effort.”

The walk will immediately follow the 5K run. Awards will be given to the: Overall Male and Female, Overall Masters Male and Female, and 1st, 2nd, 3rd place per age division. All walkers participating in the Fun Run will receive a dog-tag ribbon with the Wounded Minutemen military motto. The age groups will be: 17 under, 17-25, 25-30, 31-50, 50-65, and 65-older.

“We are anxiously looking forward to a successful first 5K Wounded Minutemen of Mississippi benefit,” said Bounds.

Registration forms can be picked up at the JCJC OneCard Office, by clicking on the Pine Belt Pacers web page at: http://www.pinebeltpacers.org/RaceInfo/Races16.html#May or by contacting Bounds at 601-310-8923 or email: milton.b.bounds.mil@mail.mil; or contact Lauren Wade at: lauren.wade@jcjc.edu. Other links to visit include: https://www.facebook.com/#!/A-Run-In-Their-Boots-1580912422199239/ and http://www.woundedminuteman.com.

Wounded Minutemen of Mississippi was founded in 2010 and is comprised of Mississippi civilian and military personnel. During the last several years, several hundred units from Mississippi have deployed to either Iraq and/or Afghanistan with some units being deployed on multiple tours. Many of our soldiers have been wounded in action and are now seeking to rebuild their lives as a private citizen. It is the organizations desire to provide financial assistance to these warriors who are having trouble reintegrating into their civilian jobs and community.

As a private, non-profit organization, it is the organization’s mission to honor and empower wounded service members from Mississippi and provide assistance to those who have sacrificed much to defend our freedom.
All, 100-percent of the money donated through, gifts, raffles, and various events is donated to the recipients.

The JCJC Magnolia GOLD Program was created by the MS National Guard and partnered with Jones County Junior College in 2014. The GOLD program offers classes in advanced leadership skills to both military and non-military students. The program was the first of its kind in Mississippi when the MS National Guard partnered with Jones County Junior College in its pilot stage.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




ECCC Students Participate in NASA Program

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ECCC Students Participate in NASA Program

Six members of Alpha Alpha Epsilon engineering club at East Central Community College were recently selected to participate in NASA’s Community College Aerospace Scholars program.

Those selected for the prestigious program at Stennis Space Center April 11-14, 2016, included Kellen Clark of Chunky, John Creekmore of Noxapater, Megan Parrish of Pascagoula and Aaron Scoggin of Lawrence. Lane Wooten of Carthage was selected to attend the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., also held April 11-14. Samuel Mitchell of Decatur will participate at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, May 22-25, 2016.

According to ECCC mathematics instructor and AAE sponsor Michael Miles, “This program gives students an authentic NASA experience that will encourage them to finish a two-year degree or transfer to a four-year university to pursue a NASA-related career.”

To be considered for the program, students had to complete a multi-phase application process. The first phase included an application, letters of recommendation, submission of transcripts and a written essay. Upon acceptance, students then participated in interactive web-based activities including online coursework and webinars.

Those successfully completing the second phase were then allowed to apply for the onsite experience and had to undergo a competitive selection process which was based in part on the online coursework and project papers submitted.

The ECCC students selected worked on a team project mentored by NASA engineers, attended briefings by engineers and scientist, toured NASA facilities, completed a rover competition and much more.




Java & Jazz at JCJC ...

Jones County Junior College ... Bobby Shows Exhibit Hall of the Ronald E. Whitehead Advanced Technology Center in Ellisville
Java & Jazz at JCJC
ELLISVILLE -Two of the small ensemble student groups at Jones County Junior College, JC Jazz along with JC Voices will be continuing a fifteen-year tradition on Thursday, April 28, at 7 p.m. when they present “Java and Jazz” in the Bobby Shows Exhibit Hall of the Ronald E. Whitehead Advanced Technology Center in Ellisville. This concert, featuring JC Jazz, under the direction of interim Director of Bands, Jeff Cannon, and JC Voices, under the direction of Fine Arts Division Chair, Dr. Susan Smith, is free and open to the public.

The jazz band will perform works arranged by Mike Baron, Scott Ragsdale, Dave Barduhn, Andy Clark, as well as pieces composed by retired JC Jazz Band Director, Jeff Brown. Kay Guiles, faculty piano and organ instructor, will accompany JC Voices, who will be honoring Frank Sinatra this year with crowd favorites like “Come Rain or Come Shine,” “My Funny Valentine,” “I’ll Be Seeing You,” and “All the Things You Are.” Student soloists will be featured in both JC Jazz and JC Voices, and a surprise guest artist might even perform with the band.

Java & Jazz promises to be a lively evening with coffee and light refreshments along with jazz of all styles. For more information call the JCJC Fine Arts Department at 601-477-4094.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




MPSD - Upcoming Events - April

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Northwest Middle School Spring Concert
Thursday, April 14 – 6:00 p.m.
Northwest Auditorium

Magnolia Middle School Presents “No Child…”
Thursday, April 14; Monday, April 18; and Tuesday, April 19 – 7:00 p.m.
Meridian High School Auditorium
Admission $5
Students from Magnolia Middle School will present the play “No Child…” The play was written by Nilaja Sun and is directed by Randy Ferino Wayne, Magnolia Band Director.

MPSD Fourth Grade Students Participate in the Meridian Symphony Orchestra Link-Up Program
Friday, April 15 – 9:00 a.m.
MSU Riley Center

Get to College Scholarship Winner Announcement
Thursday, April 21 – 11:10 a.m.
Meridian High School
An MHS student has won a $1,000 scholarship from the “Get to College” Essay Contest. The contest staff will be at MHS to surprise the student and present the check. The student is one of 50 winners that were selected from over 2,000 entries!

Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




ECCC Art Exhibit Opens

East Central Community College Lobby of the Vickers Fine Arts Center
ECCC Art Exhibit Opens

The East Central Community College Art Department will host its 2016 Student Art Exhibition beginning Monday, April 18, through Friday, April 29, in the lobby of the Vickers Fine Arts Center Auditorium.

A reception will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 20, in the lobby of the Vickers Fine Arts Center. Refreshments will be provided by the college’s Culinary Arts department.

The exhibition will feature drawings, paintings, sculpture and designs produced by EC students during the 2015-2016 school year.
Students whose work will be featured include:

Madelyn Ball and Amaziah Sierra, both of Louisville, Blake Barnes of Lena, Sarah Barfield of Walnut Grove, Amber Chaney of Conehatta, BriiAnna Bout of Decatur, Shawna Bush of Lawrence, Jala Hobson of Brandon, Michael Hackett of Union, Madison Kennedy of Little Rock, Kristie Kitchings of Carthage, Sydney Keith of Philadelphia, Kayley Pennington of Pelahatchie, Lauryn Tucker of Pearl and Caleb Welch of Brandon.

Jeffrey Hodges serves as art instructor. For more information, contact Hodges at 601-635-6229 or email jhodges@eccc.edu.




EMCC MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP TO PRESENT MURDER MYSTERY

East Mississippi Community College Scooba campus in the Board Dining Room of the Student Union
EMCC MUSIC THEATRE WORKSHOP TO PRESENT MURDER MYSTERY

Come eat dinner and watch a play during East Mississippi Community College 2016 Music Theatre Workshop’s production of “Dinner at Eight, Dead by Nine.” The play takes place Thursday, April 28, at 7 p.m. at the Scooba campus in the Board Dining Room of the Student Union. A meal is included in the $10 admission cost. During the play, one of the main characters falls over dead in a plate of spaghetti. During the rest of the play, the remaining characters attempt to solve the murder. There will be a special appearance by EMCC Funeral Service Technology students. Tickets need to be purchased by April 18. To purchase a ticket, call Music Theatre Workshop instructor Wendy Smith at (662) 476-5004 or send her an email at wsmith@eastms.edu. Cast members for the play are: front row, from left, Lauren Mott of Caledonia; Eli Hatch of Steens; Pauline Pimolle of Marseille, France; Sarah Watkins of Philadelphia; Hope Smith of McComb; Tamyiah Hibbler of DeKalb; and Taylor Hasson of Meridian. In the back row are, from left, Desiree Savage of Columbus; Ashley Henley of Brooksville; Mary Utz of Columbus; Eddie Franklin of Macon; Ada Bash of Starkville; Anna Lane of Macon; Tremaine Rencher of Scooba; Antonia Cole of Dekalb; and Alicia Robertson of Scooba. Not pictured is Tia Smith of Columbus.




JCJC’s PTK officers earn regional awards

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s PTK officers earn regional awards
ELLISVILLE – Jones County Junior College’s Rho Sigma chapter of the academic international Honor Society, Phi Theta Kappa have earned six awards at the regional conference held recently. With more than 200 members of the organization working to complete various projects and fundraisers, the group was recognized for their efforts as a Top 10 Distinguished Chapter and the officer team was recognized as the runner up, Distinguished Chapter Officer Team. The student chapter officer team includes: Luke Tucker: Vice President of Fellowship-Ellisville; Jonathan Jones: Director of Website-Purvis; Ethan Davis: President-Laurel; Wes Herring: Vice President of Scholarship-Laurel; Adam Wigley: Director of Social Media-Richton; Chase Roberts: Historian, Mize; Kiana McFadden: Vice President of Leadership-Waynesboro; Hannah Boyte: Director of Campus Activities-Sumrall; Geneva Catlett: Director of College Project- Lucedale; Natalie Beth Seales: Vice President of Service-Hattiesburg; Virginia-Leigh Donohue: Director of Honors in Action-Vicksburg; Jenna Smith: Director of Publications and Marketing-Columbia; Annie Price: Director of Fundraising-Tupelo and Morgan Lewis, Ellisville, Southern District Representative for MS/LA Region, Laurel.

“Our chapter officers and advisors take the mission of Phi Theta Kappa, to give students a global perspective and help them achieve excellence, very seriously. We want to do our best to honor the time our members give us, from ensuring meetings are effective to communicating through Canvas, and winning some awards doesn't hurt either,” said the sophomore, PTK president, Ethan Davis. “You may join other clubs for your present enjoyment or benefit because you want something fun to do in college, but joining Phi Theta Kappa benefits your future.”

Davis, a Soso native majoring in English was also recognized individually for his efforts by receiving the Order of the Golden Key Award. He was chosen by his fellow officers for his exceptional work as PTK president and involvement in the Honors in Action project, among other projects. Davis was also selected by the college as a JCJC finalist for the Academic All-American/New Century Scholars program and was included in the JCJC Hall of Fame and “Who’s Who.”

“I could not be more honored to have been given this PTK award; I'm taking it as a sign that hard work does pay off. I have genuinely enjoyed working with the entire team this year and firmly believe that nothing would have happened without their help,” said Davis.

As a chapter, JCJC’s PTK students earned first place for its, “Honors in Action” theme, “Ideas and Ideologies.” The group worked on improving the community through several initiatives, like a voter registration drive and the Informed Citizens Endeavor campaign. Davis explained the chapter worked hard to develop a topic that had both academic merit and could cause meaningful change, not only at Jones, but everywhere. He believes they created something unique with the Informed Citizens Endeavor.

“We can say we registered hundreds of students to vote, but that was not the goal. Our mission was to show people that they have a voice and that a better world can only exist if they work for it. I honestly believe we did that for many people, even if only one person becomes politically active because of ICE, our efforts were well spent,” said Davis.

The College Project included a campus beautification component, utilizing two, student-designed sculptures to be placed on campus. That project, which included community sponsors and JCJC welding students, earned fifth place in the region. The student development newsletter for JCJC’s students was recognized with a runner-up award.

One of the four advisors of the organization, Julie Atwood also found herself in the spotlight. She received the Bennie Warren Outstanding Advisor Award at the regional conference. She was one of 15 advisors selected by a panel of judges from 48 nominees internationally.

“I was stunned but very pleased to receive the Bennie Warren Outstanding Advisor Award. I greatly enjoy working with students from year to year and it is nice to be recognized for my efforts."

The Ellisville resident has been advising the group for the last seven years. She will be honored at the annual convention in Maryland in April. The chapter may be awarded more honors at that convention, but she is already very proud of the chapter’s accomplishments and recognition bestowed this year.

“Our officer team and chapter members have worked diligently to assure that our College Project came to fruition with two student-designed sculptures being unveiled on campus as well as our Honors in Action project reminding our student body and community of the importance of civic involvement and, particularly, exercising the right to vote. In a very active and competitive region, being recognized as one of the Top 10 Distinguished Chapters is a very significant accomplishment,” said Atwood.
The chapter is positioned to earn more awards and honors at the annual international convention in April.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC offering ACT Prep Camp

Jones County Junior College
JCJC offering ACT Prep Camp

ELLISVILLE– High school students entering their sophomore year and older next fall are encouraged to participate in an opportunity for academic enhancement through Jones County Junior College’s ACT Prep Camp. The three-day camp, June 6, through 8, includes instruction from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., and is prior to the national ACT test on June 11.

The cost for the ACT Prep Camp is $150 and includes a copy of the book, “The Princeton Review” ACT prep book, test taking strategies, 15-hours of instruction in four content areas and lunch. The goal of the camp is to provide a variety of learning activities that will enhance educational goals.

The deadline to register for the ACT test is May 6, and the deadline to register for the ACT Prep Camp at JCJC is May 20. To request an ACT camp registration form, call Jamie Williams at 601-477-4030 or email her at: jamie.williams@jcjc.edu.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC - entry-level Heavy Equipment Operator

Jones County Junior College ... Advanced Technology Center Ellisville, MS
ELLISVILLE – The Jones County Junior College Workforce Development Team is offering training for jobs as an entry-level Heavy Equipment Operator. The class will meet at the JCJC Advanced Technology Center on Monday and Tuesday, nights from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. with hands-on training on Saturdays, at 6 a.m. The first class meeting will be held on Monday, May 9, 2016, at 6 p.m. at the ATC in Ellisville. Tuition is $714 for the Heavy Equipment Operator Training with possible tuition assistance available through your local WIN Job Center.

This course will include lecture, simulator training and hands-on training. Trainees will learn the basic operation of excavators and dozers from the ground up with a strong emphasis on safety. Upon successful completion of this course students will receive a certificate from Workforce Development and a National Center for Construction Education and Research transcript. Call JCJC for program information and to register at: 601-477-4114 or 601-578-0293 or contact Webb Evans by email at: webb.evans@jcjc.edu.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Wright Selected ECCC Instructor of the Year

East Central Community College in Decatur
Wright Selected ECCC Instructor of the Year
Jenna Wright of Madden was selected the 2015-16 Instructor of the Year at East Central Community College in Decatur.
When notified of her selection, Wright said, “I was overwhelmed when I found out that I received this honor. I am grateful to God first, my husband and my co-workers for the support and encouragement they give me daily.”
It is those co-workers who top the list of people who have influenced her career the most.
“My biggest influence would have to be my co-workers at EC, being that this is my first job out of graduate school. The Math and Computer Science Department took me under their wing and have taught me everything I know, not only about the art of teaching, but the importance of compassion towards students.”
Wright has been employed as a mathematics instructor at the college since 2012.
Her honors include selection as 2016 HEADWAE (Higher Education Appreciation Day: Work Toward Academic Excellence) Instructor of the Year.
When asked her about her advice to those who are considering a career in teaching, Wright said, “Teaching is a calling and will be what you make it. Learn all you can from the people around you, and laugh with your students daily.”

She earned the bachelor’s degree in math education at Troy University and completed a master’s in statistics at Mississippi State University.

Prior to joining the ECCC faculty, she was a graduate teaching assistant at Mississippi State University.




Pace Davidson Selected Mr., Miss ECCC

East Central Community College
Pace, Davidson Selected Mr., Miss ECCC

Ben Pace of Philadelphia and Skylar Davidson of Morton were selected Mr. and Miss East Central Community College for the 2015-16 school year by a vote of the student body in February.
A sophomore nursing major, Davidson is actively involved in various campus activities.
She is a member of the Warrior Corps, serving as co-president her sophomore year, and vice president of the Student Body Association. She is a member of Students Against Destructive Decisions, Diamond Darlings, and President’s Council. She also serves as a residence assistant for Barber Hall and is on the Dean’s List.
Davidson was selected as a Freshman Class Favorite, Freshman Homecoming Maid and Homecoming Queen this year.
A graduate of East Rankin Academy, she is the daughter of Joel and April Davidson of Morton.
A sophomore pre-dental major, Pace is actively involved and has received numerous honors.
He is president of Phi Theta Kappa and co-president of Warrior Corps this year. He also is a member of the Baptist Student Union, Students Against Destructive Decisions, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau, Phi Beta Lambda, Concert Choir, President’s List, and President’s Council. As a freshman, he was a member of Ac’cents and Wall O’ Sound Band.
Pace was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Community/Junior Colleges, Phi Theta Kappa All Mississippi Academic First Team, and 2015-16 HEADWAE Student of the Year.
A graduate of Neshoba Central High School, he is the son of Derek and Patty Pace of Philadelphia.




ECCC Phi Beta Lamda Students Take Top Honors

East Central Community College
ECCC PBL Students Take Top Honors

Members of East Central Community College’s Theta Chi Chapter of Phi Beta Lamda competed in 21 events during state competition and had winners in each category. Each of the 20 members participating placed first in at least one event and will attended the national competition this summer in Atlanta. Theta Chi was also recognized for largest chapter in membership, Gold Seal Recognition and Foundation Recognition. State award winners include:

Alely Cruz of Philadelphia, first place, community service, and second place, management analysis and decision making; Alisha Savell of Philadelphia, first place, business ethics, and third place, desktop publishing; and Whitney Billings of Sebastopol, first place, business ethics, and third place, desktop publishing

Jennifer Watkins of Decatur, first place, integrated marketing campaign, and second place, management analysis and decision making; Kimberly Watkins of Philadelphia, first place, small business management plan, and third place, economic analysis and decision making; Katie Hillman of Philadelphia, first place, business presentations, and third place, economic analysis and decision making; CrisAnn Bryan of Philadelphia, first place, business presentations, and first place, local chapter annual business report; and Anna Claire Housely of Morton, first place, hospitality management, and first place, parliamentary procedure

Memry Thompson of Morton, first place, computer applications, and first place, integrated marketing campaign; Paxton Holmes of Morton, first place, administrative technology, and first place, integrated marketing campaign; and Morgan Jones of Pontotoc, first place, small business management plan, and second place, public speaking

Caleb Brown of Philadelphia, first place, parliamentary procedure, and third place, economic analysis and decision making; Morgan Cain of Carthage, first place, business presentations, and first place, entrepreneurship; and Khalil Triplett of Philadelphia, first place, community service project, and second place, financial concepts

and Ben Pace of Philadelphia, first place, business ethics, and first place, parliamentary procedures; Enoc Reynoso of Carthage, first place, community service project, and first place, hospitality management; Lane Wooten of Carthage, first place, microeconomics, and fourth place, impromptu speaking; and Tyler Sistrunk of Union, first place, small business management. Not pictured are Cody Stevens of Philadelphia and Madelon Taylor of Lousiville, who both received first place honors in parliamentary procedures. Stevens also received fourth place in personal finance and Taylor received second place in business communications. Caleb Brown, CrisAnn Bryan, Kimberly Watkins and Katie Hillman were also selected for Who’s Who in PBL.




ECCC Collegians to Present Spring Campus Concert April 11

East Central Community College
ECCC Collegians to Present Spring Campus Concert April 11

East Central Community College’s rock-n-roll band, “The Collegians,” will present its annual spring campus concert at 7 p.m. Monday, April 11, in Huff Auditorium on the Decatur campus. There is no charge for admission and the public is invited to attend. The popular group will perform hits by AC/DC, Demi Lovato, Carrie Underwood, Thomas Rhett, Justin Bieber, Tori Kelley, Metallica, Nirvana, Spice Girls and many more.

Members and their respective high schools include -
Director Chas Evans, Anna Wells, Winston Academy; Aleia Sharp, Union; Tallie Johnston, a homeschooler from Lake

Chris Kelley, Newton; Peyton Jones, Nanih Waiya; Dustin Morgan, Union; and Anastasia Crout, Lake

Caleb Franklin, Morton; Garrett McDill, Sebastopol; and Houston Martin and Brad Taylor, both of Newton County

Stephen Stewart, Newton County; Anna Claire Webb, Noxapater; and Michael Buntyn and Graham Murphree, both of Newton County

Lucas Bates, Lake; Ryan Packer and Hannah Mitchell, both of Newton County; Danny Smith, Carthage; and Evan Derrick, Morton

and Troy Gregory, Newton County; Christian Richardson, Union; Sam Mitchell, Leake Academy; and Christian Bounds, Lake.




These students were recently selected class favorites following elections held on the Decatur campus

East Central Community College
These students were recently selected class favorites following elections held on the Decatur campus.
Freshmen Makenzie Byrd of Sebastopol, Jordan Phillips of Decatur, Hannah Payne of Union, Peyton Jones of Louisville, Colton Tharp of Sebastopol and Will Stewart of Decatur
Sophomores Mahalia Gibson of Hattiesburg, Anna Claire Webb of Noxapater, Hannah Mitchell of Lawrence and Brooke Payne of Union; and sophomores Kirk Griffin of Union, Devin Skinner of Philadelphia, Anthony Emmons of Lake and Evan Derrick of Morton.




ECCC’s Ryals Named MSVCC Instructor of the Year

East Central Community College
ECCC’s Ryals Named MSVCC Instructor of the Year

East Central Community College instructor Chris Ryals of Union was recently selected Mississippi Virtual Community College (MSVCC) Instructor of the Year.
Ryals teaches drafting and design technology and has been employed at the college since 2011.
Chas Evans, who teaches guitar and music classes and also serves as director of the Collegians rock and roll band, was also nominated for the award. He joined the ECCC staff in 2014.
The two finalists traveled to the Creating Futures Through Technology conference in Biloxi March 2-4, 2016. All finalists from the 15 community colleges in Mississippi were recognized at the MSVCC luncheon on March 2, and the recipient of the award was announced.
For more information contact Dr. Krista LeBrun, dean of eLearning Education at ECCC, at klebrun@eccc.edu.




ECCC to Sponsor 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk April 8

East Central Community College
ECCC to Sponsor 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk April 8

A 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk will be part of East Central Community College’s WarriorFest on Friday night, April 8, on the Decatur campus near the Pavilion and Lake area.

The 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk will begin at dark. All participants will receive medals, and prizes will be awarded to the top finishers in various divisions.

Glow-in-the-dark arm bands, necklaces, and paint will be provided, or runners may bring their own.

The registration fee for the 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk is $25 per person or $15 for students and includes a free WarriorFest admission arm band. Runners may pre-register online at www.eccc.edu/warriorfest, or enter the night of the event.

