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Miss. House, Senate approve suspending rules; Would allow vote to change state flag if passed

Mississippi state flag flying in front of capitol building in Jackson (Shutterstock)
Mississippi state flag flying in front of capitol building in Jackson (Shutterstock)(WHSV)
Published: Jun. 27, 2020 at 12:29 PM CDT
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The Mississippi House voted on Saturday to suspend rules, allowing for a vote to take place to change the current state flag.

The vote on House Concurrent 79 was approved by a vote of 85-34. The suspension of the rules is the first step to changing the state flag. According to yallpolitics.com, east Mississippi representatives Scott Bounds, Billy Adam Calvert, Steve Horne and Troy Smith voted against suspending the rules, while Charles Young, Jr., voted in favor.

The Senate later passed the House measure on a 35 to 14 vote. According to yallpolitics.com, east Mississippi senators Jennifer Branning and Tyler McCaughn voted against suspending the rules. Sen. Jeff Tate voted in favor.

Y’all Politics reports the bill to be introduced deletes code section 3-3-16 which is the current design of the state flag and creates a commission to design a new flag to be voted on by the public in November. There won’t be a choice between the current flag and another design, as in a 2001 referendum.

Governor Tate Reeves already said if the resolution on a new flag reaches his desk, he will sign it.

HC 79 also includes the creation of a flag committee. The HCR says the new flag cannot contain the Confederate battle emblem and says the flag must include “In God We Trust.”

The goal is to get the new flag design on ballots in November. If the commission’s design doesn’t get majority approval in November, HCR 79 says the commission would design another new flag.

The “In God We Trust” would likely come as part of the official state seal, which was introduced by former governor Phil Bryant. Bryant has tweeted in support of one design that includes the seal prominently:

After the vote, the House adjourned until 2 p.m. Sunday.

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