For additional information, contact David LeBlanc, director of alumni relations and the foundation at East Central Community College, at 601-635-6327 or dleblanc@eccc.edu.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




Signup for ECCC’s Battle of the Bands Underway

East Central Community College
Signup for ECCC’s Battle of the Bands Underway

A Battle of the Bands competition will be held on the East Central Community College campus Friday evening, April 8, and the college is seeking local bands interested in competing.

The Battle of the Bands will be the highlight of the college’s first WarriorFest April 8 and will begin at 6:30 p.m. Each band will perform a 12 to 15 minute set, and a $500 cash prize will be awarded to the winning band.

Following the Battle of the Bands, the featured band, 5 Finger Discount out of New Orleans, La., will perform.

The fee to enter a band in the Battle of the Bands is $50 and includes a free WarriorFest admission arm band.

Bands may sign up online at www.eccc.edu/warriorfest.

For additional information, contact David LeBlanc, director of alumni relations and the foundation at East Central Community College, at 601-635-6327 or dleblanc@eccc.edu.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




JCJC’s first Legacy Tree dedicated to alumnus & former Ellisville mayor, Dick Anderson

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s first Legacy Tree dedicated to alumnus & former Ellisville mayor, Dick Anderson
ELLISVILLE- The first “Legacy Tree” on the Jones County Junior College campus was dedicated in memory of Dick Anderson with many of his family and friends in attendance. The 1943 Jones County Agricultural High School and 1956 JCJC alumnus was the 1993 Honor Alumnus of the Year. As an active community member, he served as Mayor of Ellisville for 14 years and he was a Mississippi House of Representative for eight years. Current Ellisville Mayor, Tim Waldrup remembers Anderson and said he proudly continues his legacy of service.
“Many of the practices and procedures put into place during his tenure as mayor and the example he set, are still followed today,” said Waldrup. “Dick truly set an example that will be followed by everyone who will come behind him as mayor.”
Anderson also served two terms as the president of the Ellisville Jaycees, winning the National SPOKE Award twice. He was the General Manager of the Nehi Bottling Company in Ellisville, manager of Ellisville Custom Canners, he served on the executive committee for the National Soft Drink Association for eight years, he was a member of the Ellisville Masonic Lodge and he was a member of Ellisville’s First United Methodist Church. His service on earth ended last January, but his legacy lives on today.
“We’re very proud of Dick,” said his step-son, Grant Hedgepeth at the memorial dedication. “He never sought recognition; I think he would be embarrassed by this. But, he would also be very honored and proud inside. We want to thank JCJC and The Foundation, Buck and Tom Anderson, and everyone else that helped to do this. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.”
JCJC Foundation Executive Director, Charlie Garretson shared he grew up around Dick Anderson on hunting trips near his home. After moving to Ellisville, Garretson said he became good friends with Dick, who was as an inspiration to him. In fact, Anderson’s legacy has impacted the lives of several generations of JCJC students, faculty and staff. Hedgepeth said he is one of about five generations in his family who are grateful to Anderson for inspiring them to come to JCJC.
“He served others his entire life because he loved Ellisville, Jones County and Mississippi and he truly loved JCJC. From my grandmother Vera Graves to my mother and Dick Anderson who went to JCAHS, and JCJC, to our generation, I think all of us went to JCJC and now our children are going to school here. This is just such a wonderful campus, such a wonderful school.”
JCJC Foundation Board President, Robin Robinson added, the live oak tree and plaque is only one way to honor his legacy at JCJC and abroad.
“Mr. Anderson was one who lived his life to learn and to love and because of you, to leave a legacy. This is the first legacy tree we have and our vision is to have other trees in memory of, or in honor of great people like Mr. Anderson. So thank you (Anderson) family for this great honor and this great opportunity to leave the legacy that Mr. Anderson has created here in our area and statewide,” said Robinson.
Anderson was 90 when he died last year on January 30, 2015, after decades of leading and serving his family and his community. He was the son of Amos Deason Anderson, Sr., and Laura Louise Lawrence Anderson. For more information about Legacy Trees at JCJC, contact the Alumni and Foundation Office at 601-477-4050.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Final Plans in Place for ECCC’s First WarriorFest Family Event April 8

East Central Community College Decatur Campus
Final Plans in Place for ECCC’s First WarriorFest Family Event April 8

Excitement continues to build for East Central Community College’s first annual WarriorFest on Friday, April 8, on the ECCC campus in Decatur. The event designed for all ages will be from 6 p.m. to Midnight on the north end of campus near the ECCC Pavilion and Lake.

There is still time to register for both the 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk, sponsored by Community Bank, Inn the Oaks, and Junction Delis, as well as the Battle of the Bands, sponsored by MaxxSouth. Registration for both events, as well armbands for entrance into WarriorFest, can be purchased online at www.eccc.edu/warriorfest. Those attending also can purchase WarriorFest armbands the day of the event.

The 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk will begin at dark. All participants will receive medals, and prizes will be awarded to the top finishers in various divisions.

The highlight of WarriorFest will be the Battle of the Bands sponsored by MaxxSouth. There will be a $500 prize to the winning band. The featured band will be 5 Finger Discount out of New Orleans, La.

There will be many other activities throughout the evening, including a Hot Air Balloon Glow; a KidZone, sponsored by The Citizens Bank and Piggly Wiggly of Collinsville, with rides and inflatables throughout the evening; and a fireworks display over the lake.

There will be a Golf Ball Drop fundraiser with chances to win $1,000 and $500. Participants do not have to be present to win. Tickets can be purchased online or at the event.

A Festival Food Court will be open starting at 11 a.m. offering chicken-on-a-stick, corn dogs, funnel cakes, sausage dogs, french fries, philly steak sandwiches, and other food items.

“With the postponement of the college’s Warrior Wonderland in December so that our football team, band, cheerleaders, and fans could participate in a bowl game in Texas, WarriorFest is another opportunity for East Central to host our local communities for an evening of fun, food, and fellowship on our campus,” said ECCC President Dr. Billy Stewart. “Our Alumni Association and many other members of our college family have put together an inaugural event that will provide family fun for all ages.”

Admission to WarriorFest is $10 per person; children three and under are admitted free. ECCC students, faculty and staff will be admitted free with valid school ID.

Admission includes all activities except the registration fee for the 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk, band entry fee into the Battle of the Bands, raffle tickets for the Golf Ball Drop, and Festival Food Court items. The registration fee for the 5K Nite-Glow Run is $25 per person or $15 for students and includes a free WarriorFest admission arm band. The fee to enter a band in the Battle of the Bands is $50. Raffle tickets for the Golf Ball Drop are $10 each. All proceeds benefit the ECCC Alumni Association.

The nationally ranked East Central Lady Diamond Warrior softball team will host rival East Mississippi Community College prior to WarriorFest on April 8. Those games are scheduled for 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. at the Softball Park on the ECCC campus. There is no admission for the softball games.

For additional information, contact David LeBlanc, director of alumni relations and the foundation at East Central Community College, at 601-635-6327 or dleblanc@eccc.edu.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242




MSU PRESIDENT KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT EMCC PHI THETA KAPPA INDUCTION

East Mississippi Community College’s Scooba campus
MSU PRESIDENT KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT EMCC PHI THETA KAPPA INDUCTION

SCOOBA -- Mississippi State University President Dr. Mark Keenum was the keynote speaker during the Tuesday night induction ceremony of about 50 new Phi Theta Kappa members at East Mississippi Community College’s Scooba campus.
Keenum urged the inductees of the Eta Upsilon chapter of PTK to arm themselves with the education needed to assume leadership roles and address problems associated with a rapidly changing world.
Keenum said the 70 million members of the millennial generation in the U.S., of which the PTK inductees are members, is the largest generation in the country today and will face a changing workforce.
Keenum cited statistics by the U.S. Department of Labor that states a young person entering the workforce today can expect to work in 10 to 15 different jobs before they reach the age of 38.
“This is mind boggling to me,” Keenum said.
The U.S. Department of Labor predicts that when they begin working, 65 percent of today’s elementary school children in first through sixth grades “will be working in a job that doesn’t exist today using technologies that have yet to be invented and solving problems we don’t even know we have today,” Keenum said.
“That’s in a wink of an eye,” Keenum said. “That’s your world. That’s how fast this world is evolving and changing.”
He also spoke of the world’s growing population and the planet’s limited resources.
Keenum said by the time the inductees reach their early to mid-50s, the earth’s population will have swelled from 7 billion to 10 billion.
“Nearly one billion people, right now, don’t get enough food,” Keenum said. “Nor do they have access to adequate amounts of water.”
The challenge for the millennials will be to figure out how to help feed the world and provide water, housing and energy to an additional 3 billion people while protecting the environment and conserving natural resources.
“That is the world you are inheriting,” Keenum said. “Get yourself the best education you possibly can to equip yourself to be prepared for this changing world you are about to inherit.”
Keenum encouraged the students to assume leadership roles and attempt to make a positive impact on their world. He spoke to the inductees about the qualities of a good leader.
“The most important thing is you have to have is the value of integrity,” Keenum said. “Be a nice person. If you can truly live your life with integrity, you are going to be a great leader because people are going to trust you, have confidence in you.”
A good leader understands the value of hard work and treats all people with respect, he said.
Finally, Keenum urged the inductees to find something that helps them remain grounded. For Keenum, he leans on the bible verse found in Ephesians 4:2: “Be completely humble and gentle. Be patient; bearing with one another in love.”
“I can’t tell you how many times I stop in a day and recite that in my head because it helps me stay calm,” Keenum said.
Following the ceremony, the inductees participated in a signing ceremony and received their certificates.
At the induction ceremony, Anna Dudley, a student officer with the Eta Upsilon chapter of PTK, had a surprise announcement for EMCC President Dr. Thomas Huebner, Jr., and Dr. Thomas Ware, EMCC vice president for instruction.
“To thank you for all that you do and for making this chapter so successful, we have contacted Phi Theta Kappa headquarters and have officially inducted both of you into the Eta Upsilon chapter as honorary members,” Dudley told the two men, who were given a PTK pin and certificate.
Huebner presented PTK advisor Janet Briggs a pin for 15 years of service to the organization.
“I want to share this with you in front of this group and tell you thank you. Because I can’t even imagine the effect you’ve had on the students through the years,” Huebner said.
Dudley had this to say about her PTK advisors: “I just want to say a personal thank you from me and from this year’s chapter officers who join me on stage to our chapter advisors, Janet Briggs and Derrick Conner, two amazing people and we thank you so much for everything you do. You are greatly appreciated and we will forever remember our time here because of the two of you.”
Ware offered the closing remarks in which he congratulated the inductees.
“You have achieved a lot in your time at EMCC,” Ware said. “Being a member of PTK is no small honor because it will open many doors for you.”
The induction ceremony for the 50-plus new Phi Theta Kappa members at EMCC’s Golden Triangle campus took place March 23.




ECCC To Offer CNA Courses in Philadelphia, Decatur

Integrated Technologies Training Center in Philadelphia and ... Workforce Development Center in Decatur
ECCC To Offer CNA Courses in Philadelphia, Decatur
East Central Community College will offer a six-week Certified Nurse Aide course in Philadelphia and Decatur beginning Monday, April 4, 2016.
Classes will meet at the Integrated Technologies Training Center in Philadelphia and at the Workforce Development Center in Decatur.
Classes will be held from 3:30 to 7:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday nights for six consecutive weeks.
Cost to attend is $776 per person, which includes all materials except the TB Skin Test. Wendy Cumberland and Niva Alexander will serve as instructors at the Philadelphia Center. Theresa Cole and Christy Wilson will instruct the course in Decatur.
Registration is open through Thursday, March 31, 2016.
For more information, contact Teri Killens, ITTC administrative assistant, at 601-389-0832, or Debra Hutchins, ECCC workforce development coordinator, at 601-635-6295. The email is tkillens@eccc.edu or dhutchins@eccc.edu.




ECCC To Offer Pharmacy Tech Classes in Carthage

Carthage Career Advancement Center
ECCC To Offer Pharmacy Tech Classes in Carthage
The East Central Community College Workforce Development Center will offer a Pharmacy Technician course beginning Monday, April 4, 2016, at the Carthage Career Advancement Center.
Classes will meet from 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for 18 consecutive Mondays. The cost is $275 per student and the textbook is included in the course fee. The national certification exam is an additional $129 and payable to the National Pharmacy Certification Testing Board at the time of the exam.
Registration continues through Friday, April 1, 2016.
For more information or to register, contact Matthew Riley, Carthage site coordinator and personal development specialist, at 601-298-0723. The email is mriley@eccc.edu.




Town Hall Meeting for the Superintendent Search

Meridian High School Auditorium
The scheduled Town Hall Meeting for the Superintendent Search is quickly approaching! The Town Hall Meeting for parents and community members is scheduled for Tuesday, April 5 at 6:00 p.m. in the MHS Auditorium.

The Superintendent search firm, the Mississippi School Boards Association, will be present at the Town Hall meeting to hear from community members about what they would like to see in the next Superintendent of the Meridian Public School District. This is the second and final opportunity for the community to be heard and have input in the process prior to the selection of the next Superintendent. *The first opportunity that was given was the feedback surveys.

Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




MPSD will be closed on Friday, March 25 and Monday, March 28

Meridian Public Schools
Good Morning!
MPSD will be closed on Friday, March 25 and Monday, March 28 for Easter Break. Classes resume on Tuesday, March 29.

Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




JCJC art students get a glimpse into the dark with artwork from Mary Hardy

Jones County Junior College Eula Bass Lewis Art Gallery
JCJC art students get a glimpse into the dark with artwork from Mary Hardy

ELLISVILLE – A display of mixed media art pieces filled with a mix of memories, sometimes complimented with “found” items dominates the art of Mary Hardy whose work is on display at Jones County Junior College’s Eula Bass Lewis art gallery through March. The Ocean Springs resident and retired Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College art teacher encouraged JCJC art students to follow their instincts during an afternoon session with the artist.

“What you have to say is important. If you are trying to please the public or your teacher you are not going to be honest. My art is intuitive; it is not planned it is my story,” said Hardy who further explained how she personalizes her work. “I am intrigued by the ambiguity of memory. The various images I use or recycle seem to resonate with me in that way. I do not always know why and I have learned not to question, just to trust the visceral need to use these fleeting memories.”

The students pointed out the use of dark colors in a lot of her work with Hardy confessing, “I have a visual problem. I like dark colors and I love contrast.”

She also admitted to being influenced by the quilts she grew up with in her grandmother’s Tennessee home. The featured artist shared a lot of her paintings are a reflection of her childhood memories.

“They reflect how I feel about life and I how I move through life,” said Hardy. “The formal qualities of my art training, the balance of color and the strong design, hold it all together. The ultimate goal is to draw you in. I want to create an atmosphere with depth that draws you closer.”

However Hardy explained she leaves enough ambiguity so the viewer can participate and be included in the story. JCJC student from Silver Creek, Dana Baker said she is an example of someone who is captivated by her paintings.

“Sometimes I don’t know why I enjoy it but I do. The paintings just seem to resonate with me but I can’t verbally tell you why,” said Baker.

Laurel’s Megan Livingston, a sophomore JCJC art student said the trees drew her into Hardy’s painting, “Underlying.”

“I like trees and they are not obvious in the picture. You have to really look at it to get the full gist of it. There are yellows and dark colors contrasting….I love the painting!”

Joanna Espy of Monticello also found herself entranced by the painting, “Looming.” The graphic artist said, “I think of the remnants of the burned house and wonder about the memories of a different place and time. There’s something soft, gentle and sad, yet inviting about it.”

The assemblage, “Collection Box” also seemed to intrigue students. This layered organza printed material organized like a quilt over a wooden structure, reveals items from the artist’s past, hidden and organized in a collection of square boxes, like a quilt.

“I keep a box of found items and I go through it from time to time. I find an item that triggers ideas and memories to use to create something, making each piece of artwork unique,” said Hardy. “Building up multiple layers of surfaces, some transparent, to create an atmospheric depth while other areas have a textured, heavy rawness, all are reflective of how memories can float up, rapidly recede and/or surface again, harsh, sharp, unexpected and often transformed.”

Hardy’s education includes a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree from the University of South Alabama both in Art Education and a very long list of workshops taken throughout the U.S. and Mexico. From 2010 to 2013, in addition to continuing her diligent studio schedule, Hardy served as Curator for the Duckett Gallery in the Mary C. O’Keefe Cultural Center for Arts and Education in Ocean Springs, MS. She has received numerous awards for her artwork and for her teaching. Her work has been exhibited in six solo museum and gallery shows in the past ten years. She has been included in several prestigious invitational shows and in numerous group shows. Her work has been recognized with grants, fellowships and numerous awards and is included in many noted public and private collections. Hardy’s work is represented by Carol Robinson Gallery in New Orleans, Louisiana and Fischer Galleries, Jackson, Mississippi. Her work and additional information may be found on her website www.maryhardystudio.com

Hardy’s artwork will be on display through the end of the month at JCJC’s art gallery. For more information about the JCJC art show contact the gallery at 601-477-4148 or visit the gallery which is open Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., and Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The gallery is closed for lunch daily from 11:30 until noon.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




MCC - You Be The Chemist competition.

Meridian Community College
Meridian Community College hosted the first local / state competition of the You Be The Chemist competition.
Champion: Abby Carraway, Calvary Christian School
1st Runner Up: Madison Norris, Lamar School
2nd Runner Up: Lake Morgan, Lamar School
3rd Runner Up: Anthony Bennett, Magnolia Middle School

More than 25 participants from across Calvary, Lamar, Magnolia, and Poplar Springs


Kay Thomas
Director of College Promotions
Meridian Community College
910 Highway 19 North
Meridian, MS 39307
601-484-8689
kthomas@meridiancc.edu



JCJC faculty and staff accomplishments honored

Jones County Junior College
JCJC faculty and staff accomplishments honored
ELLISVILLE - Sixteen Jones County Junior College faculty and staff members were recently honored for their accomplishments in the workplace over the previous year. The Appreciation Awards began in 2004 and focus on four individuals from four categories of employees: faculty, office staff and administrative support, and employees working in, maintenance, housekeeping, campus grounds and campus police. Each staff employee finalist was awarded a cash prize of $125 and the overall winner received $625. Faculty finalists each received a cash prize of $250 and the overall winner received $1,000. Three individual honors were also bestowed upon selected employees, including the Leadership Award for Administrative Excellence, SODEXHO Employee Award of Excellence and the Barbara and Gary Sauls Award for Excellence in Teaching Humanities.
The Faculty Recognition Program was designed and funded by the JCJC Foundation, Inc., and the college, with the luncheon sponsored by the JCJC Student Government Association, the college and the JCJC Foundation. Finalists are selected and interviewed by the Faculty and Staff Recognition Program Selection Committee. The finalists for the faculty awards were Dr. Judy Baker, Associate Degree Nursing; Dianne Johnson, Business & Office Technology; Nikki Johnson, Fine Arts; Ginger Keeton, Marketing Management Technology and Terri Stringer, Health & Human Services.
Laurel’s Nikki Johnson was chosen for the overall award. Johnson has been teaching at JCJC for nine years and spent two years on the coast teaching high school students. The 1998 JCJC alumna teaches voice for music majors, voice for non-music majors, music appreciation and musical theater workshop. She explained, as a finalist, composing a few essays and completing an interview with a panel has renewed her passion for her life's work.
“I landed my dream job nine years after graduating from JCJC and have worked tirelessly to continue to raise the bar for our Fine Arts Department, both academically and vocally, but specifically in Musical Theatre,” said Johnson. “During this award process I was forced to take a look at how my life impacts my students, this institution, and my community. I found so much I need to improve but I also had a moment to celebrate the successes.”
Despite spending numerous hours working on the annual musical theater production, Johnson volunteers her time sharing her talents. The Petal native has performed on various stages throughout the Pine Belt including the Laurel Little Theater, Hattiesburg Civic Light Opera, and USM. Johnson also assists local high school show choirs as a vocal coach, she critiques competition shows and performs at area churches. The current Jones County resident helps her community by offering free voice lesson videos, free workshops and webinars about biblical history and the usage of essential oils.
“I was so humbled, not to mention completely shocked, to receive the Faculty Recognition Award from the JCJC Foundation. These nine years of service have afforded me the opportunity to see just how much time and effort is required to nurture and grow our beloved institution. I pray that my service has assisted in the continued advancement and livelihood of Jones Junior College so that it may change the lives of students for centuries to come. True greatness requires much work after class is dismissed,” said Johnson.
Another member of the JCJC faculty being recognized was Dr. Judy Baker who has taught for nearly 14 years in the Associate Degree Nursing program. She serves the college as an advisor and she is the founder of the new student group, Fellowship of Christian Nurses. The Petal resident is involved in missions through her church and she sponsors a child in Nicaragua through Compassion International. Baker is a volunteer for Comfort Care Home Health and Hospice, Hope House, and Mississippi Marrow Donor program.
Dianne Johnson has been teaching for a total of 27 years with 19 years teaching business and office technology courses at JCJC. The Jones County resident teaches mostly female students who are divorced or widowed with a family to support and need the skills to be employable. Johnson said she is rewarded when those students achieve success in learning, become more confident, and gain the skills to make their lives better.
“I was so honored to be nominated and given the opportunity to be involved in the award process. It meant a lot to me!” said Johnson, who taught four consecutive night classes to ensure her students could obtain medical terminology and insurance coding skills.
Johnson also found time to volunteer her time to be the committee chair for the BOT Advisory board, a member of the Jones County Parent Advisory Committee and an FBLA District competition event administrator. She also serves as a board member for Mountain View Haven which is a ministry that provides counseling to pastors, church staff and youth in need of therapy. Her husband Paul and she also spearheaded a community effort to provide supplies and food for the victims of Hurricane Ike in Texas. She has served in many capacities at church from volunteer choir director to FifthQuarter meetings, DNOW weekends, youth trips and summer camps.
For nearly nine years, Ginger Keeton has been teaching marketing management technology classes at Jones. The JCJC 1994 alumna also has eight additional years teaching marketing and human resource classes in an area high school. The current Petal resident devotes her time judging academic contests, serving on various committees at JCJC and assisting with the implementation of DECA and FBLA competitions. The Covington County native said she really enjoys the long term relationships she builds with her students.

“I thank God for giving me the opportunity to teach marketing at this special place, and I am deeply honored to be a finalist as each day that I spend with my students and my JCJC family encourages and inspires me. The relationships that I have developed here are precious to me, and I am so blessed,” said Keeton.

The last faculty finalist, Terri Stringer of Jones County has been teaching at JCJC for eight years with 11 years total in the teaching profession. As the Health Care Assistants instructor, she volunteers in numerous health related activities on and off campus, including Stop the Hunger, Christian Food Missions, Blood Drives, Special Olympics and ARC Summer camps.
Humanities instructor, John Burks of Hattiesburg was selected to receive the Barbara & Gary Sauls Award for Excellence in Teaching Humanities. Burks has been teaching at JCJC for nine years. He received a $500 cash award in recognition of his abilities as a Humanities instructor who exemplifies intellectual integrity in the classroom, encourages independent analytical thinking skills, engenders a love for humanitarian pursuits and fosters a positive rapport with students. This Humanities award was initiated by JCJC alumni, Mr. & Mrs. Gary W. “Buddy” and Barbara Sauls. Their daughter, Tracy was a 1990 JCJC graduate. Mr. Sauls was a former JCJC Board of Trustees member and Mrs. Saul is currently on the JCJC Foundation board.
The Leadership Award for Administrative Excellence was established three years ago to honor a mid-level administrator whose commitment to the profession has stood out amongst their peers. Library Director, Title IX Coordinator and Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society sponsor, Julie Atwood was chosen as the recipient of this honor. The former Oak Grove resident now lives in Jones County and started working at JCJC 11 years ago. She worked in Financial Aid and was promoted to Acquisitions Librarian in 2006. Atwood has since taken on more responsibilities, becoming the Library Director in 2012 and the Title IX Coordinator in 2015. She has served as PTK advisor for the last seven years.
“I am both honored and humbled to receive this award. I have greatly appreciated the opportunity to serve in various capacities at Jones County Junior College and I look forward to many more years here,” said Atwood.
A relatively new award, SODEXHO Employee Award of Excellence for 2015 for members of the cafeteria staff was bestowed upon Robert Blakely who is one of the original crew hired, almost 36 years ago. Pat Williams, SODEXHO office manager said of the Jones County native, “Rob is one of the most dependable people here and he can do anything in this kitchen. He is a real sweetheart too.”
Blakely received a plaque and a cash award for his service.
The Office Staff and Administrative Support nominees included Jones County residents, Sonya Davis Dykes in Student Affairs, Paula Harrison in Fine Arts, Joanna Newcomb in the Alumni and Foundation Office, and Latasha Peters in Financial Aid. Each staff member received $125. However, Peters, who was promoted to Student Accounts recently after working in Financial Aid for 12 years, was named the Employee of the Year. Five-hundred dollars was added to her award for receiving the honor.
“Receiving this award unexpectedly is a blessing. To be chosen out of hundreds of my fellow co-workers speaks volumes,” said Peters. “I really enjoy my job because it gives me the opportunity to assist students as they work towards their education goals.”
In the maintenance, housekeeping, campus grounds and campus police departments, campus police officer, David Coleman of Jones County was recognized for his six years patrolling campus. Jones County’s Mary Ann Evans’ 12 years in housekeeping earned her a spot as a finalist. Vicki Robinson was also commended for her five years in housekeeping. The top award went to Ashley Adams who has worked in grounds keeping for three years.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu



JCJC’s music department hosts Spring Recital Series

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s music department hosts Spring Recital Series
ELLISVILLE –A feast of music from across the ages and around the world is being offered on Friday’s in April at Jones County Junior College. The annual Spring Recital Series features a variety of musicians and vocalists entertaining the audience during the lunch hour. This musical event begins on Friday, April 1, at 12:30 p.m. until 12:55 p.m. in the Foote Chapel and will continue on each Friday through April. All concerts are free and open to the public. For more information call the JCJC Fine Arts Department at 601-477-4094 or look online at: http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/finearts.

Friday, April 1, at 12:30 p.m. in JCJC’s Foote Chapel the Series begins with “Peace, Love, and Joy!” presented by soprano Susan Ruggiero and pianist Elizabeth Moak. This recital will feature a program of art songs by Schumann, Schubert, Reynaldo Hahn, Rossini and Ricky Ian Gordon.

“European Music of the Early 20th Century” will be the theme of the Friday, April 8, recital at 12:30 p.m. in the Foote Chapel. Saxophonist Adam Estes and pianist Stacy Rodgers will demonstrate the diversity of the saxophone and piano duo. This program will feature lyrical qualities of each instrument in character pieces and spirited dance forms.

If you attend the Friday, April 15, recital at 12:30 p.m. in the Foote Chapel, the harpsichord will be the featured instrument for a program entitled, “Harpsichord Classics from the Early 18th Century.” Harpsichordist John Paul recreates the age of the harpsichord virtuosi with music by the master composer/performers.

The Isosceles Trio will share entertaining and innovative music scored for this unusual ensemble at the final recital on, Friday, April 22, at 12:30 p.m. in the Foote Chapel. This group features Jacquelyn Adams on horn, Richard Perry on tuba and Lois Leventhal on piano.
MORE ABOUT MUSICIANS:
April 1, 2016 performers
Soprano Susan Ruggiero is an active performer and educator based in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. She is the recipient of several prestigious opera awards including: Shreveport Opera’s Singer of the Year Competition, Mozart Award in the National Orpheus Vocal Competition, and district winner in the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions (2007 and 2009). She has performed roles with New Orleans Opera, Natchez Opera, Mississippi Opera, Kentucky Opera, Opera South, Wildwood Opera, Blue Lake Opera, and Opéra Louisiane. In addition to her performing activities, Ruggiero teaches voice and theory at the University of Southern Mississippi, flute and voice at William Carey University, and she is a performing faculty member at both the Festival Música nas Montanhas in Poços de Caldas, Brazil, and Blue Lake Fine Arts Camp in Michigan. Ruggiero holds a double master’s degree in voice and flute performance from the University of Michigan, and a DMA from Louisiana State University.

Noted for her “sensitivity” and “generous imagination” (La Suisse), pianist Elizabeth Moak has performed throughout the United States and internationally. Winner of the Mu Phi Epsilon International Competition, Elizabeth Moak holds the Diplôme de Virtuosité from the Neuchâtel Conservatory (Switzerland). In addition to honors for her solo playing, Moak has also been recognized for her collaborative work by the Peabody Conservatory and the Music Academy of the West. Moak is currently on the faculty of Southern Miss and previously was selected for a Teaching Fellow at Peabody Conservatory, as well as for the “Outstanding Young Faculty” Award from Millsaps College. Her recording Art Fire Soul: Piano Music of Judith Lang Zaimont induced critics to note Moak’s “brio, assurance, and remarkable talent” (ResMusica, France) as well as her “musicianship and panache” (Classical Net). Recent concerts, both solo and collaborative, have taken Moak to Taiwan and China.

April 8, 2016 performers
Adam Estes is assistant professor of music at the University of Mississippi, where he teaches saxophone and bassoon, coaches woodwind chamber ensembles, and teaches woodwinds methods courses. Most recently, he was assistant professor at Minot State University. Formerly a band director in the public schools in Mason, Texas, Estes has also held posts as visiting professor of saxophone at Furman University and the University of South Carolina, as well as instructorships at Presbyterian College and the South Carolina Governors School for the Arts and Humanities.

Estes has been the principal bassoonist with the Western Plains Opera Company and the Minot Symphony Orchestra, and has been a regular substitute bassoonist and saxophonist with the Memphis Symphony Orchestra, North Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, South Carolina Philharmonic, Charleston Symphony Orchestra, and Augusta Symphony Orchestra. He is a founding member of the Assembly Quartet. He maintains an active performance schedule as a soloist, chamber musician, and orchestral musician. His performing career has taken him to venues in Scotland, Ireland, Austria, Switzerland, France, and Belgium.

He holds graduate degrees from the University of South Carolina and a Bachelor’s degree in Music Education from Tarleton State University. His primary teachers have been Clifford Leaman, Greg Ball, Peter Kolkay, Carol Lowe, and Douglas Graham. Dr. Estes is a Yamaha Performing Artist and performs exclusively on Yamaha Saxophones.

Stacy Rodgers is professor of music at the University of Mississippi where he is head of keyboard studies and collaborative piano. He earned a bachelor’s degree in piano performance from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, and a master’s degree in piano pedagogy and literature at the University of Texas in Austin. Mr. Rodgers teaches piano performance, piano literature, private lesson and group piano pedagogy, accompanying, chamber music, and an occasional theory or history course. He performs frequently with his wife Diane Wang as a piano duo and four-hand team and with faculty colleagues from all performance areas. At the national level, Mr. Rodgers has performed with soprano Kallen Esperian, members of the New York Philharmonic, the University of Michigan wind faculty, violinist Scott St. John, and Rolf Smedvig, founder and lead trumpet of the Empire Brass Quintet, and many others. In a typical year, he performs more than twenty different full-length programs. His chamber repertoire alone includes almost five hundred works, from pieces for solo instrument and piano, to works for multiple pianos with or without orchestra, piano trios, quartets, quintets, and mixed ensembles.

April 15, 2016 performers
John Paul grew up in the coastal town of Lyme Regis, Dorsetshire, England. In 1961 he won entrance to the Royal Academy of Music in London where his principle teachers were Alan Richardson, C. H. Trevor, Eric H. Thiman, and Thurston Dart. Paul holds the Academy’s diplomas in Piano and Organ, an honors degree from the University of London, and a doctorate from the University of Colorado.

In 1965 he immigrated to Jackson, Mississippi to become the Organist and Choirmaster at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral and has served as organist at Temple Beth Israel since 1973. At St. Andrew’s he has been responsible for all service music and the Wednesday at St. Andrew’s noontime concert series begun in 1971, which quickly became a model for series throughout the country.

Paul has a special interest in the plucked keyboard instruments and has toured as a harpsichordist since 1980, presenting concerts and workshops in the United States, South America and Europe. Since 1997 he has been in partnership with harpsichordist Shawn Leopard in many performances from Boston to Miami. This duo has recorded the Bach Trio Sonatas with Lyrichord Discs and the Soler Conciertos for Two Keyboards on the Centaur label. In 2002, Centaur released Paul’s solo recording of the complete clavichord pieces of Herbert Howells. In 2005, Lyrichord Discs released a three-disc set of the complete harpsichord works of the Baroque French master Jacques Du Phly. The same label is in the process of releasing a seven-disc series of all 19 of J.S. Bach’s Clavier Suites. In recent months the Centaur label has just released a four-disc set of the complete Well-Tempered Clavier, also by J.S. Bach.

In 2002 Paul was awarded the prestigious Governor’s Award for Excellent in the Arts by the Mississippi Arts Commission.

April 22, 2016 performers
The Isosceles Trio was created by music faculty at the University of Southern Mississippi to share entertaining and innovative music scored for tuba, horn, and piano.

Jacquelyn Adams is principal horn of the Pensacola Symphony and Meridian Symphony. She performed at The Sixth International Horn Day in Canada, The Cusco Music Festival, and with The Mobile Symphony Youth Orchestra. Recordings include Genghis Barbie’s self-titled debut album, David Byrne and St. Vincent’s Love This Giant, Astor Piazzolla’s Oblivion, and Aaron Copland’s Clarinet Concerto; she also records for NFL Films. Television and movie appearances include CBS’s The Early Show, Disney’s Step Up 3D, and BET’s Music Awards 2007. Adams is Assistant Professor of Horn at The University of Southern Mississippi and holds degrees from The Curtis Institute of Music, Yale University, and University of New York at Stony Brook.

Dr. Lois Leventhal, pianist, received her doctorate of music at Indiana University and is currently a professor of music at The University of Southern Mississippi. Her performing career includes concert appearances throughout Mississippi, as well as solo and chamber recitals in Chicago, New York, London and, under the auspices of the United States Information Agency, Argentina and Uruguay. Dr. Leventhal, whose performances have been broadcast widely, can also be heard on compact disc on Crystal and Albany labels with colleague Dr. Lawrence Gwozdz, saxophonist.

Richard H. Perry holds degrees from Tennessee Technological University, the University of Illinois and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been active as a clinician, performer, and adjudicator throughout the Eastern United States. A former member of the acclaimed Tennessee Tech Tuba Ensemble, Dr. Perry is currently a member of the Southern Arts Brass Quintet, the Modern Jazz Tuba Project, and the Meridian and Gulf Coast Symphony Orchestras.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC’s Pharmacy Technology program is accepting applications

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s Pharmacy Technology program is accepting applications

ELLISVILLE-- Jones County Junior College’s Pharmacy Technology Program is now accepting applications for the fall 2016 semester, with May 1, 2016 as a priority deadline. Applications can be downloaded from the website at http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/pharmacy_howtoenroll.php or by calling the department at 601-477-4230.

The JCJC Pharmacy Technology curriculum is a two year program which combines classroom instruction, laboratory work, and clinical experience to prepare students for employment and advancement in the pharmacy field. Admission requirements for the program include a high school diploma or GED, a minimum score of 17 on the ACT, and a background check. The student will obtain an Associate of Applied Science degree after successfully completing the program and will be eligible to take the National Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam.

The Mississippi Board of Pharmacy has now required technicians who register with the board, to pass the technician certification exam within one year or before March 31st. The focus of the JCJC program is for students to earn an associate degree in Pharmacy Technology and to prepare for the National Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam. JCJC has maintained a successful passing rate for the exam.

The Pharmacy Technology program at Jones is designed to train a technician to work in each type of pharmacy setting and to proficiently perform each task. The US Department of Labor has forecasted pharmacy technician job growth of over 31% by 2018. Currently, there are an estimated 381,000 full and part-time pharmacy technicians in the United States.

Students will learn pharmacology, pharmaceutical compounding, dosage calculations, pharmacy management, pharmacy law, therapeutic classification of drugs, drug use and abuse, trade and generic nomenclature, medical transcription abbreviations, and health care devices utilization. Through classroom and laboratory instruction, students will learn methods of drug preparation, packaging and distribution, and the function and services provided by retail and hospital pharmacies. The technician will be prepared to transcribe physician orders, prepare, dispense, and deliver orders, prepare admixtures of intravenous solutions, maintain inventory control, replenish pharmaceutical supplies, maintain patient records, and communicate effectively with patients, other health care providers, and third party insurance agencies. Practical experience in community clinical and retail settings will enhance the learning experience.

Graduates of this program will have the skills necessary for employment as technicians under the direct supervision of a registered pharmacist. They will be qualified to assist and support pharmacists in providing health care and medications to patients in retail settings, hospitals, home health care, nursing homes clinics, nuclear medicine settings, and compounding pharmacies. Non-traditional employers will also include medical insurance companies, drug wholesale companies, medical computer software vendors, and drug manufactures.

For more information call 601-477-4021 or 601-477-4230, or email Tracey McCraw at: tracey.mccraw@jcjc.edu or stephanie.jones@jcjc.edu or visit the website at: http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/index.php. Program applications can be found at: http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/docs/application.pdf.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC engineering students earn scholarships from MS Professional Engineering Society

Jones County Junior College
JCJC engineering students earn scholarships from MS Professional Engineering Society

ELLISVILLE – National Engineering Week was celebrated at Jones County Junior College with three JCJC students receiving scholarships from the Southeast Area Chapter of the Mississippi Professional Engineering Society. Three JCJC engineering students, Anna Kay Hinton of Petal, Sierra Holmes of Purvis and Clayton Mikell of Petal each received scholarships from the Pine Belt’s professional engineers.


“These students have demonstrated a financial need, are academically successful, were recommended by their peers and mentors, and are involved in their community and college,” said MPES Southeast Area Chapter Scholarship Chair, Larry Joe Daughtry.

The JCJC students receiving scholarships are members of the college’s Engineering Club and have GPA’s ranging from 3.5 to 4.0. The JCJC club’s sponsor and physics instructor, Mary Boleware said the partnership with the MPES plays an important role in better preparing our engineering majors.

“Our local professional engineers inform students of opportunities in STEM fields, specifically the academic engineering degree programs in Mississippi. It is so important for students to know what our state has to offer in the hope our students will stay in Mississippi to improve products, systems, and processes that affect all of us every day. The MES has a huge impact on our engineering students at JCJC by providing scholarships, providing speakers and industry tours for our Student Engineering Society members every year,” said Boleware.

The annual meeting with MPES includes about 100 college and high school students to learn about job opportunities and get academic advice to help them to be successful in their pursuit of an engineering career. JCJC’s engineering club co-hosted the event at the college which includes presentations from three of Mississippi’s engineering colleges.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC employees honored for service

Jones County Junior College
JCJC employees honored for service

ELLISVILLE – Sixty-three Jones County Junior College faculty and staff members were recently honored for their years of service to the college. Administrators and the JCJC Foundation treated everyone to a BBQ lunch and recognized employees at five year increments, beginning with those who have served at least five years.

There were four employees who celebrated 30 years with JCJC: Helena Gunnell, LPN instructor; Milton Newell Sr., maintenance; Joey Davis, social science instructor and Gary Herring, librarian.

Five JCJC employees were recognized for their 25 years of service: Estella Chapman, housekeeping; Mike Cole, Director of External Funding and SACS Liason; Daniel Wooten, maintenance; Caren Griffin, social science instructor and Regina Clark, Office of Instructional Affairs.

Celebrating 20 years of employment at JCJC were: Mary Abbey, Office of Instructional Affairs; Theresa Sanchez, music instructor; Angela Parker, housekeeping; Henry Harvey, maintenance/painter and Erin Knight Associate Degree Nursing Division Chair.

Seventeen JCJC employees were recognized for their 15 years of service including: Carson Atwood, social science instructor; Ashley Hill, campus housing and enrollment auditor; Winnie Walters, ABE; Paul Spell, Information Technology Director; Tara Dupree, admissions; Amy Hinton, paralegal instructor; Mary Boleware, physics instructor; Phyllis Shearer, data analyst; Kelly Robinson, ATC-Workforce Development; Wesley Dixon, Jr., nigh librarian; Candace Weaver, VP of Instructional Affairs and Institutional Effectiveness; Diasetta Nelson, housekeeping; Merry Beth Tigert, ABE instructor; Michael Tisdale, maintenance; Sonya Graves, payroll coordinator; Dana Knight foreign languages adjunct instructor and Jacquelyn Canizaro, social sciences instructor.

JCJC employees celebrating 10 years of service include: Lucy Flowers, Career and Technical support services; Lori Tally, LPN Director; Sara Buchanan, Office of Business Affairs; Kristen Register, health services; Austin Smith, science instructor; Debbie Buckley, housekeeping; Mary Kuhn, financial aid counselor; Renee' Russell, housekeeping; Kay Guiles, music instructor; Diane Love, bookstore; Rosa Conner, housekeeping; Mark Brown, art instructor; Deborah Dearman, ABE instructor; Kayla Hankins, advisement and cheer coach and Jennifer Hinton, business affairs.

For five years, sixteen employees were honored for their service including: Lauren Wade, One Card Services; Anthony Maddox, Assistant Football Coach; Michael Yarbrough, ABE instructor; Stanley Livingston, Campus Police Chief; Jamie Williams, student affairs; Scott Sumrall, grounds keeper; Karen Kirk, drafting and design instructor; Mitch Dubose , IT Division Chair; Kandace Martin, eLearning Coordinator; David Coleman, campus police; Victoria Johnson, music instructor; Eric Sumrall, grounds keeper; Susan Rayner, ADN nursing; Ellis Doggett, campus police; Lisa Rittenhouse, recruiting and Micah Moore, culinary instructor.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC is offering “Kids’ College” summer camp

Jones County Junior College
JCJC is offering “Kids’ College” summer camp

ELLISVILLE – First through six graders will have the opportunity to check out college this summer as a part of Jones County Junior College’s Kids’ College summer camp. Campers will gather Monday, June 6, through Friday, June 10, from 8:30 a.m. until 11:30 a.m. The $95 tuition includes all supplies and snacks and is non-refundable.

Kids’ College courses include Phenomenal Physics, Kids’ Southern Cuisine, Zoology: Animals Up Close and Personal, Science Snacks, Australian Art, and Physical Education.

For more information call program director, Missie Meeks at 601-477-5427 or email missie.meeks@jcjc.edu or check out the web page at www.jcjc.edu/camps.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC hosts MCTM Jr. H.S. Math Contest

Jones County Junior College
JCJC hosts MCTM Jr. H.S. Math Contest
ELLISVILLE - Jones County Junior College’s Math department along with the Mississippi Council of Teachers of Mathematics recently sponsored the district level MCTM Math Contest for Jr. High School students. About 40 students from ten Pine Belt schools spent the morning working out various math problems to earn a spot at the state competition in April.

Taylorsville’s Hunter McCrory took first place amongst seventh graders, with Raleigh’s Anna Beth Blackwell earning second place honors. Eighth grader Bradley Snyder from Leakesville won first place and Stringer’s Trevor Alpin won second place amongst all of the eighth graders competing. These students will continue competition on the state level on April 9.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC’s Kiana McFadden named Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Silver Scholar

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s Kiana McFadden named Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Silver Scholar
ELLISVILLE – Jones County Junior College sophomore from Waynesboro, Kiana McFadden was one of fifty students to be named a 2016 Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Silver Scholar. The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation sponsors the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team program by recognizing 50 Gold, 50 Silver and 50 Bronze Scholars, and providing nearly $200,000 in scholarships annually. Each Silver Scholar receives a $1,250 scholarship and a special medallion.
“It is astounding to me that I was one of the fifty selected and I feel very honored that the Coca-Cola organization has chosen me as one of the recipients for this award,” said the physics and environmental law major. “More than 1,900 people submitted an application and only fifty were selected as a 2016 Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Silver Scholar.”
Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society administers the Coca-Cola Community College Academic Team Program and recognizes Coca-Cola Community College scholars during the All-State Community College Academic Team Recognition ceremonies held in 38 states. McFadden was one of two finalists chosen from JCJC students in the fall recommended for numerous PTK scholarships as an Academic All-State nominee. The PTK member and PTK VP of Leadership manages a busy schedule at JCJC. She is a member of the Charles Pickering Honors Institute, a member of the marching band and saxophone quartet, along with volunteering as a Sunday school teacher, choir member, chemistry tutor, and helping at numerous events like the campus Voter Registration Drive and the Student Council Workshop at JCJC. Her goal is to become an environmental lawyer for government agencies like NOAA or NASA. Being selected as a Coca-Cola Academic Team Silver Scholar is a major financial blessing.
“Upon entering college, I had a goal: to not have my parents pay for college. I wanted to be the best student I could be in order to earn scholarships. Being a Coca-Cola Silver Scholar recipient means that this scholarship is an amount that they do not have to pay towards my education,” said McFadden.
Mississippi’s student scholars will be recognized at the Capitol March 22, 2016 and at Phi Theta Kappa’s Annual Convention in April.
“We thank the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation for their vote of confidence in community college students by investing in their futures,” said Dr. Lynn Tincher-Ladner, President and CEO of Phi Theta Kappa. “Their support is especially welcome during this challenging economic climate, as more and more community college students need additional resources to help them complete their degrees.”
Community college presidents or their designated nominators may submit no more than two nominations per campus for this award. An independent panel of judges considers outstanding academic rigor, grade point average, academic and leadership awards, and engagement in college and community service in the selection process.
“The Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation has a long history of providing financial assistance to outstanding students at community colleges,” said J. Mark Davis, President of the Coca-Cola Scholars Foundation. “We are proud to partner with Phi Theta Kappa and make it possible for deserving students to achieve their educational goals.”
Phi Theta Kappa, headquartered in Jackson, Mississippi, is the largest honor society in higher education with 1,285 chapters on college campuses in all 50 of the United States, U.S. territorial possessions and eight sovereign nations. More than 3 million students have been inducted since its founding in 1918, with approximately 134,000 students inducted annually.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




ECCC’s Inaugural WarriorFest Family-Fun Event Scheduled for April 8th

East Central Community College ECCC campus in Decatur
ECCC’s Inaugural WarriorFest Family-Fun Event Scheduled for April 8

A Hot Air Balloon Glow, 5K Nite-Glow Run/Walk, KidZone, Battle of the Bands and fireworks are just part of the fun scheduled for East Central Community College’s first annual WarriorFest on Friday, April 8, on the ECCC campus in Decatur.

The event designed for all ages will be from 6 p.m. to Midnight on the north end of campus near the ECCC Pavilion and Lake area.

There will be activities throughout the evening, including a Hot Air Balloon Glow. A 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk will begin at dark with medals awarded to all participants and prizes to the top finishers in various divisions. There also will be a KidZone throughout the evening and fireworks after dark.

The highlight of WarriorFest will be the Battle of the Bands. There will be a $500 prize to the winning band. The featured band will be 5 Finger Discount out of New Orleans, La.

There also will be a Golf Ball Drop fundraiser with chances to win $1,000 and $500. Participants do not have to be present to win.

A Festival Food Court will be open starting at 11 a.m. offering chicken-on-a-stick, corn dogs, funnel cakes, sausage dogs, french fries, philly steak sandwiches, and other food items.

“With the postponement of the college’s Warrior Wonderland in December so that our football team, band, cheerleaders, and fans could participate in a bowl game in Texas, WarriorFest is another opportunity for East Central to host our local communities for an evening of fun, food, and fellowship on our campus,” said ECCC President Dr. Billy Stewart. “Our Alumni Association and many other members of our college family have put together an inaugural event that will provide family fun for all ages.”

Admission to WarriorFest is $10 per person; children three and under are admitted free. ECCC students, faculty and staff will be admitted free with valid school ID.

Admission includes all activities except the registration fee for the 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk, band entry fee into the Battle of the Bands, raffle tickets for the Golf Ball Drop, and Festival Food Court items. The registration fee for the 5K Nite-Glow Run is $25 per person or $15 for students and includes a free WarriorFest admission arm band. The fee to enter a band in the Battle of the Bands is $50. Raffle tickets for the Golf Ball Drop are $10 each. All proceeds benefit the ECCC Alumni Association.

The nationally ranked East Central Lady Diamond Warrior softball team will host rival East Mississippi Community College prior to WarriorFest on April 8. Those games are scheduled for 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. at the Softball Park on the ECCC campus. There is no admission for the softball games.

For a complete schedule of events or to pre-purchase admission arm bands to WarriorFest 2016, register for the 5-K Nite-Glow Run/Walk, register to participate in the Battle of the Bands, and purchase raffle tickets for the Golf Ball Drop, visit www.eccc.edu/warriorfest.

For additional information, contact David LeBlanc, director of alumni relations and the foundation at East Central Community College, at 601-635-6327 or dleblanc@eccc.edu.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




UWA ... American Idol’s Jessica Meuse to perform

University of West Alabama ... Student Union Bldg.
UWA brings American Idol’s Jessica Meuse for 2nd Saturday concert Meuse to perform Saturday at 8 p.m. at the SUB

LIVINGSTON, Ala.—The University of West Alabama continues the spring season of 2nd Saturday with singer-songwriter Jessica Meuse performing on campus March 12. The Saturday night performance is set for 8 p.m. on the top floor of the Student Union Building.

Meuse made her national debut in season 13 of the hit television show, American Idol. She finished the season in the top three and toured the U.S. and Canada with the top 10 finalists in a 40-date summer concert tour.

The pride of Slapout, Ala., Meuse calls her style a “blend of southern rock with alternative rock and roll,” and she’s also been described as “rock, infused with country and metal.”

In the time since the Idol tour, Meuse has recorded and performed across the country. Like so many new artists, she says she’s trying to do the impossible.

“The hardest part of this is definitely hustling to get the work,” Meuse said in an interview with UWA. “Sometimes, work is slow and life starts to get a little rough. A lot of people don’t look at being a musician as a ‘real job,’ jo it makes it a little tougher to be taken seriously.”

Being taken seriously is something that changed for her with the American Idol experience, though.

“It gave me a platform,” she said. The show put a spotlight on the music that Meuse had been making for several years prior, performing live shows, producing YouTube videos, and recording self-penned tracks. She had a significant social media following when she auditioned, dubbed the Meuse Mafia. But her fan base grew exponentially as she progressed through round after round of performances.

“Being on the show gave me a head-start in my career and forced people to take me more seriously with my music,” Meuse said. Friends, family, and anyone who had heard her name knew she liked to perform, but her run on American Idol confirmed her commitment for anyone who may have second-guessed her before. “I told them I wasn’t kidding!”

On Jan. 1 of this year, Meuse released her second independent single, “Rio Grande,” which is available, and has plans to release an EP soon.

Today, Meuse is keeping a close eye on artists like Chris Stapleton, with hopes that her name might soon be on the bill beside theirs.

She says she catches episodes of this final season of American Idol when she can.

“I know a couple of people who auditioned and made it through to Hollywood,” she said. “It’s exciting to watch when you have friends on there. It’s bittersweet to know this is the final season, but the show has had an amazing run and helped so many people get the opportunity to grow in their music, some who took it all the way.”

Meuse is one of a relatively small group of performers who’ve had the opportunity to perform on one of the nation’s biggest stages for young artists, and an even smaller group to make it through the rigorous weeks of judging, rehearsing, and popular vote that leads to the semi-finals of American Idol.

“I feel blessed,” she said with a smile.

Meuse’s 2nd Saturday performance at UWA is open to UWA students as well as the Livingston community. No admission is charged.

For more information on UWA’s 2nd Saturday series, contact Jason Gardner in the Student Activities office at 205-652-3624.

Betsy Compton / Director of Public Relations
The University of West Alabama
phone: 205-652-3892
address: UWA Station 6




Magnolia Middle School production - "No Child"

Meridian High School Auditorium
Magnolia Middle School Department of Visual and Performing Arts ... presents ... "No Child" - under the direction of Randy Ferino Wayne, Jr.
April 14th, 18th and 19th 7:00 pm each performance
Admission is $5 ... fundraising event for the school band program

(601) 484-4060


Tierra Robinson Joins East Central Community College’s Public Information Staff

East Central Community College
Tierra Robinson Joins East Central Community College’s Public Information Staff

Tierra Robinson has joined the Office of Public Information at East Central Community College in Decatur as sports information/communications specialist.

Robinson assumed the newly created position on Feb. 15.

As sports information/communications specialist, Robinson is responsible for overseeing all aspects of media, sports information, and promotion of the college’s 10 intercollegiate sports teams, as well as assisting the Office of Public Information in overall college media, promotion, external and internal communications and marketing initiatives.

A native of Eufaula, Ala., Robinson received her bachelor’s degree in Integrated Marketing Communications from the University of West Alabama in Livingston.

Prior to joining East Central, she was a reporter for Fox 30 News in Meridian. She also has interned with WTOK-TV in Meridian covering sports, including SEC Media Days, and has served as a videographer, editor, photographer and reporter for UWA’s Studio 96 Productions and as a filmer and assistant video coordinator for the UWA football team.

While a student at UWA, Robinson won several awards in the Southeast Journalism Conference competition and was named UWA’s 2015 Broadcast Journalist of the Year. She also was a UWA Ambassador and Miss University of West Alabama.

She is an active member of the Association of Women in Sports Media.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




Miss Maroon and White 2016 to be named during Thursday program March 10th

Mississippi State University ... historic Lee Hall’s Bettersworth Auditorium
Miss Maroon and White 2016 to be named during Thursday program

STARKVILLE, Miss.—Thirty-seven young women will compete for the title of Miss Maroon and White 2016 at Mississippi State University on Thursday [March 10].
The winner will be selected alongside four Maroon and White Beauties at a public program in historic Lee Hall’s Bettersworth Auditorium. The program will begin at 7 p.m., with doors opening at 6:30 p.m.
Tickets are $15 for general public and $10 for MSU students with an ID. Tickets are available now through the Center for Student Activities in the Colvard Student Union, Suite 314 or online at events.msstate.edu.
This year’s contestants include (by hometown):
AMORY—Junior Jilanna N. Simmons, a biological sciences major with a concentration in pre-dental and daughter of Will and Jennifer Lowrey; and sophomore Shelby G. Sweatt, a nutrition major and daughter of Dr. Lloyd and Rita Sweatt.
ATLANTA, Georgia—Junior Jacqueline M. Posley, a psychology major and daughter of Doris Smith.
BILOXI—Freshman Kara B. Krivanec, a biochemistry major and daughter of Joseph III and Christine Krivanec.
BOGUE CHITTO—Junior Caroleah E. Brister, a marketing major and daughter of Terry and Leah Brister.
BRANDON—Junior Hayley M. Henderson, an elementary education major and daughter of David and Angela Henderson.
BUFORD, Georgia—Sophomore Christana K. Landress, a broadcast meteorology major and daughter of Cecelia Landress.
CALEDONIA—Sophomore Clara B. Wallace, a biochemistry major with a pre-med concentration and daughter of Steve Wallace and the late Teena Wallace.
COLUMBUS—Sophomore Mallory M. Byrd, a communication major and daughter of Danny and Verlencer Byrd; and junior Maggie Gardner, a culinology major and daughter of Charlie and Michelle Gardner.
CULLMAN, Alabama—Junior Madison T. Eschan, a fashion design and merchandising major and daughter of Kimberly and Kenny Bartram and Jon Eschan.
FRANKLIN, Tennessee—Freshman Shelby Elizabeth Ferguson, a marketing major and daughter of Clint and Lynn Ferguson.
GRAYSON, Georgia—Sophomore Alexis K. Griggley, a communication/broadcasting major and daughter of Sam and Nikki Griggley.
GREENFIELD, Tennessee—Sophomore Abby L. Huffstetler, an elementary education major and daughter of Randy and Sherri Huffstetler.
GRENADA—Freshman Victoria Lea Crawford, a biochemistry major and daughter of Jerry and Brandy Harlos and Heath Crawford.
HATTIESBURG—Senior Rachel J. Henderson, a biological sciences major and daughter of Dr. Charles and Juliana Henderson.
HOUSTON—Junior Molly K. May, a communication/public relations major and daughter of Debra May and Glen Bingham.
JACKSON—Senior Allissia P. Hill, a biological sciences major and daughter of Jacquelyn Hill and Earnest Russell Jr.; and sophomore Shydia L. Johnson, a computer engineering major and daughter of Shantwana Johnson and Eugene Perkins Jr.
KATY, Texas—Junior Kaitlyn E. May, an educational psychology major and daughter of Craig and Betty May.
LAKE—Sophomore Abby G. Hollingsworth, a biological sciences major and daughter of Dr. Jimmy and Sharon Hollingsworth.
LEXINGTON, Indiana—Junior Ellen Ann Hawk a marketing major and daughter of Phillip and Mary Hawk.
LUCEDALE—Junior Taylor P. Bufkin, a communication/public relations and journalism major and daughter of Charles and Barbara Bufkin.
MEMPHIS, Tennessee—Junior Sarah A. Galbreath, an interior design major and daughter of Joe and Gay Galbreath.
MERIDIAN—Freshman Mayah J. Emerson, an educational psychology major and daughter of Albert Emerson and Katricia Emerson.
MONTICELLO—Senior Anna Kennedy Barker, an international business major and daughter of John and Tracy Catt and Stephen Barker.
MUMBAI, India—Freshman Aishwarya S. Dikshit, a biological sciences major with a pre-medicine concentration and daughter of Subodh and Manisha Dikshit.
NEW HEBRON—Junior Katie E. Bryan, a mechanical engineering major and daughter of Scott and Cindy Bryan.
NORTHPORT, Alabama—Freshman Kristen E. Ward, a political science major and daughter of Ricky and Beth Ward.
OLIVE BRANCH—Sophomore Juliette A. King, a human development and family studies/child life major and daughter of Tina and Gary King; and freshman Sydney E. Slocum, a liberal arts major and daughter of Les and Tina Slocum.
PONTOTOC—Freshman Amber Claire Huddleston, a biological sciences major with a concentration in pre-dentistry and daughter of Mac and Flavia Huddleston.
RIDGELAND—Freshman Mollie K. Keys, a biological sciences major and daughter of Jennifer and the late Richard Keys.
STARKVILLE—Sophomore Mamie Coleman Rybolt, an educational psychology major and daughter of Chess and Carrie Rybolt; and senior Chasity Renee Swoopes, a clinical exercise physiology major and daughter of Patrick and Cheryl Swoopes.
VICKSBURG—Freshman Tae’Lor D. Nelson, a criminology major and daughter of Denly and Tonya Nelson.
WINONA—Sophomore Ana Nicole Blakely, an art major with an emphasis on photography and the daughter of Kris and Tonya Blakely.
For more information about the event, email dedwards@saffairs.msstate.edu or call (662) 325-2930.
MSU is Mississippi’s leading university, available online at www.msstate.edu.




JCJC’s Theater department presents, “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

Jones County Junior College ... Bush Fine Arts Auditorium
JCJC’s Theater department presents, “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee”

ELLISVILLE – While it may have been a while since you've been in a Spelling Bee, Jones County Junior College’s Theater Department is inviting everyone to not only witness this funny musical Spelling Bee, but you could also be an actual participant. The musical theater production, “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” is being directed by Rob Mulholland, with musical producer and JCJC fine arts instructor, Jennifer Hart, and Nikki Johnson assisting with producing duties. The entertaining musical with four additional cast members chosen from the audience begins Friday and Saturday, March 18 & 19, at 7 p.m. in the JCJC M.P. Bush Fine Arts Auditorium. Sunday's matinee begins at 2:30 p.m. General admission is $10 with all high school and college students receiving free admission with a valid student ID. NOTE: The content of this musical is PG 13. Contact the JCJC Fine Arts Office for more information at 601-477-4094.

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be unlike any show JCJC has ever showcased. The cast consists of six mid-pubescents who vie for the spelling championship of a lifetime, with two sets of parents with unique family situations. The only adults are the two co-hosting the Spelling Bee and a comfort counselor to console and encourage the participants. In a twist to this eclectic musical comedy, Hart explained four, different audience members will be chosen to be part of the show each night making each night truly unique.

“The JCJC actors have to come up with witty lines in a matter of seconds, or improvise to make the audience members playing spelling bee participants’ reactions fit in the show. These unplanned moments are bound to provide some unexpected laughs and it will also challenge our students to be ready for a response,” said Hart.

Improvisation should not be a problem for Laurel native and theater veteran with 28 shows to her credit, Lydia Myers who portrays Rona Lisa Peretti, the former spelling bee champion who returns to host the Spelling Bee.

“This musical will keep the audience on their toes! A lot of the dialogue is improvisation… providing a fresh experience to every audience,” said Myers. “This is the most unusual show I’ve been a part of due to the improvisations and ad-libs that occur throughout the show. It definitely keeps me and my co-actor host on our toes to come up with quick-witted dialogue. Many times, we can’t stop laughing!”

Myers’ co-host is Steven Jones of Starkville who also has a lot of JCJC and community theater experience to his credit. He plays the Vice Principal, Douglas Panch who returns to the Spelling Bee after an “incident” five year years ago. The other adult characters in the play include two sets of parents and comfort counselor, Mitch Mahoney, played by JCJC sophomore and theater veteran, David Walker of Laurel. He plays an ex-convict ordered to do community service consoling kids and handing out juice-boxes to losing students.

As expected, some parents will be close by coaching their children, making for some comical moments, like Jordan Sanders of Ellisville’s character, Carl Grubenierre. Sanders’s theater friend, Gary Young plays Sanders “partner,” Dan Schwartz and together they are fathers to Logaine SchwartzandGrubenierre, played by Katie Hovan of Oak Grove.

“The biggest challenge playing my character is that he’s a gay man and I am not. It’s difficult to portray that on stage,” said Sanders who has performed in shows at South Jones High School and JCJC. “This show has taught me that getting out of your comfort zone is necessary, it always is in theater, but in my case I have to go above and beyond!”

Olive Ostrovsky, played by Haley Biglane of Ellisville is new to JCJC Theater but she has some experience in several theatrical roles in church productions. This shy speller muddles through despite having her mother, who is an ashram in India, played by Coco Caldwell of Laurel and her father who always works late and is played by Lamar Saddler of Quitman.

“This musical is hilarious and very unique. You feel like you are in an actual spelling bee. It’s very comedic and it also has its sweet and sad moments, like the song, ‘The I Love You Song’,” said Biglane.

Offering some comic relief, as well as life lessons is the character, William Barfee portrayed by Jonathan LaCourse of Long Beach. He said he relates to his character to a tee, which makes playing “Barfee” challenging at times.

“There are so many parallels between Barfee’s experiences and some events from my childhood. He’s the fat kid who was bullied to the point where he is always confrontational and lacks the ability to really trust anyone….I have never performed in a comedy before; only tragedies or playing a dark character. This was a whole new challenge for me, not being so serious!”

Other challengers in the Spelling Bee include Carter Poister of Laurel playing homeschooler, Leaf Coneybear, and Chip Cooley of Hopkinsville, Kentucky playing the Boy Scout and previous Spelling Bee champion, Chip Tolentino, and as Jesus for a cameo appearance. Neva Catlett of Lucedale will be portraying Marcy Park, the stereotypical, serious Catholic girl who speaks six languages and is an overachieving perfectionist. This is Catlett’s first production, partly because she’s majoring in Engineering; however she shared this observation about the play.

“It’s quirky, fun and just inappropriate enough to keep an adult audience interested. There’s a bit of the spellers’ characters in everyone I think. The real beauty of this musical is that it makes you realize that diversity in character is really an amazing thing.”

Cast of Characters in Alphabetical Order

Student’s Name Character Hometown
Lydia Myers Rona Lisa Peretti Laurel
Steve Jones Douglas Panch Starkville
David Walker Mitch Mahoney Laurel
Haley Biglane Olive Ostrovsky Ellisville
Jonathan LaCourse William Barfee Long Beach
Katie Hovan Logaine Schwartzandgrubeniere Hattiesburg/Oak Grove
Neva Catlett Marcy Park Lucedale
Carter Poister Leaf Coneybear Laurel
Chip Cooley Chip Tolentino Hopkinsville, KY
Jordan Sanders Carl Grubeniere Logaine’s Dad Ellisville
Gary Young Dan Schwartz Logaine’s Dad Ellisville
Chip Cooley Jesus Christ Hopkinsville, KY
Lamar Saddler Olive's Dad Quitman
Coco Caldwell Olive's Mom Laurel
Production Crew/Job
Rob Mulholland Director
Paige Perkins Choreographer
Jennifer Hart Producer (JCJC faculty)
Nikki Johnson Co-Producer (JCJC faculty)
Derrick Meador Accompanist
Tanner Crabtree Stage Manager Gautier
Hannah Hankins Costume Coordinator Laurel
Lucy Caroline Taylor Asst. Costume Coordinator Laurel
Daren Byrd Sound and Lighting
Sophia Daniel Spot Operator
Kiyah Hillman Spot Operator

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Carver Middle School Teacher Melanie Pittman Named National Association for Alternative Certification Teacher Intern of the Year

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Carver Middle School Teacher Melanie Pittman Named National Association for Alternative Certification Teacher Intern of the Year


March 3, 2016- Melanie Pittman, seventh grade math teacher at Carver Middle School, was named Teacher Intern of the Year by the National Association for Alternative Certification.
Each year, the National Association for Alternative Certification bestows this prestigious award on three new teachers from across the nation in recognition of demonstrating successful teaching and contributions to the field in their early years as educators.
In her second year at Carver Middle School, Pittman served as a Branch Manager for Regions Bank for 10 years prior to becoming a teacher. It was during her work at Regions that she felt called to teach.
“I volunteered in middle schools on the Coast to teach financial literacy through a program that Regions offered,” said Pittman. “When my family decided to move to Meridian, I knew that it was the perfect time for me to go back to school to get my teaching license.”
Alternative certification is an ideal way for individuals with established professional and/or life experience to segue into teaching. With deep content knowledge and expertise, candidates can teach in the classroom while simultaneously earning their teaching credential.
Highly selective, alternative certification programs provide rigorous training before the teacher steps into the classroom and continue to provide training and support throughout the program. This ensures every one of these highly-committed, highly-skilled teachers is exceptionally prepared. Alternative certification programs hold candidates to the same rigorous standards and levels of coursework that all teachers in the state are required to meet.
Pittman will graduate in May from Mississippi State University with a Master of Arts in Teaching.
“Mrs. Pittman is such a hard-working and positive teacher,” said Tommy Branch, Principal of Carver Middle School. “She is doing a great job teaching math, and we are so glad that she decided to become a teacher and join our team.”
Pittman will be formally recognized with Teacher Intern of the Year Award by the National Association for Alternative Certification during the annual conference to be held March 6-9, 2016 in New Orleans.
“Becoming a teacher and actually teaching has been one of the hardest things that I have ever done, but it has also been one of the most rewarding,” said Pittman. “Children need good teachers.”
About Meridian Public School District: The Meridian Public School District prepares all students in a parent and community partnership to be literate, self-directed learners with the confidence and character to compete in a complex and ever-changing world. MPSD serves six thousand students on 13 school campuses. For more information, please visit us on the web.


Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




EMCC TO LAUNCH EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING PROGRAM FOR SNAP RECIPIENTS

East Mississippi Community College
EMCC TO LAUNCH EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING PROGRAM FOR SNAP RECIPIENTS

MAYHEW -- East Mississippi Community College is implementing a program to provide employability skills to participants in SNAP, or the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. SNAP was formerly known as the Food Stamp Program.
Classes for the Employment & Training (E&T) program at EMCC’s Golden Triangle Campus begin April 4 and will last four weeks. Participants will not lose their SNAP benefits. At the end of the program, they will have the option of furthering their education or entering into paid internships.
“What we hope the program does is assist recipients in gaining skills and training needed to go to work,” E&T program Director Sha’Carla Petty said. “We are going to make sure they have the tools so when they leave here they can get a job and they can maintain that job.”
The program is similar to the college’s Counseling to Career, or C2C, program for students ages 17 to 24 who are taught skills to improve their employability.
Unlike C2C, the SNAP E&T program will be open to residents of all ages who are eligible to participate.
“I am looking forward to meeting the people who will participate in the program,” Petty said. “I believe we will have an older generation come in. I am going to love that because they are going to bring wisdom and add life experience to our class discussion.”
A new round of classes will be offered every four weeks to incoming students who qualify. Participants in the program must be referred by the Mississippi Department of Human Services.
“They can call me and I can direct them to the correct person at DHS,” Petty said.
Like the C2C program, students must complete a career readiness certification, or Work Keys, which focuses on three areas: applied mathematics, locating information and reading. The students will also be taught employee building skills in areas such as work ethics, communications, teamwork and organization. They will be taught how to write a resume and mock interviews will be set up so the students can hone their interview skills.
Finally, the students will be placed in a paid internship with a local company. Grant funds from the USDA will pay for 270 hours of work during the internship, with a minimum pay of $8 an hour, Petty said.
“We are hoping the internships will turn into permanent placement,” Petty said.
Some SNAP recipients will lose their benefits this year. At issue is a SNAP requirement once in place in most states that stipulates unemployed adults from the ages of 18 to 49 who have no disability and no dependents could only collect SNAP benefits for three months out of a three-year period.
Following the downturn in the economy in 2006, most states lifted the three-month limit. Mississippi followed suit.
“After careful consideration, our state leadership made the decision to not request a waiver and to implement a mandatory Employment & Training Program to assist those subject to the time-limit,” Mississippi Department of Human Services Public Information Officer Paul Nelson wrote in an email in response to a query.
“In Mississippi, the three-month limit went into effect January 1. For those receiving food assistance since that time, their three months ran out March 1.”
For more information about EMCC’s SNAP Employment & Training (E&T) program, call Petty at (662) 243-1930 or send her an email at swhite@eastms.edu.

Contacts:
Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490

Suzanne Monk, director of public information
Office: (662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879

Rocky Higginbotham, PI/marketing associate
Office: (662) 476-5013 Cell: (601) 604-2056



JCJC’s Pharmacy Technology program is accepting applications

Jones County Junior College
JCJC’s Pharmacy Technology program is accepting applications

ELLISVILLE-- Jones County Junior College’s Pharmacy Technology Program is now accepting applications for the fall 2016 semester, with May 1, 2016 as a priority deadline. Applications can be downloaded from the website at http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/pharmacy_howtoenroll.php or by calling the department at 601-477-4230.

The JCJC Pharmacy Technology curriculum is a two year program which combines classroom instruction, laboratory work, and clinical experience to prepare students for employment and advancement in the pharmacy field. Admission requirements for the program include a high school diploma or GED, a minimum score of 17 on the ACT, and a background check. The student will obtain an Associate of Applied Science degree after successfully completing the program and will be eligible to take the National Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam.

The Mississippi Board of Pharmacy has now required technicians who register with the board, to pass the technician certification exam within one year or before March 31st. The focus of the JCJC program is for students to earn an associate degree in Pharmacy Technology and to prepare for the National Pharmacy Technician Certification Exam. JCJC has maintained a successful passing rate for the exam.

The Pharmacy Technology program at Jones is designed to train a technician to work in each type of pharmacy setting and to proficiently perform each task. The US Department of Labor has forecasted pharmacy technician job growth of over 31% by 2018. Currently, there are an estimated 381,000 full and part-time pharmacy technicians in the United States.

Students will learn pharmacology, pharmaceutical compounding, dosage calculations, pharmacy management, pharmacy law, therapeutic classification of drugs, drug use and abuse, trade and generic nomenclature, medical transcription abbreviations, and health care devices utilization. Through classroom and laboratory instruction, students will learn methods of drug preparation, packaging and distribution, and the function and services provided by retail and hospital pharmacies. The technician will be prepared to transcribe physician orders, prepare, dispense, and deliver orders, prepare admixtures of intravenous solutions, maintain inventory control, replenish pharmaceutical supplies, maintain patient records, and communicate effectively with patients, other health care providers, and third party insurance agencies. Practical experience in community clinical and retail settings will enhance the learning experience.

Graduates of this program will have the skills necessary for employment as technicians under the direct supervision of a registered pharmacist. They will be qualified to assist and support pharmacists in providing health care and medications to patients in retail settings, hospitals, home health care, nursing homes clinics, nuclear medicine settings, and compounding pharmacies. Non-traditional employers will also include medical insurance companies, drug wholesale companies, medical computer software vendors, and drug manufactures.

For more information call 601-477-4021 or 601-477-4230, or email Tracey McCraw at: tracey.mccraw@jcjc.edu or stephanie.jones@jcjc.edu or visit the website at: http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/index.php. Program applications can be found at: http://www.jcjc.edu/programs/pharmacy/docs/application.pdf.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu





ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’ in Carthage

East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center ... in Carthage
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’ in Carthage
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “Starting a Business-First Steps” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 8, 2016, at the Carthage Career Advancement Center.
The seminar outlines the basic steps to start a business. Topics include regulations such as licenses and permits, legal forms of business ownership, basic marketing concepts to help analyze the revenue potential, lending terminology, outline for a business plan and other resources to assist in starting a business.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu.




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’

Louisville Career Advancement Center
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘Starting a Business-First Steps’
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “Starting a Business-First Steps” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, March 14, 2016, at the Louisville Career Advancement Center.
The seminar outlines the basic steps to start a business. Topics include regulations such as licenses and permits, legal forms of business ownership, basic marketing concepts to help analyze the revenue potential, lending terminology, outline for a business plan and other resources to assist in starting a business.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu.




ECCC’s LeBrun Selected Finalist for Online Learning Award

East Central Community College ... See Schedule
ECCC’s LeBrun Selected Finalist for Online Learning Award

Dr. Krista LeBrun, dean of eLearning Education at East Central Community College, was recently listed among 20 finalists for Pearson’s 2016 Online Learning Excellence Awards for outstanding leaders working in the online or blended learning environments.

The awards honor educators and administrators who have demonstrated measurable best practices and innovation in online education.
As part of her selection, LeBrun attended Pearson’s online learning conference, Cite 2016, in Amelia Island, Fla.




The Meridian Public School District will be hosting a couple of things this week ...

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The Meridian Public School District will be hosting a couple of things this week ...

Oakland Heights Elementary School
Wednesday, March 2 – 9:30 a.m.
Oakland Heights Library
Oakland Heights Elementary School has partnered with Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women who partnered with FirstBook.org to supply all Oakland Heights students in grades Pre-K through 3 with a book of their choice. Students will be able to choose a book to take home with them. As you know, this ties in perfectly to the literacy focus that the District has and helping prepare students for the Third Grade Gateway exam.

Crestwood Elementary School Read Across Meridian
Wednesday, March 2 – 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.
In honor of a focus on literacy and Dr. Seuess’ birthday, students from Crestwood Elementary School will be doing a “Read Across Meridian” day. Students will read at Poplar Springs Nursing Home, Brookdale, New Destiny Day Care, Meridian Head Start(s), and Golden Living. Students are taking reading to the community!

Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




EMCC STUDENTS TAKE BEST IN STATE IN DECA COMPETITION

Southhaven, MS ... See Schedule
EMCC STUDENTS TAKE BEST IN STATE IN DECA COMPETITION

SOUTHAVEN -- Six East Mississippi Community College students in the culinary and marketing programs took top honors in the state in the 2016 Collegiate DECA Mississippi competition in Southaven and will represent Mississippi in an international competition in Washington, D.C. in April.
Led by EMCC Culinary Arts Instructor Chef Shannon Lindell, three students in the Culinary Arts Technology Program competed against eight other college programs and took first place in the Restaurant and Food Management category. Those students are West Point resident Gene Colbert and Columbus residents Larry Joe Brownlee and Anthony Prowell.
Marketing student Ryan Dye of Columbus competed against four other colleges and took first place in the Professional Sales Presentation category.
Also, marketing students Alice Ward of Starkville and Jamie Beams of Columbus took first place in the category of Business to Business Marketing Case Study.
Dye was tasked with preparing a sales presentation and acted as a representative for Columbus-based Core Fitness Center.
“The judge said Ryan was the only contestant to actually close the sale in the competition,” said Dr. Joshua Carroll, EMCC instructor of Business and Marketing Management Technology, who serves as the DECA adviser.
Through no fault of their own, the three culinary students were almost disqualified from the competition when judges determined the internal temperature of the pork tenderloin they had cooked had only reached 115 degrees.
“They found out that the thermometer supplied at the competition was faulty and the reading was too cool by 35 degrees,” Lindell said. “When the judges cut the pork tenderloin open they found it was cooked perfectly.”
For the contest, two weeks ago the culinary students were sent a list of ingredients from which they were required to create a recipe. What they came up with was the pork tenderloin stuffed with cream cheese andouille served over wild rice, with a side dish of mixed vegetables topped with apple slaw.
The students had to not only cook and serve the dish but also gave a presentation to the judges.
“We went in with the attitude that if we did our best we would be happy,” Lindell said. “When they called out first place for our team I lost it. I was so excited for them.”
All six EMCC students will attend the Collegiate DECA International Career Development Conference in Washington D.C. April 16-19. They will compete against more than 1,000 other DECA Collegiate winners for international honors.
According to the organization’s website, DECA’s purpose is to prepare emerging leaders and entrepreneurs for careers in marketing, finance, hospitality and management in high schools and colleges around the globe.
DECA’s high school division includes 200,000 members in 3,500 schools. The collegiate division includes more than 15,000 members in 275 colleges and universities. The not-for-profit organization’s 215,000 members are located in all 50 states in the U.S. and the District of Columbia, Canada, China, Germany, Guam, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Spain.
Lindell expects the competition at the Washington event will be tough.
“We will be competing against some of the most well-known culinary schools in the field, including the College of Culinary Arts at Johnson and Wales University, the Culinary Institute of America, the New England Culinary Institute and the Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts.”
Two other EMCC marketing students, Tatum Barrier of Starkvile and Terencio Lawrence of West Point, competed in the Sports and Entertainment Marketing category in the 2016 Collegiate DECA competition in Southaven and took fourth place.

Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490

Suzanne Monk, director of public information Office
(662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879



ECCC Business, Education and Healthcare Expo Scheduled March 17

East Central Community College - Decatur campus ... Brackeen-Wood Physical Education Building.
ECCC Business, Education and Healthcare Expo Scheduled March 17

Career and educational opportunities will be available for East Central Community College students when the 14th annual Business, Education and Healthcare Expo is held Thursday, March 17, 2016, on the Decatur campus.

The public is also invited to attend the free event, which is scheduled from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the Brackeen-Wood Physical Education Building.

Wayne Eason, director of workforce education and expo committee chairman, said, “We are looking forward to another successful Expo. Many EC students began their careers because of this event each year, and we very much appreciate all the vendors not only for their participation but also for the services and opportunities provided to our students.”

Exhibitors from business, industry, education, finance, armed services and healthcare organizations are scheduled to attend.

For more information, contact Wayne Eason at ECCC, 601-635-2111 or call toll free, 1-877-462-3222, ext. 211. The e-mail address is weason@eccc.edu.




JCJC inducts 213 students into PTK international honor society

Jones County Junior College
JCJC inducts 213 students into PTK international honor society

ELLISVILLE – Two-hundred-and-thirteen Jones County Junior College students were recently inducted into the international honor society for two-year colleges, Phi Theta Kappa. These students are enrolled in 15 credit hours of classes and have maintained a 3.5 GPA, and will have to continue to meet academic standards to remain a member in good standing. Being a member of PTK also provides scholarship opportunities for senior college and opportunities for campus and community service, like this year’s voter registration and campus blood drives.

Before being inducted in the prestigious organization, keynote speaker and VP of Advancement and Executive Director of the JCJC Foundation Inc., Charlie Garretson encouraged students to be leaders in their communities. He shared everyone can be a leader in their community by actively supporting events and children’s activities; you don’t have to be an executive of a bank or the president of a company to be a leader. Garretson said, “stay-at-home-moms” are leaders too.


2016 PTK Inductees Name Hometown Major
Kelsey Elaine Addison Purvis Public Relations
Joshua Noel Allen Magee Finance
Jimmieya Bri'shay Anderson Hermanville Education
Laura Ann Armour Laurel Business
Jarred Clint Ashley Seminary Business
Kayte Anne Avera Laurel Dental Health
Zoe Nicole Baldwin Laurel Computer Software Engineering
Katlyn Marrie Wennette Barrett Lumberton Veterinary Medicine
Blake Dempsey Beach Soso Chemical Engineering
Ashtin Holly Beasley Buckatunna Education
Jared Evan Bennett Petal Electrical Engineering
Noah Lance Billingsley Hattiesburg Civil Engineering
Kayla Nichole Bishop Waynesboro Accounting
John David Blackwell Taylorsville Mechanical Engineering
Meagan Leanne Blackwell Hattiesburg Accounting
Tristan Eugene Blankinchip Lucedale Construction Trades
Stormy Boyanton Stringer Psychology
Cheyanne Marie Boyd Laurel Nursing
Brina Ashley Breaux Kiln Agriculture Science
James Nathaniel Breland Laurel Computer Sciences
Matthew Baron Breland Hattiesburg Agriculture Science
Carrie Nicole Broome Hattiesburg Medical Technology
Charles Edward Brown Laurel Liberal Arts
Bailey Elise Brown Laurel Pre-Law
Thomas Lee Bryant Moselle Marketing
Quentin Sace Buck Soso Computer Engineering
Erik Thomas Buckley Laurel Business
Natalie Nicole Buckley Ellisville Psychology
Keundreiah Burns Jackson Accounting
Jeremy Bryce Bynum Laurel Health Related Professions
Anna Nicole Caldwell aurel Theatre
Kamron Chance Carter Hattiesburg Mechanical Engineering
Courtney Simone Catchings Canton Psychology
Aaliyah Chatman Mendenhall Psychology
Kimberly Ellen Chisholm Baxterville Visual Arts
Sarah-Rebecca Karissa Citlahua Monticello Education
William Noah Clark Purvis Religion
Tyler Reed Cochran Waynesboro Business
Glen Cade Cockrell Magee Aerospace Engineering
Bridgett Nicole Cooley Ellisville Veterinary Medicine
Mary Cathryne Crutchfield Hattiesburg Liberal Arts
Elijah Grant Cummins Hattiesburg Business
Breanna Leigh Cunningham Enterprise Health Related Professions
Madison Rae Currie Brookhaven Marketing and Management
Christopher Todd Daugherty Pascagoula Civil Engineering
Chancee Lynn Davis Terry Communications
Kinley Elese Davis New Bern, NC Medical Technology
Samantha Lynn Dean Long Beach General Studies
Miles Dwayne Dennis Soso Theatre
La-Deja Monet Janae Easterling Mount Olive Liberal Arts
Fate Eiland Collins Agriculture Science
Miranda Kaye Espey Enterprise Communications
Joanna Leigh Espy Monticello Art
Courtnay Lorraine Evans Prentiss General Studies
Toshiaunna Evans Newton Nursing
Julie Elizabeth Fail Bay Springs Marketing
Jonathan Ryan Fennell Ellisville Liberal Arts
Andrew Fredrick Fiala Laurel Sports Management
Katie Renee Files Pearl Nursing
Austin Edward Flynt Ovett General Studies
Christen Nicole Ford Ellisville Nursing
Madison Renee Frazier Brandon Nursing
Emily Milagros Frometa Richton Nursing
Camille Brooke Fulmer Richton Political Science
YaRaeonna Gandy Shubuta Psychology
Jaylin Nicole Goodloe Canton Psychology
Abbey Faye Graham Laurel Pre-Medicine
Jason Thomas Gunnell Seminary General Studies
Alexis LeAnn Guthrie Hattiesburg Physical Therapy
Mary LeAnne Griffith Prentiss Nursing
Tyler Hancock Petal Business
Taylor Nashira Haralson Collins Civil Engineering
Cameron Charles Harvey Seminary Criminal Justice
Brittany Ellen Hedgpeth Collinsville General Studies
Rexal Bernard Heidelberg, Jr. Laurel Computer Sciences
Austin McKinley Herrington Ellisville General Studies
Stephanie Lynn Hill New Augusta General Studies
Kiyah LaNiece Hillman Madison Education
Seitoku Michael Hoffman Shubuta Liberal Arts
Natalie Lauren Hogue Saucier Nursing
Jacqueline Elizabeth Holifield Sandersville Medical Technology
Jordan Nichole Holifield Laurel Nursing
Alyssa Victoria Megan Hopkins Lucedale Biological Sciences
Kayla Rene Hopkins Ellisville General Studies
Melody Alexa Howard Long Beach Liberal Arts
Natalie Howard Waynesboro Sociology
Mason Alan Howell Laurel Business
Matthew Townsend Ishee Laurel Agriculture Science
Reese Timothy Ishee Laurel Agriculture Science
Scott Jarvis Hattiesburg Business
Jone't Dominique Johnson State Line Nursing
Chelsey Lyn Jones Hattiesburg Veterinary Medicine
Karly Lane Jones Ellisville Liberal Arts
Lindsey LeeAnn Jones Laurel Art
Shameria Juanece Jones Purvis Chemistry
William Aeron Jones Mendenhall Accounting
Carlie Elizabeth Kellems Ridgeland Liberal Arts
Tyler Anne Kelley Bay St. Louis Radiology
Joshua Stephen Kemp Hattiesburg Nursing
Karen Anne Kennedy Petal History
Rushton Lewis Kennedy Hattiesburg General Studies
Jacob Brody Keys Seminary Biological Sciences
Bryce Vaughn Kinzer Gautier Music
Arianna Faith Kitchens Collins Anthropology
Huston Alexander Kittrell Richton Biological Sciences
Morgan Alexandra Kowalski Bay St. Louis Communications and Political Science
Ethan Patrick Laird Ellisville Civil Engineering
Evelyn Kay Lawson Purvis Veterinary Medicine
Briana Joy Lewis Petal Psychology
Christina Laverne Lewis Mize General Studies
Morgan Olivia Lewis Ellisville Art
Catherine Elizabeth Locklear Pascagoula General Studies
Cade David Lott Hattiesburg Computer Sciences
William Robert Lowery Hattiesburg Journalism
Caitlin Brooke Malone Richton Education
Rachel Lynn Martin Hattiesburg Liberal Arts
Donaldo Martinez Laurel Pre-Medicine
Haden Alexis Mauldin Laurel Education
Christy Chardette McCaskill Petal Veterinary Medicine
Molly Elizabeth McCool Magee Pre-Occupational Therapy
Cori Lane McCrary McCarley Nursing
Ashley Nichole McDonald Louin General Studies
Monica Faith McDonald Raleigh Liberal Arts
Hannah Colleen McFarland Laurel Veterinary Medicine
Tristin Eugene McLain Buckatunna Psychology
Malcolm Conner McLendon Neely Liberal Arts
Jerrica Miller Lucedale Legal Services
LaDaria Moody Ellisville Nursing
Keshundra Moure Bay Springs Nursing
Marissa Fay Mulconrey Mize History
Marcie Lynn Napier Laurel General Studies
Shelby Lawson Nelson Moss Point English Education
Bailey Christian Nichols Heidelberg Nursing
George Nicholson "Gary, IN" Liberal Arts
Erin Delane Norris Taylorsville Marketing
Victoria O'Quin Meridian Education
Anna Claire Odom Bay Springs Accounting
Alejandra Oritz Hattiesburg Criminal Justice
Raven Owens Tylertown Nursing
Bethany Brianna Pace Mize Art
Alexandria Stori Parker Florence Pre-Law
Courtney Helen Parker Jatsuma, AL Liberal Arts
Kaylee Alyssa Parker Ellisville Nursing
Shreyaben Patel Hattiesburg Chemical Engineering
Jennifer Joan Payne Laurel General Studies
Christopher Pendleton Terry Electrical Engineering
Chase Tyler Pennington Jackson Liberal Arts
Kristina Nicole Pertuit Poplarville Business
April Vanessa Pierce Lucedale Biomedical and Chemical Engineering
Mollie Kathryn Pitts Petal Education
Carter Burke Poister Laurel Criminal Justice
Louis Powell Petal Education
McKensie Elise Pugh Shubuta Nursing
Peyton Fredrick Ramsey Laurel Accounting
Coleman Seth Reagan Tylertown Mechanical Engineering
Shelby Nicole Reed Moselle Education
Brianna Laine Risley Sumrall Pre-Medicine
Mallori Lynn Rodrigue Carriere Education
Lanie Marie Ronquille Richton English
Ashton Breann Rouse Mize Education
April Machae Rudolph Laurel Pharmacy
Sabrina Jean Sagers Biloxi Pharmacy
Malik Sampson Vossburg Liberal Arts
Kayla Dione Satcher Hattiesburg Education
Katie Liane Schroeder Vicksburg Nursing
Jared Michael Sewell Petal Pre-Medicine
Jenna Marie Sewell Petal Nursing
Savannah Sharkey Waynesboro Nursing
Tyler Chadwick Shivers Prentiss General Studies
Carly McKinnon Shoemake Ellisville Public Relations
Fallon Rebekah Sims Bay Springs Education
Jeri Renee Singley Waynesboro Medical Technology
Kassidy Mikayla Smith Shubuta Education
Joey Paskell Speir Mize Biological Sciences
Mercedes Starr Moselle Liberal Arts
Cody Randal Steele Purvis Accounting
Katelyn Angela Stone Hattiesburg Education
Joseph Michael Storment Leakesville Liberal Arts
Abigail Marie Sullivan Mendenhall Nursing
Alyssa Marie Sullivan Mount Vernon, AL Liberal Arts
Jade Sumrall Ellisville Marketing
Leia Claire Swilley Hattiesburg Biological Sciences
Kristen Elizabeth Templeton Richton Education
Zachary Tyler Tew Laurel Civil Engineering
Bethany McKayla Thornton Ellisville Pharmacy
John David Thornton Fruitdale, AL Nursing
Kassidy Mikal Tolbert Round Rock, TX Medical Technology
Madison Kate Torres Purvis Education
Zachary Alexander Torricelli Biloxi Biological Sciences
Savannah Marie Troyer Hattiesburg Veterinary Medicine
Bethany Lynn Vanderford Raleigh Biological Sciences
Kelsey Madison Venable Seminary Nursing
Lindsey Claire Walker Waynesboro Social Work
Brittany Walters Laurel Radiology
Kamrie Paige Walters Seminary Architecture
Seth Walters Taylorsville Agriculture Science
Tyler Mitchell Wells Raleigh Construction Trades
Brooke Erin West Ovett Accounting
Katie Amelia Westbrook State Line Education
Sarah Elizabeth Whiddon Sumrall Business
Bailey Diane White Bay Springs Nursing
Taylor Pyeatt White Laurel Education
David Anthony Williams Petal Information Technology
Ethan Alexander Williams Brandon Business
Ashley Williamson Mendenhall Nursing
Abigail Camille Wilson Columbus Biological Sciences
Karla Ann Wilson Collins Liberal Arts
Haylee Windham Stringer Education
Kaitlyn Jasmine Toni Windham Collins Agriculture Science
Benjamin Austin Winpigler Laurel Liberal Arts
Natalie Lauren Woo Hattiesburg Medical Technology
Reagan ReeAnn Yelverton Taylorsville Business
Bethany Hope Young Philadelphia Dental Health

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




ECCC to Hold Cheerleader Tryouts April 2

East Central Community College ... South Campus Gymnasium
ECCC to Hold Cheerleader Tryouts April 2
East Central Community College in Decatur will hold tryouts for the 2015-16 Cheerleading Squad at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, April 2, 2016 in the South Campus Gymnasium. There is a non-refundable $25 fee for all participants.
Pre-tryout clinics will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. March 29-31. During these sessions, participants will learn the cheer, fight song routine and stunts necessary for tryouts. Those wishing to tryout must attend at least one clinic.
Those selected for the squad receive full-tuition scholarships.
For more information, contact ECCC Cheer sponsor Pauline Karcher at paulinekarcher@eccc.edu or contact the Athletic Department at 601-635-6310.




JCJC HEADWAE recipients honored in Jackson

See Schedule
JCJC HEADWAE recipients honored in Jackson

ELLISVILLE – Two people from very different areas of campus were selected as Jones County Junior College’s, 2015-16 Higher Education Appreciation Day, Working for Academic Excellence representatives. Music instructor Meri Newell and secondary mathematics education major Faith Anderson represented the college at the annual event held in Jackson earlier this month.

Each of the state’s institutions of higher education chooses an instructor and a student every year for this prestigious award. Honorees are then recognized by both houses of the Mississippi Legislature and treated to a luncheon in their honor.

“I am shocked and honored to be named this year’s HEADWAE faculty recipient,” said Newell who resides in Petal. “There are so many incredible teachers and mentors on this campus that would have been deserving of this award. Teaching is still such a joy; no two days are ever alike, and I learn something new all the time.”

Anderson, a sophomore from Seminary, was also surprised when she learned of her selection.

“When I received the email saying that I had been selected, I was very excited and immediately told my friends and family,” Anderson said. “As the week progressed, and I was congratulated by my peers and teachers, I realized that it was truly a blessing to be selected for this honor.”

Newell joined the JCJC faculty in 1989 after teaching in high schools and middle schools in Alabama and North Carolina for more than nine years. She earned her bachelor’s of science degree in music education and her bachelor’s of arts degree in applied music with minors in English and history from Elon University in North Carolina. She later earned her master’s of music education degree at the University of Southern Mississippi and did post graduate work there, as well.

She is a member of numerous professional organizations including Music Teachers National Association, National Flute Association, Mississippi Junior-Community College Band Directors Association and Phi Delta Kappa Educational Honor Society.

At Jones, Newell has taught music appreciation, music for elementary teachers, flute, clarinet, saxophone and oboe lessons and also served as assistant band director for 18 years.

“I love watching instrumentalists gain skills and confidence in their abilities,” she said. “One of the most rewarding experiences in teaching music is seeing a student perform something successfully that they never believed they could achieve. The miracle happens every semester, and I never get tired of it. I also love watching music appreciation students discover that they actually like some of the music outside of their own comfort zone.”
Some of Newell’s fondest memories of working with the JCJC band program involve the Maroon Typhoon performances in the 1996 Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, Calif. and the 1997 Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York.

“All five miles of the Rose Parade have grandstands that are packed with people cheering you on, and you are looking at mountains in the distance as you are marching down Colorado Boulevard,” she recalled. “The Macy’s Parade was special because I went to the parade as a teenager from New Jersey and never dreamed that I would be a part of a band staff marching in the parade with a 252-member college band. I still get chills thinking about it.”

Anderson, the daughter of Tracy West of Rawls Springs and Joe Anderson of Brooklyn, is very active on the JCJC campus. She is a member of the Charles Pickering Honors Institute and Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society. Anderson represents the math department on the Student Government Association Senate. She tutors in the math lab and has volunteered with Treats in the Streets, Jones County Heart Walk, Loblolly Festival, ICE-Voter Registration and the JCJC Blood Drive.

Majoring in mathematics education is something Anderson has wanted to do for quite some time.

“I have always known that I wanted to teach because I love being around kids and helping my classmates with their schoolwork,” she explained. “When I realized I had a knack for math, I decided that I wanted to teach a higher level math in order to use my intelligence and love for math to change students’ perspectives about subjects such as algebra and calculus.”

As for the future, Anderson plans to earn her bachelor’s degree and “learn the ropes” of teaching by starting her career as a high school teacher in Mississippi.

“After I become more comfortable with what I learn in a high school, I plan to go back to school and obtain a master’s degree in order to work in a junior college,” she said. “Then, possibly continue on in order to obtain my Ph.D.”

Like all college students, Anderson has occasionally questioned whether or not she is in the right major. However, this experience has helped her feel confident in her choice.

“Being recommended by the math division chair for the HEADWAE honor, gave me the assurance I needed that I am on the right track,” she said.

HEADWAE recipients have been selected by their respective colleges and celebrated by the state legislature for 28 years.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Calvary Christian School will close at 12 Tuesday feb 23rd

Calvary Christian School
Calvary Christian School will close at 12 Tuesday ...
bad weather




ECCC Closing Early Today Due to Weather - Feb 23rd

East Central Community College
ECCC Closing Early Today Due to Weather

Due to the latest weather information available to East Central Community College, all classes and activities that begin at 1 p.m. or after on today, Tuesday, February 23, both on the Decatur campus and all off-site locations, will be cancelled. All college offices will close at 1:30 p.m.

We anticipate resuming normal operations on Wednesday, February 24.

We encourage all students and staff to exercise extreme caution while driving today and when making travel decisions. Please maintain an emphasis on personal safety at all times, and remain aware of the weather situation.

Due to the weather and the college closing, the Mabry Cafeteria will not open as scheduled tonight. ECCC residence hall students may pick up a sack meal for tonight at Mabry Cafeteria between 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. today. Lunch will be served as normal.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




ECCC’s annual Senior Days set for March 3-4

East Central Community College in Decatur
ECCC’s annual Senior Days set for March 3-4

East Central Community College in Decatur will host its annual “Senior Days” for area high school seniors on March 3 and 4.

Activities begin with registration in Huff Auditorium at 9 a.m. and end with an Information Showcase from 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. in the Bracken-Wood Physical Education Building. All campus clubs and organizations will have booths set up at the Information Showcase, and advisors from academic, career, technical and healthcare programs will be available.

In addition, students will be entertained by the Voce music ensemble, Collegians rock-n-roll band, Percussion Ensemble, Jazz Band and Wall O’ Sound, Centralettes dance line, and ECCC Cheerleaders.

There also will be a complimentary lunch at the Bailey Football Stadium.

“Attending a Senior Day is the perfect opportunity for future East Central Community College students to see the college firsthand,” said Dr. Randall Lee, vice president for student services. “We have invited all high school seniors in our district to attend and see all of the things East Central offers and receive information on why they should make ECCC their college choice.”

For more information, contact the Office of Student Services at 601-635-6205, or toll free 1-877-GO-2-ECCC. The e-mail address is go2ec@eccc.edu.

Bill Wagnon
Associate Vice President for Public Information
East Central Community College
P.O. Box 129
Decatur, MS 39327
Office: 601-635-6242
Fax: 601-635-4398
Cell: 205-540-0515




Jones County Junior College ... all locations "See Schedule" ... closing today at 1:00 pm because of inclimate weather

Jones County Junior College (all locations including Clarke County Center, Greene County Center, Jasper County Center, Wayne County Center and the Advanced Technology Center)
Jones County Junior College (all locations including Clarke County Center, Greene County Center, Jasper County Center, Wayne County Center and the Advanced Technology Center) will shut down regular operations at 1:00 p.m. today due to the severe weather threat.

All night classes and campus activities have been cancelled for Tuesday, February 23, 2016.

Dorm facilities will remain open.

Regular campus operations will resume Wednesday, February 24.
Finée R. Ruffin
Vice President

Marketing and Recruiting
Jones County Junior College
McClellan Hall - 228
900 South Court Street
Ellisville, MS 39437
Office: 601.477.4082│E-mail: finee.ruffin@jcjc.edu
www.jcjc.edu•www.jcjc.tv•www.jcjcathletics.com




East Jasper School District will be closing at 12:00 p.m., today ... due to inclement weather.

East Jasper School District
East Jasper School District will be closing at 12:00 p.m., today ...
due to inclement weather.




JCJC is offering non-credit courses in Ellisville

Jones County Junior College Advanced Technology Center in Ellisville
JCJC is offering non-credit courses in Ellisville

ELLISVILLE – Six non-credit computer classes will be offered at the Jones County Junior College Advanced Technology Center in Ellisville this spring. The Tuesday and Thursday night classes will be offered from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. The cost is $55 for the basic courses on Tuesday night and Thursday nights. QuickBooks 2015 will cost $200 and will meet beginning March 24 through May 26, for 3 CEU’s.

Microsoft Access 2013 Basic meets Tuesday nights beginning February 23 through March 29, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for 1.5 CEU’s.

Microsoft Excel 2013 Basic is offered on Thursday nights beginning February 25 through March 31, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for 1.5 CEU’s.

Microsoft Publisher 2013 Basic will be offered on Tuesday nights beginning April 5 through May 3, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for 1.5 CEU’s.

Microsoft PowerPoint 2013 will be on Tuesday nights beginning May 10 through June 7, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for 1.5 CEU’s.

Microsoft Excel 2013 Advanced will be offered on Thursday nights from April 7 through June 9, from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. for 3 CEU’s for $75.

All materials used in the class will be provided. To register one week before classes begin, call Shannon Wilks at 601-477-4114, or email, Shannon.wilks@jcjc.edu. CEU credits are available upon request for $10 at the end of the class.

To register at least one week prior to class, contact Shannon.wilks@jcjc.edu or call 601-477-4114. For the most current schedule, please visit the website: http://www.jcjc.edu/atc/eventscalendar_noncreditclasses.php or visit the Facebook page: www.facebook.com/jcjc.atc.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Abstract Artists enlighten JCJC art students

Jones County Junior College
Abstract Artists enlighten JCJC art students

ELLISVILLE – Abstract artists, Joe A. MacGown, his son, Joesph H. MacGown and Laurie Burton spent an afternoon broadening the abstract art horizons of Jones County Junior College art students. As featured artists for the month of February, the three Starkville residents shared their thought process and purpose behind their conceptual artwork.

“As a whole, Mississippi is not a haven for abstract art. It’s subjective. We’re weird but I also do nature scenes, admitted, Laurie Burton who also works as the costing manager at Garan Manufacturing, an international clothing manufacturer in Starkville. “Most people don’t get this stuff but I don’t let people who don’t get it, deter me. I like the challenge of putting it all together and the process of creating. It’s all experimental. Most of us are not artists to make money.”

Burton explained her sculptures usually tell stories or have a message, like the assemblage, “Girls are Complicated.”

“Using papier Mache, building materials and discarded items like rusty nails and tools, I create assemblage sculpture that mimics our inner strengths, frailties and idiosyncrasies. I am always looking for the unexpected when combining objects; combining similarities between human and mechanical shapes, functions and design,” said Burton.

Strolling through the JCJC Eula Bass Lewis Art Gallery through February, you’ll find abstract assemblage/sculptures and paintings. JCJC freshman art education major, Katelyn Stone, a South Jones High School graduate admitted the abstract form of art was hard for her to grasp.

“Everything is so unique and you don’t see it very often. Some is very detailed and I appreciate how Mr. MacGown goes with the flow as an artist. I’m a planner so it’s different for me.”

Joseph A. MacGown said he began studying art in Memphis and randomly found a job as an illustrator for an entomology researcher at MSU. As a scientific illustrator and research technician at Mississippi Entomological Museum, he has learned to draw very detailed objects, especially ants. He explained to JCJC students he likes to draw what he observes and make connections. For the most part though, he doesn’t plan or think about what he’s going to paint; he just creates.

“Everything I do I mess up or create by accident,” said the internationally known artist. “I look for patterns and experiment with different mediums and tools to paint. I’ve always liked to draw, especially fantastical surreal art,” said Joe A. MacGown.

With local, regional and international exhibits in Dallas to Portugal and Russia, MacGown shared he has several projects going on simultaneously. His painting, “Red Fish” took about an hour to paint and sells for $8,000, while his drawing, “Vent” took about 60 hours to create over months.

“I want people to appreciate my art. I love the process of creating, not as much as the end result or finished product,” said Joe A. MacGown.

The younger MacGown, Joseph H. MacGown’s version of art is obviously influenced by his father’s surreal and fantastical style. However the 19-year old likes to use more color in his artwork.

“I just started doing my own thing. I’m more about the moment of the expression. I like colors, and exploring with what I’m doing.”

Joseph H. MacGown has already done one installation, participated in at least 10 group exhibitions including an international exhibit, and recorded over 150 of his own musical compositions, in part because of the connections his father has developed over the years. During his visit at JCJC, the older MacGown challenged JCJC artists to collaborate with other artists and utilize the Internet to share artwork. MacGown explained meeting other artists from collaborations and online, has opened doors for his art to be seen worldwide.

Burton’s and the MacGown’s artwork will be on display through the end of the month at JCJC’s art gallery. For more information about the JCJC art show contact the gallery at 601-477-4148 or visit the gallery which is open Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m., and Friday from 8:00 a.m. until 2:30 p.m. The gallery is closed for lunch daily from 11:30 until noon.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




EMCC PILOT PROGRAM GARNERING NATIONAL ATTENTION

East Miss. Community College
EMCC PILOT PROGRAM GARNERING NATIONAL ATTENTION

MAYHEW – West Point resident Amanda Chandler, 46, often thought about earning a college degree but life seemed to get in the way.
“I had convinced myself I was too old to go back to school,” Chandler said.
Tired of not having the job she wanted, Chandler decided she would try. Last year, she enrolled in courses at East Mississippi Community College. Chandler was not confident she would succeed. Her foray into college was accompanied by fear she would become “overwhelmed by it all” and drop out.
That didn’t happen. In her second year, Chandler boasts a 4.0 GPA and is planning to attend either Mississippi State University or Mississippi University for Women once she graduates from EMCC.
Chandler credits the Empowering Mentors to Promote Women’s Retention (EMPOWR) program with helping her stay in school. In the program, nontraditional-aged female sophomore students serve as mentors to their freshmen counterparts.
Columbus resident Melissa Howell, 49, was tapped as Chandler’s mentor. Howell tried on several occasions to earn a college degree but suffered a series of tragedies that derailed her attempts, including the death of her husband while her two children were young and a protracted battle with cancer from which she emerged victorious.
In 2014, Howell enrolled at EMCC and is now close to graduating. Like Chandler, Howell had fears about returning to college.
“I felt like I was too old. I would not be able to do it. That the college age kids would not accept me, and that I may fail yet again,” she said.
Howell gave Chandler insight on how to juggle family, school and homework. Most of all, Chandler said, Howell lent moral support.
“It helped me a lot to know I could either message her on Facebook or pick up the phone and call her. It didn’t matter if it was 10 at night,” Chandler said. “We became fast friends.”

How it works

In its second year, EMPOWR is a pilot program that came about after the Women’s Foundation of Mississippi in 2013 commissioned researchers at Mississippi State University’s Social Science Research Center (SSRC) to investigate the needs of female community college students.
Researchers conducted focus groups at six of the 15 community college campuses in the state.
“Over and over, we heard from nontraditional women who said how hard it is for them to attend school while struggling with family and economic issues,” SSRC researcher and EMPOWR Project Director Anne Buffington said. “They felt like they didn’t have a voice.”
According a July 2015 report by the SSRC, 44 percent of women attending community college in Mississippi are employed, 31 percent have children and many face multiple demands and a sense of isolation.
Last school year, the Women’s Foundation of Mississippi, a Jackson-based nonprofit group dedicated to funding programs that improve the lives of women and girls statewide, awarded the SSRC a $50,000 grant to implement the EMPOWR program at EMCC’s Golden Triangle campus.
The goal of the program is to take steps to retain nontraditional women students 22 years of age and older who are at most risk of dropping out. Participants were identified by EMCC staff using data collected through the DropGuard Early Alert System that tracks absences and low test grades.
Ten students were recruited for the program in 2014 and paired with 10 sophomores who agreed to participate. EMCC Student Success Coordinator Laura Damm spearheads recruiting efforts for the program.
“The feedback from the participants has all been positive,” Damm said. “They love hearing others are in the same situation, that they are not alone in the issues that stress them out.”
This school year, the Women’s Foundation of Mississippi awarded a second grant of $40,000 for the program and the number of recruits was expanded.
“Of the thirteen mentees we had in the fall of 2015, six came in with GPAs from previous institutions,” Damm said. “All six improved their GPAs. Also, of those 13 mentees, three made the Dean’s List and three made the President’s List.”
Participants are required to meet with their mentors at least one hour per week. In addition, mentors and mentees attend monthly meetings at EMCC’s Mayhew campus that include guest speakers who address topics such as stress and time management, managing health and wellness, financial management and career counseling, Buffington said.
During the informal meetings at the Lions’ Brew on the Mayhew campus, attendees offer feedback and suggestions that are passed along to the college’s administration.
“They are really more like interactive sessions,” Buffington said. “They have turned out to be the real jewel of the program.”

Growing the program

The pilot program at EMCC is starting to get noticed outside of the state.
Buffington and fellow SSRC researcher Heather Hanna gave a presentation on the program last October at the New Perspectives in Mentoring Conference hosted by the University of New Mexico’s Mentoring Institute in Albuquerque. About 800 people from across the country attended the conference. The presentation was well received, Buffington said.
“In fact, we were approached by a professor at a San Francisco area community college who expressed interest in developing a similar program there,” Buffington said.
Both Buffington and Women’s Foundation of Mississippi Program Officer Latisha Latiker hope to see the program picked up by other community colleges in Mississippi.
“There is a need on all 15 colleges in the state,” Latiker said. “The problems at EMCC are not singular to them. If other states adopt our model that would be an added bonus.”
Buffington agreed.
“I would love to see if we could start one in Meridian,” Buffington said. “I just so believe in this program. I know it works. I would really like to see EMPOWR replicated at other community college campuses.”
Chandler is a fan. This year she is serving as a mentor.
“The EMPOWR program helped me realize I could do this and that there are people out there who care if nontraditional students make it,” Chandler said.
Howell agrees.
“I believe very strongly in the EMPOWR program,” Howell said. “If it can be installed in every community college, it will change lives.”

BY THE NUMBERS
According to a 2014 White House Council of Economic Advisers report, more women are likely to go to college and to graduate school than are men. Women are 48 percent more likely to have completed graduate school, according to the report. The National Center for Education Statistics projects the number of females who will enroll in degree-granting institutions this year and in 2023:
2016
Age Enrollment
18-21 4. 6 million
22-29 4.2 million
30 and older 3.4 million

2023
Age Enrollment
18-21 4.9 million
22-24 4.9 million
30 and older 4.2 million


Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490
Suzanne Monk, director of public information
Office: (662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879



Heavy Equipment Operator Training at JCJC

Jones County Junior College
Heavy Equipment Operator Training at JCJC
ELLISVILLE – The Jones County Junior College Workforce Development Team is offering training for jobs as an entry-level Heavy Equipment Operator. The class will meet at the JCJC Advanced Technology Center on Monday, and Tuesday, nights from 6 p.m. until 9 p.m. with hands-on training on Saturdays, at 6 a.m. until 3 p.m. The first class meeting will be held on Monday, April 4, 2016, at 6 p.m. at the ATC in Ellisville. Tuition is $714 for the Heavy Equipment Operator Training with possible tuition assistance available through your local WIN Job Center.

This course will include lecture, simulator training and hands-on training. Trainees will learn the basic operation of excavators and dozers from the ground up with a strong emphasis on safety. Upon successful completion of this course students will receive a certificate from Workforce Development and a National Center for Construction Education and Research transcript. Call JCJC for program information and to register by March 31, at: 601-477-4114 or 601-578-0293 or contact Webb Evans by email at: webb.evans@jcjc.edu.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




Forrest County Justice Court Judge, Gay Polk-Payton at Black History Celebration

Jones County Junior College
Forrest County Justice Court Judge, Gay Polk-Payton educates JCJC students on lessons about education and success

ELLISVILLE – “Education is more than classes,” declared Forrest County Justice Court Judge, Gay Polk-Payton to the students and guests at Jones County Junior College’s Black History Celebration. The featured speaker explained education is really a collection of life experiences as she issued a challenge to the audience in an effort to see change in themselves and the world.

“Understand that your education is not just what you’re getting here at Jones Junior College. It’s not just what you got in high school. It’s the totality of your circumstances; it’s everything. If your education is going to make a difference you have to take everything, your morals and your values…everything you’ve been gifted with, everything you’ve been cursed with. Take the totality of the circumstances and deal with what you got to deal with,” said the judge, attorney, singer, author, faculty member, radio host and motivational speaker.

The Hattiesburg native encouraged the audience to not just gain a “cluster of semester hours” but to get an education that makes a difference and to use all of it. She explained that parents have to begin instilling life lessons from the beginning, at birth and it’s up to the individual to then learn from what life deals them, good and bad. Using her 17 year-old son Kobe as an example, Polk-Payton explained babies learn how to manipulate to get what they want, like milk or mom.

“Kobe started crying…I checked his diaper because he had just eaten. When I picked him up out of the swing, he stopped crying. He attempted to manipulate me but I put him in the swing so he can be strong. …You can’t think they are too young to learn. You have to teach them,” she warned students.

She also used her personal situations as examples of turning adversity and personal traits that were considered problems into assets. A quick witted girl with a mouth, she said of herself, got her in trouble as a young girl but she turned that potential problem into a successful career.

“I was horrible! Back then it kept me in the principal’s office….This mouth could have ruined me but I learned how to harness it. My mother lovingly harnessed it…so I could learn how to do what I needed to do to be effective…. It could’ve destroyed me if I didn’t use it the right way,” said Judge Polk-Payton.

Another form of adversity is tragedy. The unexpected death of her father, three weeks before graduating from law school and the loss of her mother 17-months later, when she was two months pregnant could have overwhelmed the multi-talented judge. However, she said learning how to deal with all of her adversities helped her deal with the loss of her parents and her son’s medical issues, when he was diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma.

“Losing my parents was the most horrible tragic thing that happened to me. I realized in retrospect, I had other things that happened in my life. God was preparing me for that ultimate loss that I never could have handled in my life….He had grown me and stretched me and taught me how to handle adversity on different levels,” shared Polk-Payton.

Learning how to deal with adversity, she continued teaches us how to be better human beings. Dwelling on the loss of loved ones is not what they want, she explained.

“This is how I bless my mother’s memory; by being successful and by doing things she taught me how to do-being the person she raised me to be. I don’t bless her by hiding things away she taught me or that remind me of her. You have to harness (adversity). Everything you go through in life is a part of your education.”

As a judge, she sees the effects of not dealing with peer pressure. She reminds kids, “You have to take love with your discipline because the world is going to give you cold, hard consequences. Your teachers aren’t trying to take your joy or fun away. They’re trying to teach you how to harness your abilities so you’ll be productive for your future,”

Being responsible for your own actions she emphasized, is even more important as you grow up and are supervised less. If things don’t work out like you planned, there’s a reason she said confidently. The self-confessed “control-freak” said she realized during her son’s four surgeries, 31 radiation treatments and seven rounds of chemotherapy, nothing was in her realm of control.

“I don’t control anything. I can be humble, as a judge, as a singer, because I don’t have any power over anything. “

JCJC student, Tyesha Wolverton of Ellisville said she was inspired by the judge’s life lessons speech. With a career she hopes will take her “on the road” as a truck driver, she explained how Polk-Payton has inspired her to do more.

“Everybody goes through the same things. Quitting is not an option. She inspired me and changed me. I will not quit on my dreams and goals!” said the freshman.

Polk-Payton said her goal is to help others see the most valuable aspect of an education: An education can make a difference, only if all of your life experiences are included so there’s also understanding of how someone fits into the big picture.

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




JCJC Band Clinic sharpens skills

Jones County Junior College
JCJC Band Clinic sharpens skills
ELLISVILLE – About 380 high school and middle school band students are expected to participate in Jones County Junior College’s annual band camp this weekend. They will split up into four groups and spend a couple of days sharpening their skills and perform for the public. The JCJC band directors are pleased to present the hard work and talents of these students at the JCJC Clinic Concert on Saturday, February 20, at 1:30 p.m. in the Bush Fine Arts Auditorium. Students will work with guest clinicians, Anna Schwartz of Long Beach Middle School, Daniel Johnson of Clinton Public Schools, Shawn Sullivan of Starkville High School and Andrew Bonner of Warren Central High School. The public is invited to attend this event free of charge. For more information contact the JCJC Fine Arts Auditorium at 601-477-4094.


Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




EMCC’S ADDY, SESSER HONORED AT HEADWAE LUNCHEON

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EMCC’S ADDY, SESSER HONORED AT HEADWAE LUNCHEON

JACKSON – An East Mississippi Community College student and teacher were recognized among the best in higher education in the state at an awards luncheon at the Mississippi State Capitol.
Sophomore Matthew Addy of College Station, Texas, and Information Systems Technology instructor Andrew B. Sesser were named EMCC’s 2015-16 HEADWAE (Higher Education Appreciation Day, Working for Academic Excellence) Award recipients at a luncheon that took place Feb. 2. At the banquet, a student and teacher from each community college and university in Mississippi were recognized for their outstanding work.
“The represented EMCC quite well at the banquet,” EMCC President Dr. Thomas Huebner said.
The Appreciation Day is the Legislature's way of saying "thank you" to these students and faculty for their commitment to the future of Mississippi. Each year, honorees are invited to the state capitol where they are welcomed by the lieutenant governor and recognized in each chamber of the Legislature. A luncheon follows during which each student and faculty honoree is recognized in front of their guests, institution leaders, corporate sponsors, and legislators.
Addy, the son of Noel and Shelley Addy, is the student chapter president of the Association of Information Technology Professionals at EMCC. He is majoring in Computer Networking Technology.
“I chose this path because it is ever-growing,” Addy said. “The job possibilities are all the way across the board: from PC repair, to network security, to systems administration, or a combination of all of them. The career field has enough options to explore, and become proficient at, that learning is always a must.”
“Matthew is a hard worker and he always is willing to help others to brush up on their skills,” Sesser said of Addy, who is one of Sesser’s students.
Sesser earned an Associates in Applied Science degree from EMCC in 2005. He was awarded professional certifications in A+, Network+ and Security+.
Sesser, who has worked for EMCC for nine years, lives in Starkville with his wife, Amy. They have a son, Rain, and daughter, Maisy.
Sesser, the co-sponsor for EMCC’s Association of Information Technology Professionals, credits his mother, who was a teacher, for influencing his career path.
“I wanted to make a difference in education by being someone who is passionate and fun to learn with, and from,” Sesser said. “If money was my only goal in life, I would have chosen a different profession.”
Sesser said helping students grasp new concepts is one of the things he most likes about teaching.
“I also love the fact that in my field staying current is a must, so I am always learning new things about equipment, students and myself,” Sesser said. “I love what I do so much it is not a job. It is a time for me to work with more technology.”

Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490

Suzanne Monk, director of public information Office
(662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879



GOVERNOR, LT. GOVERNOR, EMCC PRESIDENT TOUT QUALITY OF STATE’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES

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GOVERNOR, LT. GOVERNOR, EMCC PRESIDENT TOUT
QUALITY OF STATE’S COMMUNITY COLLEGES

JACKSON – Gov. Phil Bryant and Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves lent their voices in support of Mississippi’s 15 community colleges and their role in providing workforce training throughout the state.
Both Bryant and Reeves spoke Feb. 3 at the annual Capitol Day event hosted by the Mississippi Faculty Association for Community and Junior Colleges (MFACJC) and attended by a number of community college students, faculty and presidents.
Bryant repeated his desire to use $50 million in funds from the Mississippi Department of Employment Security to help fund workforce training. Bryant noted that the state has “great opportunities … to train the workforce of the future in the community colleges across this great state. I’ve asked the Legislature to help us,” he said. “Those funds can go to the community colleges directly to help train the workforce of the future. We understand there is no better place to invest that $50 million than the community college workforce program.”
Bryant is a graduate of Hinds Community College who was working changing tires when he got a postcard inviting him to come to Hinds.
“I got in my 1955 Chevy and drove to Raymond. The next day I was a college student,” he said. “Hinds Community College and colleges all over the state in the 1970s and today open the door for higher education to a blue-collar generation that that would have never been able to achieve success without a community or junior college. And it goes on today.”
Like Bryant, Reeves touted the quality of the state’s colleges.
“The fact is our tremendous community college system in Mississippi puts us at a competitive advantage compared to many other states when trying to recruit business and industry to our state,” he said. “This system also puts us at a competitive advantage because of all the work they do on workforce development to provide the skills necessary not for the jobs of 50 years ago but for the jobs of the next 50 years.”

National attention

While the focus of Capitol Day was on workforce development, Mississippi’s community colleges have garnered national attention for providing quality instruction across all fields of study. In August, WalletHub, a financial analyst company for small business and consumers, gave Mississippi’s community colleges the top national ranking for cost, classroom experience and education/career outcomes.
WalletHub’s analysis is underscored by the recent announcement that eight community colleges in the state are eligible to compete for the prestigious 2017 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence.
East Mississippi Community College is among the contenders for the $1 million Aspen Prize, which represents the nation’s signature recognition of high achievement and performance among America’s community colleges.
"The choice to attend EMCC is a choice to engage in an important, relevant and life-changing education,” EMCC President Dr. Thomas Huebner said. “From programs that prepare students to transfer to four-year institutions to those designed to equip graduates for careers in business and industry, every dollar invested in us by the residents of Mississippi is a dollar well-spent. EMCC does an exceptional job of helping our students make a difference in their families and in their communities. We appreciate the confidence shown to us by Governor Bryant and Lt. Governor Reeves and we take that responsibility very seriously."
Last month, a report released by the Community College Research Center at Teachers College, Columbia University, as well as the Aspen Institute College Excellence Program and the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, ranked Mississippi sixth in the nation for the number of community college students who transfer to a university and fourth in the nation for the percentage of low-income community college students who transfer and earn a bachelor’s degree.
“With continued support from our Legislature, Mississippi’s community and junior colleges will continue to provide a great return on investment for our students, citizens and state,” said Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College instructor Brian Carriere, president of the 1,000-plus member MFACJC.

Doing a lot with a little

While community colleges have had much success in Mississippi, they’ve had to do it with lean funding. The community colleges are asking for “fair and equitable funding” in comparison to their K-12 and university counterparts.
The colleges are focusing their efforts on demonstrating their value and return on investment.
Community College leaders are asking for about $83 million to keep tuition costs down, produce more graduates and skilled workers, attract and retain qualified faculty, expand allied health programs and update technology. General operating funds and faculty salaries are top priorities.
The second priority for the colleges is $20 million for Workforce and Economic Development. Half of this money would go toward the MI-BEST Career Pathways program. MI-BEST is a team teaching model in which GED preparation and job skills training are done concurrently. Only 57 percent of Mississippi’s prime working age adults are employed, and many of those who are not have no education or training to fall back on. The rest of the money would go to updating Career-Technical Education equipment and facilities and to update or start new programs.
The colleges’ third priority is $75 million for capital improvements, including $37,500 in bonds for FY 2017 and 2018 each. This approach gives community colleges the same opportunities universities already have for a multi-year bond bill.
About 22 students and 10 faculty and staff from EMCC traveled to Jackson to take part in Capitol Day. Community colleges from across the state sent representatives to the event to meet with legislators to lobby for mid-level funding – per student funding halfway between K-12 education and the regional public universities.

Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490
Suzanne Monk, director of public information
Office: (662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879



ECCC Announces Fall Semester Honor Roll

East Central Community College
ECCC Announces Fall Semester Honor Roll

Students named to the 2015 fall semester honor roll, which includes those selected to the President’s List, Dean’s List and Honorable Mention List, have been announced at East Central Community College in Decatur.
PRESIDENT’S LIST
(Alphabetically by hometown)
Those named to the President’s List, full-time students with a 4.0 grade point average, include the following:
BRANDON: Jacob Huff

CARTHAGE: James Cain, Haley Ezelle, Andy Pilgrim, Brandy Quick, Laura Shelton and Danny Smith;

CHUNKY: Joseph Clark and JoHannah Smith;

COLLINSVILLE: Jamie Cantey;

CONEHATTA: Makenzie Byrd, Amber Chaney, Austin Jordan and Nina LaBue;

DECATUR: Codi Ballard, Erick Bishop, BriiAnna Bout, Sharon Bout, Kaley Bufkin, AnnaLea Clarke, Kaitlyn Holmes, Richard Horton, Sydney Kennedy, Lalah McMullan, Samuel Mitchell, Austin Spears, Samuel Tero, John Thames, Samuel Thompson, Caleb Vaughn and Kaylee Yates;

DIAMONDHEAD: Pashien Kelley-Johnson;

FLORENCE: Durham Norman;

FOREST: Zachary Boswell, Josh Crutcher, Christopher Fortenberry, Alex Grace, Kelli Lewis, Kaitlin Smith,Tyler Sullivan and Trace Wade;

GULFPORT: Christian Bellew and Carrissa Stevenson;

HICKORY: Tabitha Walker;

LAKE: Alexandria Crout, Anthony Emmons, Mary Harris, Matthew Mitchell, Tabatha Richardson and Kaitlyn Ware;

LAWRENCE: Hannah Mitchell;

LENA: Blake Barnes and Shelly Dowell;

LOUIN: Jacob McNeil;

LOUISVILLE: David Boydstun, Faith Brown, Tiara Coleman, Carly Dickerson, Benjamin Duty, Joelie Hill, Barbara Hudson, Kegan Humphries, Katie McCool, Samantha McCrimon, Morgan Orr, Courtney Prisock, Rebecca Rodman, Charles Smith, Chelsea Smith and Lainey Smith;

MACON: Reagan Fleming;

MADISON: Blake Morton;

MERIDIAN: Kaitlyn Knuth, Sarah Laird and Gage Leifried;

MORTON: Hope Craft, Paxton Holmes, Morgan Jones, Tyler Runnels, Memry Thompson and David Westberry;

NEWTON: Lindsey Ayllon, Amanda Creekmore, Anthony Grimes, Kendra Miller, Caleb Terry and Sarah Whittle;

NOXAPATER: Mychelle Hudson, Christina McKinnion, Kayla Thompson and Anna Webb;

PASCAGOULA: Richard Jacobson, Katherine Moran and Brittany Rasco;

PASS CHRISTIAN: Tyler Ladner;

PEARL: Lauryn Tucker;

PHILADELPHIA: Sydney Battle, Fallon Beckham, Cheyenne Bradley, Caleb Brown, Christy Bryan, Ayla Burton, Katlyn Duke, Shana Ely, Brelan Gardner, Lora Goodin, Brianna Griffin, Kathryn Hillman, Benjamin McDaniel, Anthony Miller, Katie Mills, Taylor Phillips, Cody Stevens, Marissa Thomas, Khalil Triplett, Taylor Ward, Dianna Wesley and Michael Whitlock;

PRESTON: Madison Johnson, Chancellor Taylor and Alan White;

PURVIS: William Roseberry;

RALEIGH: Michael Boggan;

UNION: Agatha Berryhill, Brittany Bryan, Brentley Comans, Emily Crenshaw, Kolt Hagan, Jacob Hamm, Shelby Harrison, Jon Henry, Samuel Kelly, Keri Mayfield, Breona Moore, Karleigh Moss, Alejandra Salgado, Ashley Tillman and Karey Williams;

WALNUT GROVE: Lauren Copeland and Hannah Pope;

WEST: Benjamin Nail

DEAN’S LIST
(Alphabetically by hometown)
The Dean’s List includes the following full-time students who achieved a 3.5 to 3.99 grade point average.
BRANDON: Jala Hobson and Presley McLemore;

CARROLLTON: Patrick Morrison;

CARTHAGE: Joseph Atkison, Steven Barnett, Bethany Bradley, Autumn Cheek, Demetrius Clark, Chelsea Cleveland, Berenice Felix, Jaycie Malone, Meagan Perry, Kaitlin Pittman, Emily Quin, Lillian Shuler, Chloe Thaggard, Jessie Verry, Charlie Wilcher, Kaitlin Withers and Justin Wooten;

CHUNKY: Monica Culpepper, David Goetz, Braydon Lewis, David Martin, Morgan Smith and Christy Stewart;

COLLINSVILLE: Kyle Hoskins, Lauren Cantey and Benjamin Pace;

COLUMBUS: LaTerrica Jefferson;

CONEHATTA: Cassidi Bout, Mollie Cordeiro, Tanner Davis, Michael Eichelberger and Baylee Green;

DECATUR: Rebekah Buckley, Jessica Forrest, Maria Hawks, Courtney Kelly, Hamzeh Khader, Alana Knowles, Mary Levin, Anna Norman, Stephen Stewart, William Stewart, Rebecca Tero and Nathaniel Thorne;

ETHEL: Mikella Vance;

FLORENCE: Kenzie Jenkins;

FLOWOOD: Zachary Claycomb;

FOREST: Caleb Bates, Christopher Brown, Candice Crimm, Emily Dykeman, Kara Falcon, Katherine Fortenberry, Michiel Gaddis, Eric Gunn, Lindsay Hedge, Holly Hendershot, Natalia Londono, Taylor Lott, Amy McDaniel, TaNissa McNair, Tomaz McNair, Laron Moore, Andrea Neal, Bryce Power, Brittney Rawson, Mary Schwab and Johna Wedgeworth;

FULTON: Aniyah Marshall;

GAUTIER: Hagan Brown;

HAMPTON COVE: Cole Prestegard;

HATTIESBURG: Mahalia Gibson, Johnta Hughes and Patrick Walker;

HICKORY: Mary Brand, Peyton Cain, Kelly Chapman, Chaney Mills, Madison Parks, Alexa Roberts and Courtney Williams;

HORN LAKE: Allie Turner and Dalton Wilson;

KILBOURNE, LA: Lacey Hill;

LAKE: Tyler Bennett, Rachel Clay, Anastasia Crout, Tallie Johnston, Shelby McGrew and Shelby Wilkerson;

LAWRENCE: Shawna Bush and Daneisha Fulton;

LENA: Celeste McDonald, Lorrie Moore and Hayley Slay;

LITTLE ROCK: Quenten Brown, Matthew Cress, Jody Kennedy, Hannah May and Cody Warren;

LOUIN: Kent Shelwood;

LOUISVILLE: Taylor Alexander, Madelyn Ball, Abegail DePriest, Hallie Doster, Tracy Grabher, Morgan Hillhouse, Dylan Jones, Jamey Kinard, Andi McCrimon, Cassidy Pearson, Brandon Rogers, Brantlie Sheets, Amaziah Sierra, Stephanie Smith, Chandlor Swearingen, Madelon Taylor, Branden Vick, Jerome Warren, Logan Webb and Kristen Yarbrough;

MADISON: Kenneth Bonds;

MENDENHALL: Cayla Myers;

MERIDIAN: Brandy Little, Randa Mathis and Samuel Robinson;

MORTON: Jasmine Brown, Crystal Davila, Evan Derrick, Kaitlyn Evans, Patrick Harrell, Anna Housley, Carla Land, Carrie Thompson, Tina Vaughn, Neely Watford and Saylee Yount;

NESBIT: Gabriel Gross;

NEWTON: Michael Buntyn, Jalen Cox, Deborah Luke, Lamont May and Zachary Munn;

NOXAPATER: Candace Barrett, Jamie Carter, Hanna Hamilton, Brooke Smith and Weiying Wang;

OCEAN SPRINGS: Corey Hilliard;

OLIVE BRANCH: Lacey Field and Kayla Young;

PASCAGOULA: Megan Parrish;

PELAHATCHIE: Marley Maddox;

PETAL: Caitlyn Aldous;

PHILADELPHIA: Kayla Alexander, Breann Boatner, Natalie Bounds, Cayley Branning, Shannon Brazzle, Cheryl Brown, Patrick Burrage, Kiara Cruz, Kiara Cunningham, John Eakes, Michael Ellingburg, Destiny Files, Grant Gordon, Jarard Greer, Shelby Hemphill, Madison Marshall, Hosea McBeath, Johnathon Moore, Tatiana Moore, Kimberly Poole, Chandler Posey, Briana Roberts, Alisha Savell, Emma Savell, Michael Skinner, Clarissa Smith, Warlchez Spencer, Kimberly Watkins, Aspen White, Tristan Willis, Abby Winstead and Felicia Wright;

PRESTON: Dustin Burton and Karla Higginbotham;

PURVIS: Elizabeth Frey;
QUITMAN: James Parker and Jelisa Pearson;

RED LODGE: Kaitlin Wolff;

RIDGELAND: Summer Lavender and Blake Paben;

SALLIS: Caitlyn Burnley;

SAUCIER: Gabrielle Stapp;

SEBASTOPOL: William Wragg;

SENATOBIA: Andrea Hannaford;

SHAW: Deshawn Davis

SOUTHAVEN: Nicholas Thomas;

STONEWALL: Randy Creighton;

STURGIS: Bay White;

UNION: Landon Bounds, Lee Bowen, Brandon Clark, Emily Hunter, William Kennedy, Brandi Kilpatrick, Brady McElhenney, Wamon Monk, Haley Moorehead, Shauna Mowdy, Brooke Payne, Hannah Payne, Maggie Peebles, Tyler Sistrunk, Cassie Smith, Leslie Smith and Colby Todd;

VANCLEAVE: Lucas Orchard;

WALNUT GROVE: Sarah Barfield, Caitlan Dearman, Tatyana Johnson, Jonathan McDill, Dalen Parker, Dekendrick Rushing and Elizabeth Tatum; and

WEST POINT: Maegen Ellis

HONORABLE MENTION
(Alphabetically by hometown)
The following full-time students were named to the Honorable Mention List and earned a 3.0 to 3.49 grade point average:
BAILEY: Danny Howell;
BRANDON: Alec Gibbs, Micah Parten, Zachary Vickers, Brett Warren and Caleb Welch;

CARTHAGE: Landon Alexander, Austin Anderton, Mariah Boyd, Joseph Burgess, Bobby Burns, Hailey Clark, Triston Coats, Mia Coleman, Cassandra Flores, Stephanie Griffin, Monica Hamilton, Madison Hannis, Ravion Henry, Payton Hinkle, Keanu Hoye, Wesley Jelen, Tristan Johnston, Patricia Jones, Shannon Keene, Alana King, Jaylon Leflore, Amanda Mosley, Enoc Reynoso, Letecia Rome, Joshua Sanders, Johnny Stephens, Calvin Tate, Kristen Upchurch, Katilyn Walker, Olivia Walters and Corey Wilder;

CHOCTAW: Cynthia Cooley, Elias Jimmie and Malcolm York;

CHUNKY: Destinee Buckley, Everett Fisher and Colby Skelton;

CLINTON: Michael Davis;

COLLINS: Austin Balthazor and Peyton Lott;

COLLINSVILLE: Steven Bufkin, Leslie Kinney and Mason Wooldridge;

COLUMBUS: Rahsaan Lang;

CONEHATTA: Whitney Billings, Christon Flores, Taylor Fulkerson, Courtney Johnson, Morgan Leach, Garrett McDill, Cody Shaw and Reagan Warren;

DAPHNE: Andrew Joiner;

DECATUR: Niva Alexander, Colby Amis, Andrew Barnett, Melanie Brashier, George Brown, Malcolm Chambers, Leah Chandler, Alyssa Chesney, Luke Clark, Karen Cleveland, Antonio Curry, Savannah Gates, Meagan Higginbotham, Abigail Hollifield, Jantzen Jones, Mary Jones, Madalynn Myers, James Nance, Jordan Phillips, Chelsea Pilgrim, Lindsey Savell, Kayla Taylor and Hailey Williams;

DIAMONDHEAD: Chase Freeman;

ENTERPRISE: Patrick Pittman;

FLORENCE: Christopher Yarbrough;

FLOWOOD: Madison Greer;

FOREST: Britney Allen, Sabrina Buckner, Myeshia Dukes, Brianna Easterling, Trenton Evers, Alan Graham, Evany Gray, Jodashia Greenhouse, Christian Guy, Levi Harmon, Zachary Harmon, Louis Hernandez, Christain Mazique, Rachel Miles, Alexus Mobbs, Elliott Parish, Brittany Parrott, Ariel Patrick, Chandler Powell, Aline Ramirez-Lopez, Jay Riser, Yuritza Rosas, Joseph Sanders and Tyler Self;

FRENCH CAMP: Jesse Hosket;

GAUTIER: Toni Lowe;

GEISMAR: Bria White;

GOODMAN: Jamal Keith;

HARPERVILLE: Louis Tolbert;

HATTIESBURG: Bradston Burnside, Samantha Duncan, Janiya Evans and Allen Fails;

HICKORY: Jacob Cooley, Harleigh Embrey, Robert Johnson, and Stefan McClellan;

HORN LAKE: Jakob Williams;

JACKSON: Eric McPherson and Isiah Thomas;

LAKE: Justice Battle, Jawuan Bell, Angela Boyd, Shadejha Brown, Heather Buckley, Adrianna Crout, Emily Emmons, Mara Jones, Kardarius McClendon, Joshua Parkman and Colby Yarbrough;

LAUDERDALE: Arkeem Johnson;

LAUREL: Heath Morris and Timothy Murphy;

LAWRENCE: Zachary Richardson, Micah Tillman and Anthony Valentine;

LENA: Elizabeth Harris, Randell Morgan, Mya Smith and Dearron Stewart;

LITTLE ROCK: Shea Alexander, Duster Allgood, Stephanie Gilbert, Elizabeth Hennington, Elisha McDaniel and Billy Murphree;

LOUIN: Kayla Dawkins and Kendrick Holder;

LOUISVILLE: Tamara Boydstun, Austin Chambliss, Sara Fuller, Kira Hardin, Jeremy Harrington, Kiaa Haynes, Quanaeqa Hunt, Cody Johnson, Gina Johnson, Lane Johnson, Peyton Jones, Alexandria Lee, Jonathan McAdory, William Miller, Margaret Morris, Jordan Prisock, Abigail Ray, Cody Reed, Gabriel Roark, Jennifer Smith, Channing Wall and Maya Wilmer;

MADISON: Kaitlin Thrash;

MAGEE: Ariana White;

MCCOOL: Brittany Black and George Freeman;

MEMPHIS, TENN.: Derrick Dandridge and Keion Peoples;

MENDENHALL: Billy Cameron;

MERIDIAN: Sharon Blanks, Samantha Boykin, Maliyah Brown, Chantel Henderson, Keith Hudson, Christopher Ivy, Shelby McKelvaine, Terrell Palmer, Sharee Parrish, Miracle Rushing and DeMichael Williams;

MORTON: Hunter Aycock, Leonel Costilla, Skylar Davidson, Jayson Dempsey, Shamyia Hughes, Aerian Keeton, Lucas Morgan, Maci Phillips, Kelsey Porter, Christina Shoemaker and Grayson Smith;

MUNFORD: Shaliyah Wiggins;

NEWTON: Samantha Adams, Ethan Dunavant, Alexandria Evans, Kyra Evans, George Garner, Zachary Hammons, Malinda Harris, John Hedrick, Eddie Houston, Meshach Martin, Austin Mize, MontAja Norman, Miriam Rivers, DaQuaun Robinson, Charles Roebuck and Anthony Wansley;

NOXAPATER: TreKena Carter, Steven Curtis, Sarah Johnson, Chase Jordan, Mitzi Kirk, Sara Thorne, Anna Wells and Steven Womble;

OLIVE BRANCH: Megan Yarbrough;

PAULDING: Devon Jones;

PEARL: Connor Brennan and Shaeffer Pennington;

PELAHATCHIE: Kayley Pennington;

PETAL: Erin Golden;

PHILADELPHIA: Butch Adcock, Brittany Anderson, Christina Bates, Madison Baysinger, Emily Beckham, Jerron Bennett, Christopher Boatner, Abby Bowman, Breanna Charley, Mary Collins, Daniel Driskell, Luke Eldridge, Kaelin Gentry, Kinsey Gentry, Juanesha Griffin, Angela Harrison, Amber Hill, Karye Ingram, Sherry Keith, Ashton Killen, Chaiydreanna LeFlore, Brandon McCarty, John Meazell, Karliscia Moore, Tyasia Nicholson, Diamond Parks, Kendrell Peden, Casaja Phillips, Saul Rosales, Skyla Sims, Wesley Smith, David Stell, Lacy Stone, JaQuanna Stribling, Kristi Taylor, Michael Thomas, Truvette Thompson, Peyton Williamson, Andrew Winstead and Marcus Woodward;

PINE BLUFF, ARK.: Kabion Ento and Henri Murphy;

PRESTON: Ragan Case;

PULASKI: Bethany Barnes, Carlie Batte and John Hill;

RICHTON: Kalen Meggs;

ROSE HILL: Jennifer Watkins;

SEBASTOPOL: Billy Marshall and Holly Summers;

STARKVILLE: Ciara Harris, Michael Miller and Thomas Pugh;

SUMRALL: Brittney McCray;

UNION: William Alford, Jennifer Anderson, James Arthur, Henry Benson, Brandon Davis, Ryan Eakes, Valarie Ferguson, Michael Harrison, Rebecca Harrison, Meredith Keady, Tommie Killen, Matthew Mason, Breanna McBeath, Mason McDill, Tatum McMullan, Jason Morgan and Haley Taylor;

WALNUT GROVE: Demond Clark, Bryant Flake, Jasmine Jones, Jasmine Payton and Trace Thrash;

WINONA: Joshua Carpenter




EMCC: BEAUTY & BEAU PAGEANT, THREE STAND-ALONES

East Mississippi Community College
EMCC: BEAUTY & BEAU PAGEANT, THREE STAND-ALONES

EMCC, Beauty & Beau Top 5 Beauties:

The top five contestants in East Mississippi Community College’s 2016 Beauty & Beau Pageant are ...
Hannah Daugherty of Leroy, Ala., Addison Lowery of Columbus, “Most Beautiful” winner Abby Watson of DeKalb, Carlie Teffeteller of West Point and Sara White of Calhoun City. Abby Watson is the daughter of Robert and Joy Watson. She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honorary for two-year colleges. Watson enjoys reading, spending time with family and friends, going to the river and beach and attending sporting events. After graduating from EMCC, she plans to attend a four-year college or university and pursue a degree in elementary education. The Beauty & Beau Pageant was held Feb. 4 at Stennis Auditorium on EMCC’s Scooba campus.


EMCC, Beauty & Beau Top 10 Beauties:

The top 10 contestants in East Mississippi Community College’s 2016 Beauty & Beau Pageant are ...
Caroline Walker of Columbus, Addison Lowery of Columbus, Lauren Ware of Mayhew, Pooja Shaunak of Starkville and Hannah Daugherty of Leroy, Ala.
“Most Beautiful” winner Abby Watson of DeKalb, Carlie Teffeteller of West Point, Anna-Douglas Brown of Columbus, Carlee Doty of Brookhaven and Sara White of Calhoun City. “Most Beautiful” winner Abby Watson is the daughter of Robert and Joy Watson. She is a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honorary for two-year colleges. Watson enjoys reading, spending time with family and friends, going to the river and beach and attending sporting events. After graduating from EMCC, she plans to attend a four-year college or university and pursue a degree in elementary education. The Beauty & Beau Pageant was held Feb. 4 at Stennis Auditorium on EMCC’s Scooba campus.


EMCC, Beauty & Beau, Most Beautiful-Most Handsome:

Abby Watson of DeKalb was crowned “Most Beautiful” and Zachery Kauffman of Macon “Most Handsome” at East Mississippi Community College’s 2016 Beauty & Beau Pageant. Abby Watson is a member of Phi Theta Kappa, the national honorary for two-year colleges. After graduating from EMCC, Watson plans to attend a four-year college or university and pursue a degree in elementary education. Zachery Kauffman is an EMCC Student Ambassador and a resident assistant for a Scooba dormitory. He plans to pursue a career as a welding and fabrication technician.




JCJC enrollment continues to grow despite trends

Jones County Junior College
JCJC enrollment continues to grow despite trends
ELLISVILLE – Nationwide and statewide, the enrollment figures at community colleges are on the decline except for a few, like Jones County Junior College. Both fall and spring enrollment numbers show increases of students attending classes. The Jones 2016 spring enrollment figures show a four-percent increase over spring 2015. VP of Marketing and Recruiting, Finee’ Ruffin has a few ideas why Jones has been the exception to the rule, but she is not willing to reveal all of her strategies.
“We are going against the grain. We are not doing ‘business as usual.’ In order to get different results, you have to do things differently and we are really focusing on our students and giving them every opportunity to succeed,” said Ruffin.
It will be hard to keep up with the “Joneses” if President, Dr. Jesse Smith has his way. He’s proud of every success the college is able to earn because it also means students are succeeding.
Offering multiple-entry points throughout the semester, with short term and fast track class options are some methods Jones students have to allow them more opportunities to be successful and to make college more accessible whenever they are ready.
“Despite the declining enrollment predictions in national statistics, we are beating those expectations, and I am very pleased.” said Dr. Smith. “It means we’re doing something right.”
Not only is the focus on recruiting, both administrators explained the focus is also on retaining students. Retention is one of the contributing factors for the upward trend in enrollment.
“We’re doing a better job of getting our ‘story’ out to the communities we serve in our eight-county district and we’re improving accessibility to higher education through our four, County Centers in Bay Springs, Leakesville, Quitman and Waynesboro,” said Ruffin. “I think in a competitive job market, more people are realizing they need more training and a college degree to improve their economic future.”
A unique partnership with county supervisors has allowed students in Greene and Jasper County’s to take classes at JCJC at little or no cost. The Tuition Assistance Guarantee Program enables its residents taking college courses at their local Center facilitated by JCJC or at the Ellisville campus. This is another pathway for the residents of those counties to attend JCJC while county funds are available. Eligibility requirements for prospective students vary by county.
“Even with county assistance or scholarships, Jones still offers a quality education at an affordable price. Last year we offered summer courses at a reduced tuition cost because we know money is another big factor in making a college education accessible. However, even without a discounted tuition, I believe more people are realizing the value of a higher education and they are investing in themselves, their county and their state with a college degree, and improved skills,” said Dr. Smith. “I hope more people will focus on their future and realize the importance of a college degree from Jones.”

Teresa McCreery
Jones County Junior College
Director of Media & Public Relations
Office: 601-477-4032
www.jcjc.edu




ECCC Plans Black History Month Program Feb. 17th

East Central Community College Vickers Fine Arts Center auditorium
ECCC Plans Black History Month Program Feb. 17th.
East Central Community College will hold its annual Black History Month program Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2016, on the Decatur campus.
Activities begin at 7 p.m. in the Vickers Fine Arts Center auditorium.
There is no charge for admission.
James Miller, ECCC dean of students, will serve as guest speaker.
Special music will be provided by The Gospel Song Birds of Meridian.
The ECCC Gospel Choir sponsors the Black History Program and will also perform.
Mrs. Brenda Johnson serves as gospel choir sponsor.
For more information, contact Johnson at 601-635-2111.




LEIA HILL NAMED ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT AT EMCC ... MEGAN REYNOLDS SELECTED AS NEW RECRUITER

East Mississippi Community College
LEIA HILL NAMED ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT AT EMCC
MEGAN REYNOLDS SELECTED AS NEW RECRUITER

SCOOBA – Leia Hill has been named assistant vice president for Institutional Advancement at East Mississippi Community College.
In addition to directing college-wide recruiting efforts, Hill will be responsible for overseeing the college’s media, public information and marketing teams.
“Leia has many exciting ideas about how we can collectively utilize our media, marketing and recruiting resources to improve opportunities for those we serve,” EMCC President Dr. Thomas Huebner said.
Hill has worked at EMCC since February of 2015, when she was hired as the recruiter for the Scooba campus. She served as the staff sponsor for Student Ambassadors and the Student Government Association and helped with orientation programs like JourneyEAST.
Before joining EMCC, Hill worked for eight years in the community college system where she was responsible for community outreach. Prior to that, she worked in advertising and community relations. In 2014, she started a consulting firm focused on social media and online presence management, where she worked with a number of successful clients in Meridian and surrounding areas.
Hill, who resides in Lauderdale with her husband and two sons, recently completed a graduate certificate focused on social media from the University of Florida. She will begin her master’s in Higher Education Leadership later this year.
“This position is unique because I will be involved in several different areas through our foundation: community relations, alumni affairs and recruiting. East Mississippi Community College has a strong presence in the region and I am excited to be a part of our future growth.”
EMCC employee Megan Reynolds has been selected to fill Hill’s former position as recruiter. Reynolds has been employed with the college since 2014, and most recently served as the administrative assistant to the vice president of the Scooba campus.
Reynolds is a lifelong resident of Scooba. Her mother works in the IT department at EMCC’s Scooba campus. Reynolds has attended events at the college for as long as she can remember.
“I am excited about the opportunity to promote the school I have been involved in all my life,” Reynolds said. “A lot of people come to EMCC’s campus in Scooba and learn to love it. I already love it. It is my home.”
Reynolds earned a degree at EMCC’s Scooba campus in Health-care Data Technology and a certificate in Business and Office Technology. While enrolled at EMCC, Reynolds served as a Student Ambassador and a residential assistant. She was also a member of the Student Government Association and was a Compass leader with JourneyEAST, an interactive orientation program for incoming students.
“When considering who would fill the recruiting position, Megan was the immediate choice,” Hill said. “Her work ethic has been evident in all that she has accomplished at EMCC, and I am excited to see her succeed in this position as well.”

Michael Stewart, public information associate
Office: (662) 476-8417 Cell: (601) 701-1490

Suzanne Monk, director of public information
Office: (662) 476-5014 Cell: (601) 480-2879



ECCC Announces Annual HEADWAE Honorees

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ECCC Announces Annual HEADWAE Honorees
Sophomore Ben Pace of Philadelphia and mathematics instructor Jenna Wright of Madden represented East Central Community College in Decatur at the 2015-16 Higher Education Appreciation Day: Working for Academic Excellence (HEADWAE) program held Tuesday, Feb. 2, in Jackson.
The annual HEADWAE observance was established by the Mississippi Legislature to honor academically talented students and faculty members from each of the 36 public and private member institutions of the Mississippi Association of Colleges.
Pace is a pre-dental major and a graduate of Neshoba Central High School. A Dean’s List scholar, he was selected for Who’s Who Among Students in American Colleges and Universities and was named to the Phi Theta Kappa All-Mississippi Academic Team.
He serves as president of the Presidents Council, co-president of Warrior Corps and Phi Theta Kapa, and is a member of the Concert Choir, Phi Beta Lambda, Sigma Sigma Mu Tau and Students Against Destructive Decisions. He is a former member of the Wall O’ Sound Band and Ac’cents Show Choir.
He is the son of Derek and Patty Pace of Philadelphia.
Wright has been employed at the college since 2012.
She earned the bachelor’s degree in math education at Troy University and completed a master’s in statistics at Mississippi State University.

She is a former graduate teaching assistant at Mississippi State.

She and her husband, Eric, reside in Madden.

Honorees were invited to the State Capitol where they were welcomed by Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves and recognized in each legislative chamber.
A luncheon was also held at the Jackson Marriott Hotel in downtown Jackson, during which each student and faculty honoree was recognized in front of their guests, institution leaders, corporate sponsors and legislators.
In addition to the public recognition, a booklet was published featuring photos and biographical sketches of each honoree.




ECCC Instructors Ryals, Evans Nominated for MSVCC Awards

East Central Community College
ECCC Instructors Ryals, Evans Nominated for MSVCC Awards

East Central Community College instructors Chris Ryals and Chas Evans were recently nominated for the Mississippi Virtual Community College (MSVCC) instructor of the year award.

Ryals teaches drafting and design technology and has been employed at the college since 2011.

Evans teaches guitar and music classes and also serves as director of the Collegians rock and roll band. He joined the ECCC staff in 2014.

The two finalists will travel to the Creating Futures Through Technology conference in Biloxi March 2-4, 2016. All finalists from the 15 community colleges in Mississippi will be recognized at the MSVCC luncheon on March 2, where the recipient of the award will be announced.

The winner will receive a plaque and a $1,000 stipend courtesy of MSVCC.

For more information contact Dr. Krista LeBrun, dean of eLearning Education at ECCC, at klebrun@eccc.edu.




EMCC RALLIES AFTER TORNADO AT SCOOBA CAMPUS

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EMCC RALLIES AFTER TORNADO AT SCOOBA CAMPUS


SCOOBA – It was a bad day. A tornado touched down at East Mississippi Community College, doing serious damage to student housing and athletic facilities. But it was a good day, too. Campus officials in Scooba put an emergency plan into action with speed and efficiency. All students were in their safe places when the metal-twisting, tree-snapping winds arrived.
“We were in our cottage, watching TV, when we got a message from coach telling us to go right now to the Hawkins Building. We stayed in interior rooms with no windows until they told us we could leave,” said baseball player Drew Golden.
“On the way back, we saw the damage to the field and fences first, then we saw the cottages. It’s not a great situation, for sure, but we’ll get through it. We have God on our side.”
Most of the damage at EMCC from Tuesday afternoon’s tornado was confined to the athletic village where Golden and his teammates live. Small cottages line the village’s short cul-de-sac. Members of the basketball and rodeo teams live there, too.
One cottage was turned over. Several had shifted on their blocks. Porches and steps were skewed. A metal storage building by the adjacent batting cages was a heap of bent metal. Outfield fences were blown down at the baseball field. Trees were toppled or broken in half.

Quick action in Scooba

As the storm approached Tuesday afternoon, EMCC President Dr. Thomas Huebner was driving back from Jackson. With the possibility of tornadoes in the forecast, all EMCC locations had closed at 2 p.m.
For most of the trip, the skies had been clear, even sunny. But then they darkened to the north. Huebner stayed in contact by phone as the weather got worse, the tornado warnings came, and his team in Scooba started moving students to safety.
Freshmen Aysia Marchbanks, Sierra Roberts and Quaisha Betts were in Gilbert Anderson Hall, a women’s dormitory. EMCC staff barricaded doors and windows and ushered the students downstairs, where some took refuge in the lobby and others huddled in an interior bathroom.
“We weren’t taking it too seriously,” Marchbanks said. “But then we heard a loud noise and the lights went out. We took it seriously then. I was scared.”
In the nearby women’s Honors Dorm, Maegan Stewart was in a downstairs bathroom with other students: “I was worried and called my mom. She was trying not to be freaked out because she knew I would have been freaked out too.”
Dr. Huebner arrived on campus about two minutes before the tornado.
“I joined my family in the administration building. I couldn’t see anything. I could only wait,” Huebner said. “After the storm passed, I got a call from our assistant police chief. He said, everybody’s fine, but you need to come out to the cottages.”
About 80 students had nowhere to sleep. School officials made arrangements for half to spend the night in a nearby motel. EMCC students made room for the other half, doubling up in dorms all over campus.
Huebner praised EMCC employees for their quick, sure action.
“Our team did an outstanding job. They moved our students to safety long before the storm hit, and our students had a great attitude, too. I appreciate all the hard work done in advance on EMCC’s emergency plan. It made the difference.”

In the morning

On Wednesday morning, clean-up and repairs began. EMCC student athletes joined employees, picking up debris and hauling cottage skirting out of the tree line.
An EMEPA crew removed broken lamp posts and installed new ones. Ben Dudley, director of the Kemper County Emergency Management Agency, visited campus as he inspected sites that had sustained damage. Kemper County supervisors and other local officials toured the area in pick-up trucks.
Kyle Jordan, senior field representative for U.S. Rep. Gregg Harper, arrived mid-morning: “We wanted to check on the students and talk to Dr. Huebner about what services EMCC might need from us.”
There were a lot of people pulling together.
“If you don’t think Mississippi has a sense of community, live through a disaster. By the time I had a chance to check my phone last night, I had more than 200 messages from faculty, staff, neighbors and friends. I heard from virtually every community college president in the state,” Huebner said.
“The messages were all the same and all from the heart. Prayers, encouragement, offers of help and support. It was overwhelming.”
Recovery will take time. Students can’t move back into the cottages until they’ve been inspected and repaired. EMCC needs to consult insurance adjusters and help local officials as they look into whether federal disaster assistance is an option.
“But all of that is about things, not people. You can replace things,” Huebner said.
“Our students are safe and our hearts are grateful. We hoped we would never need an emergency plan but, as bad situations go, this is as good as it gets.”




ECCC - Canceled classes

East Central Community College
Due to the latest weather information available to East Central Community College, all classes and campus activities that begin at 1 p.m. or after on today, Tuesday, February 2, both on the Decatur campus and all off-site locations, will be cancelled. All college offices will close at 2 p.m.

We anticipate resuming normal operations on Wednesday, February 3.

We encourage all students and staff to exercise extreme caution while driving today and when making travel decisions. Please maintain an emphasis on personal safety at all times, and remain aware of the weather situation.




The Meridian Public School District will be dismissing school early

Meridian Public School District
The Meridian Public School District will be dismissing school early today due to the possibility of severe weather.
Elementary Schools will dismiss at 12:40 p.m.
Middle and High Schools will dismiss at 1:10 p.m.

Elizabeth McDonald
Public Relations Director
Meridian Public School District
601.482.0423
emcdonald@mpsdk12.net




Neshoba County School District will be dismissing at 1:15pm ...

Neshoba County School District
Neshoba County School District will be dismissing at 1:15pm ...
Today, Feb. 2nd, 2016




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business-First Steps’

Workforce Development Center in Decatur.
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business-First Steps’
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “How to Develop a Business-First Steps” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, at the Workforce Development Center in Decatur.
This seminar outlines the basic steps to start a business. Topics include regulations such as license and permits, legal forms of business ownership, basic marketing concepts to help analyze the revenue potential, lending terminology, outline for a business plan and other resources to assist in starting a business.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu




ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business-First Steps’ Seminar in Philadelphia

Neshoba Business Enterprise Center in Philadelphia
ECCC SBDC to Offer ‘How to Develop a Business-First Steps’ Seminar in Philadelphia
East Central Community College’s Small Business Development Center will offer a free seminar on “How to Develop a Business-First Steps” from 5:30 to 7 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 23, 2016, at the Neshoba Business Enterprise Center in Philadelphia.
This seminar outlines the basic steps to start a business. Topics include regulations such as license and permits, legal forms of business ownership, basic marketing concepts to help analyze the revenue potential, lending terminology, outline for a business plan and other resources to assist in starting a business.
Ronald Westbrook, director of ECCC’s Small Business Development Center, will serve as facilitator for the class.
For more information or to register, contact the Small Business Development Center at 601-635-6297. The e-mail address is rwestbrook@eccc.edu or vthames@eccc.edu.




ECCC ... Hurtt, Ferguson Receive MBEA Awards

East Central Community College
Hurtt, Ferguson Receive MBEA Awards

East Central Community College instructors Judy Hurtt
and Christy Ferguson were honored at the Mississippi Business Education Association’s (MBEA) annual conference. Hurtt received the MBEA Outstanding Community College Business Educator award and Ferguson received the Outstanding Career and Technical Business Educator award. Hurtt also serves as community college representative to MBEA and Ferguson is president-elect.